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Adding aluminium fins to a copper skived heat sink?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Hi all,

Basically I have this tiny beast (see pic) but the cooling is very poor, to the point where it throttles a lot. I have replaced the fan with a much bigger one but it really needs to be much cooler.

The limiting factor of course is the size of the heat sink (~75 x 80 x 10mm), which is an usual size and shape so I can't just get one off the shelf. So, before I go on and do a crazy full custom loop, I'm wondering is there any simple & DIY-feasible way of add aluminium fins to the copper skived heat sink? I think this will help significantly if it's possible.

Can I just like, stick a bunch of 1mm aluminium sheets between the copper fins and apply some TIM on it? I guess it's not that simple is it?

Thanks.

post #2 of 22
you mentioned a custom loop. does that mean you the solution you are looking for does not have to fit inside the restriction of 75x80x10 size? is this unit going inside a container of some sort that allows for larger cooling solutions to be attached onto the chip?
post #3 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by wywywywy View Post

Hi all,

Basically I have this tiny beast (see pic) but the cooling is very poor, to the point where it throttles a lot. I have replaced the fan with a much bigger one but it really needs to be much cooler.

The limiting factor of course is the size of the heat sink (~75 x 80 x 10mm), which is an usual size and shape so I can't just get one off the shelf. So, before I go on and do a crazy full custom loop, I'm wondering is there any simple & DIY-feasible way of add aluminium fins to the copper skived heat sink? I think this will help significantly if it's possible.

Can I just like, stick a bunch of 1mm aluminium sheets between the copper fins and apply some TIM on it? I guess it's not that simple is it?

Thanks.


I believe if you do the above, heat will not have a place to escape. The heatsink is designed to radiate heat, using those channels. What is running so hot that warrants the additional cooling? Have you tried re applying some quality TIM to the current heatsink? What are temps now?
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post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by wywywywy View Post

Hi all,

Basically I have this tiny beast (see pic) but the cooling is very poor, to the point where it throttles a lot. I have replaced the fan with a much bigger one but it really needs to be much cooler.

The limiting factor of course is the size of the heat sink (~75 x 80 x 10mm), which is an usual size and shape so I can't just get one off the shelf. So, before I go on and do a crazy full custom loop, I'm wondering is there any simple & DIY-feasible way of add aluminium fins to the copper skived heat sink? I think this will help significantly if it's possible.

Can I just like, stick a bunch of 1mm aluminium sheets between the copper fins and apply some TIM on it? I guess it's not that simple is it?

Thanks.


I believe if you do the above, heat will not have a place to escape. The heatsink is designed to radiate heat, using those channels. What is running so hot that warrants the additional cooling? Have you tried re applying some quality TIM to the current heatsink? What are temps now?
My System
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Ryzen 5 1600 Asrock B350 Fatal1ty ITX Asus GTX1060 G.Skill 8gb 3000mhz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
250gb Samsung 850 Pro SATA LG DVD Burner Windows 10 Pro X64 23" Asus 144hz 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Microsoft Ergonomic 4000 EVGA 500w Gold EVGA Hadron Air Logitech G Pro 
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Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
250gb Samsung 850 Pro SATA LG DVD Burner Windows 10 Pro X64 23" Asus 144hz 
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post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by psyclum View Post

you mentioned a custom loop. does that mean you the solution you are looking for does not have to fit inside the restriction of 75x80x10 size? is this unit going inside a container of some sort that allows for larger cooling solutions to be attached onto the chip?

That's right. I'm willing to compromise on size because at the moment it's not really usable.

We're talking about 90C+ under average load here frown.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaivorth View Post

I believe if you do the above, heat will not have a place to escape. The heatsink is designed to radiate heat, using those channels. What is running so hot that warrants the additional cooling? Have you tried re applying some quality TIM to the current heatsink? What are temps now?

It's a 65W TDP CPU (i7-4770R) plus a northbridge chip, in total it peaks to over 85W. You can see why this OE heat sink is nowhere near good enough. Yes I have already changed the TIM and it made no difference.

Below is a better pic of what I'm trying to cool.

Another way is use a flat copper bar (around 30x60x10mm) on the chips as a cold plate, then mount a normal heat sink (e.g. Noctua NH-L9i) on top. But I'm worried that it's actually going to make it worse due to the thickness of the cold plate.

post #6 of 22
What is this thing?
I'm having a hard time understanding the full copper cover over PCB with only TIM contact with center. It looks like the copper piece is upside down in last pic. What is the black square with silver square in it's middle to the left of center? Is the white square on right side of copper a themal pad or insulation?
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

What is this thing?

It's an NUC machine.
Quote:
I'm having a hard time understanding the full copper cover over PCB with only TIM contact with center.

The CPU uses TIM, the northbridge uses thermal pad.
Quote:
It looks like the copper piece is upside down in last pic.

Yes it is. This is the disassembled pic. For assembled, see pic in the first post.
Quote:
What is the black square with silver square in it's middle to the left of center?

On the PCB? It's VRM.
Quote:
Is the white square on right side of copper a themal pad or insulation?

Thermal pad for the northbridge.
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
More pics (from Computerbase.de)



post #9 of 22
Okay, if I'm seeing things correctly then, you need a heatsink on Northbridge and on CPU chip / chips.

You say something like NH-L9i will work on CPU. Why does it need to be spaced up on 10mm shim? Is the NH-L9i base too small to cover chips?

It looks like the CPU mount is not standard 75mm spacing ??
post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 
It needs to be 10mm in height to clear all the components (specifically the VRM).

No it doesn't use anything standard, because it's an NUC --- hence my quest to finding something suitable!

The NH-L9i is about as big as the board.

Here is a pic to show you the size. The PCB itself is only around 100x105mm.

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