Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Air Cooling › Adding aluminium fins to a copper skived heat sink?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Adding aluminium fins to a copper skived heat sink? - Page 2

post #11 of 22
Okay, so if using NH-L9i you would need to vent the top to supply (or exhaust) the cooler.

Does the fan you are using now have an isolated intake / exhaust airflow? How long does it take CPU to reach max temp under heavy load? It takes very little warm air leaking into cool airflow to cause temps to rise. I'm thinking maybe the fan you have with isolated airflow might be enough.

Sorry for so many questions, but I'm trying to look at this from all angles.
post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 
I'm using a Noctua 92mm PWM on the copper skived heat sink at the moment.

And the NH-L9i does not fit, unless I use a 10mm thick copper bar to raise it, which I'm reluctant to do because I suspect it's going to be worse than it is now.

It only takes 10 seconds of Prime95 to get to 90C with the fan on 100%. This OE copper heat sink can hardly cool a 35W part, let alone a 65W part.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by wywywywy View Post

I'm using a Noctua 92mm PWM on the copper skived heat sink at the moment.

And the NH-L9i does not fit, unless I use a 10mm thick copper bar to raise it, which I'm reluctant to do because I suspect it's going to be worse than it is now.

It only takes 10 seconds of Prime95 to get to 90C with the fan on 100%. This OE copper heat sink can hardly cool a 35W part, let alone a 65W part.
The stock blower fan will move much more air than a 92mm radial fan. Centrifugal fans build much more pressure than axial fans, and the stock heatsink fan needs to overcome lots of pressure to push the air through all those little slots .. which is why it came with a centrifugal fan. wink.gif

But if the case is not designed to keep the cool air separate from the heated air it's not going to run cool enough.
post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 
Sorry I should have mentioned - it's not a case. Because when it's in, it idles at 60C.
post #15 of 22
Not sure I understand.
It's not in the case now?
It idles at 60c in the case?

then what does it idle out of case?

But back to the axial vs centrifugal fan. The centrifugal fan should do a much better job than axial. Honesly, not joke, serious as a heart attack.
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by wywywywy View Post

Sorry I should have mentioned - it's not a case. Because when it's in, it idles at 60C.

not sure if this is the direction you want to go towards

http://www.eteknix.com/akasa-max-s-passive-cooled-max-s-nuc-chassis-review/

it's something to consider. i don't know if your mobo will even fit in that chassis since you have a later model NUC then the listed compatible mobo for that chassis, but it's a start in sending emails in asking.

IF your mobo will actually fit (even if with some modification) in that chassis, it wouldn't be hard to strap a quiet 120mm fan on that relatively large heatsink chassis to cool the chip down.
post #17 of 22
Thread Starter 
Perhaps this following pic will explain how I have it currently. And I should have shown this pic in the first place.



It's a 92mm Noctua NF-A9 PWM strapped onto the board. Next to it is the original & broken case. Right now it runs cooler and quieter than the original, but is still very poor.

While I agree that a centrifugal fan will be better than an axial fan in its default configuration, it's not the case if the axial fan is much bigger than the centrifugal fan. Also the blower fan runs at something like 4000 rpm at max load and is like a jet engine.

My goal, if possible, is to have it at 80c load with fan on around 1500rpm.

The copper heat sink is limiting factor and I need to improve it. Hence my original question of adding aluminium fins to copper heat sink.
post #18 of 22
this is why i recommended the new chassis for your NUC. the entire upper side of the chassis is essentially a large aluminum heatsink. it's designed to run the NUC passively, but if you want better performance you can easily strap a fan onto the aluminum case/heatsink. since the heatsink on the chassis is significantly larger and has far more mass then the copper heatsink that came with your NUC, it should be able to draw more heat away from the chip since it has far more heat capacitance and surface area then the stock heatsink.

it is an investment but i think it will easily achieve your goal (assuming your NUC mobo can be mounted onto the chassis) so it may not be a bad idea to email them to see if your NUC will fit in their chassis.

here is a quote from the review i linked above
Quote:
Here you can see a raised section of the aluminium base of the chassis, this acts as the heat sink for the CPU hardware, which then passes the heat through the entire chassis housing to cool the system; very clever and completely silent cooling.


the chassis IS the heatsink for the NUC and with the amount of aluminum on there it's likely going to work well even as a passive unit. i wouldn't be surprised if the chassis can keep the unit cool passively with light duty such as watching youtube or something.
post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 
Yes many thanks for the idea. Much appreciated. It's already been done here - http://www.silentpcreview.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=68226 but as you can see there's quite a bit of machining involved and is not a straight swap. But I will keep it in mind! Thank you.
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by wywywywy View Post

Yes many thanks for the idea. Much appreciated. It's already been done here - http://www.silentpcreview.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=68226 but as you can see there's quite a bit of machining involved and is not a straight swap. But I will keep it in mind! Thank you.

that one required machining to fit the NUC inside their ITX chassis(euler model). the one I linked is specifically designed for NUC's(max s model). it's smaller then the one you linked (which is made for ITX mobo instead of NUC mobo.)

assuming the mobo on the NUC has not changed much since they designed the chassis. you might be able to slip that NUC mobo right into the chassis.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Air Cooling
Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Air Cooling › Adding aluminium fins to a copper skived heat sink?