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Chassis as radiator

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
I'm looking to buy a 2u chassis, a low power CPU, Motherboard, infiniband adapter, and GPU (Waiting for the 1020-1040 range to be available) and create an entirely fanless liquid cooled system in the low profile 2u. This should, finished product, be stacked in my AV rack below my television with the stereo receiver and other AV equipment.
The system will be fairly low load, primarily just playing back 4K x265 videos from kodi, some light gaming (Emulators mostly. higan, mame, maybe some playstation), and if it doesn't destroy the thermals, I'll get Steam running on it either for native games, or as a streaming target.

My tentative plan is thus: I want to purchase an aluminum chassis 2u case, with removable top, and I plan to mount high efficiency water blocks to every available internal surface, fairly evenly spaced, including using quick disconnects to have them on the removable chassis top, then run the liquid through them in a small number of parallel loops (I'm thinking 2 chassis, 2 cover, so that the system can still run with the cover detached, but at reduced efficiency/increased temperature).

The motherboard, ram, and CPU will get blocks in all the thermal hot spots, the GPU and Infiniband adapter will also get their heat sinks replaced with low profile water blocks, and I want to get an external 12V PSU to connect to the motherboard to power everything, so the majority of PSU heat will be external as well.

So experts, any horrible flaws with this plan? Any suggested parts? any improvements? The goal is to have entirely fanless fluid cooling in a livingroom-ready chassis with only a few wires coming from it (Power, HDMI, Network(Infiniband) ) with zero noise
post #2 of 5
I doubt you can dissipate enough heat through the aluminum chassis and cover. Don't forget that the air inside the case will be quite a bit over ambient and will also be heating the chassis and cover. Then there's the heat the pump adds.

You may want to look at a thermosyphon to move the water and air through a rad and motherboard component blocks ( without a pump) using just gravity.
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
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My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
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post #3 of 5
Won't work without a pump of some sort.
post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

I doubt you can dissipate enough heat through the aluminum chassis and cover. Don't forget that the air inside the case will be quite a bit over ambient and will also be heating the chassis and cover. Then there's the heat the pump adds.

You may want to look at a thermosyphon to move the water and air through a rad and motherboard component blocks ( without a pump) using just gravity.

I couldn't find any production thermosiphon pumps available for purchase, but the concept seems simple enough to implement. I would be worried about maintaining sufficient flow rate with a custom solution, as my liquid engineering skills aren't that great.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtrapuzz View Post

Won't work without a pump of some sort.

Obviously. and a reservoir, and a fill port. I'm looking at cases with two external 5.25 drives now for a blu-ray mdisk drive and a 5.25 reservoir with fill valve.

Will such a computer produce significantly more thermal output than a 100 watt/channel 5.1 stereo receiver? the front channels are running about 40 watt RMS during nominal use. Don't have VU meters for the other channels. If the system heat is in line with the other components, the goal isn't necessarily icy cool temperatures, but rather true fanless operation, just like the receiver and other devices have. I've seen integrated cases designed for passive cooling that have dedicated heat pipes for thermal exchange through the chassis. But those are smaller systems designed for mini itx mobos that don't support GPUs or infiniband cards. I'm looking to replicate that on a larger scale with extra heat from the add-on cards. I know the theory is sound, but the implementation definitely needs some refinement before I try to do this.
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
The only added complication I see is that the times that I increase power usage above nominal for the PC (streaming/playing games) will be the same times I want to increase thermal output from the amplifier as well (Turn up the volume), so those temperatures might need to be more carefully monitored, even if nominal operation works. One problem at a time though, right?

It looks like so far one vote for "Too much heat" and one for "Add a pump". Anybody tried something similar before that I might be able to study and learn from? search isn't very fruitful on this subject.
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