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Is there a point to mirroring an SSD?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I'm curious if the risk factor of drive issues is so much lower for SSD's that there is little point to a mirrored RAID? So if I had an 850 EVO would it be worthwhile to get another drive and mirror it?
post #2 of 9
It is unlikely you will run into problems in any short period of time.
Also you should have backups of all of your data anyway.

I run crashplan on my laptop and it pushes backups to my server which has parity protected raid via unraid.
You should always have backups of data, and also raid is not backups.
post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by thrasherht View Post

It is unlikely you will run into problems in any short period of time.
Also you should have backups of all of your data anyway.

I run crashplan on my laptop and it pushes backups to my server which has parity protected raid via unraid.
You should always have backups of data, and also raid is not backups.

Exactly. The only time you need to mirror a drive is to help ensure continuous operation if the drive being mirrored should fail. Mirroring a drive will not protect your data from accidental deletion, viruses, etc. since the mirror will also have the same problems. Click on the top link in my signature for more on this from Sean Webster, OCN's resident drive guru.
     
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post #4 of 9
Hi @RoddimusPrime!

You can create a RAID 1 if you want of course, but I personally would prefer to set them up as two separate storage locations and go with a good backup strategy as well. That's because you'll lose half of the available capacity in order to get some additional redundancy, while on the contrary when you use them in combination with a HDD/external/NAS regular backup the risk of data loss is significantly less than when using RAID 1 alone and you have all the available capacity at the same time.

One good backup strategy I can recommend you for instance is 3-2-1 which stands for 3 copies on two separate locations and 1 offline.

Hope this helps and feel free to ask any questions you may have. smile.gif
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the feedback everyone.
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thrasherht View Post

It is unlikely you will run into problems in any short period of time.
Also you should have backups of all of your data anyway.

I run crashplan on my laptop and it pushes backups to my server which has parity protected raid via unraid.
You should always have backups of data, and also raid is not backups.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

Exactly. The only time you need to mirror a drive is to help ensure continuous operation if the drive being mirrored should fail. Mirroring a drive will not protect your data from accidental deletion, viruses, etc. since the mirror will also have the same problems. Click on the top link in my signature for more on this from Sean Webster, OCN's resident drive guru.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MightyMiroWD View Post

Hi @RoddimusPrime!

You can create a RAID 1 if you want of course, but I personally would prefer to set them up as two separate storage locations and go with a good backup strategy as well. That's because you'll lose half of the available capacity in order to get some additional redundancy, while on the contrary when you use them in combination with a HDD/external/NAS regular backup the risk of data loss is significantly less than when using RAID 1 alone and you have all the available capacity at the same time.

One good backup strategy I can recommend you for instance is 3-2-1 which stands for 3 copies on two separate locations and 1 offline.

Hope this helps and feel free to ask any questions you may have. smile.gif

I currently have a Synology NAS (4 drives). I have had a decent amount of occasions where it was less than easy to use, unresponsive, or simply had a drive fail on me. Of course, it was fine that one drive failed because I inserted another and it rebuilt the data as it should. So maybe one day I will either look for something a lot more responsive and reliable or build my own server computer. The problem with the latter options is it is often more costly and I want to keep it in a small form factor with highly reliable software.

The other thing I would like to do is find places online to backup various data. For example, I can have all my photos and videos go to one location, while my documents live elsewhere (including design files). And somewhere else for my music files. Obviously, I believe that would lead to multiple solutions. But, I have run into a lot of issues where sites don't store the original file type and instead downgrade it (like with photos or music) or make things very inaccessible. I was contemplating to continue to use Flickr for photos, Google for my own ripped CD's, and am still looking for a long term place for files and videos.
post #7 of 9
keep in mind that trim doesn't work with raid 1
post #8 of 9
I would advise using drive pool setup with SSDs simply because RAID is highly inefficient way of doing things (writes in chunks which is far from ideal with NAND). In drive pool (assuming connected to a HBA or RAID controller in HBA mode) any SSD is treated as normal drive which you can for example access with vendor tools (like Samsung Magician).

In RAID array most controllers doesn't allow any data to be accessed by the OS (TRIM/SMART/sometimes even temperature). There is not much problem with no-TRIM (I've run numerous SSDs on RAID controllers in RAID 10 mode without TRIM and never suffered any problems performance wise). Probably worst thing you can do is run SSD in parity based array (5/6/50/60). It will wear NAND lifespan much quicker because of constant parity calculations/writes.

Keep in mind that RAID is no supplement for backup and it does not prevent user from deleting or overwriting wrong file. There is no substitute for cold-(off-line)-backup.

At this moment in time I trying to move away from HDDs and move to SSDs for my main workstation. I love drive pool setup. You can chop and change, no need to buy paired disks, no need to buy expensive RAID version edition or anything like that. Discovered drive pooling 2 years ago and by today I have only one sole remaining 5TB RAID 1 (not for long, perhaps 2 months) setup while all other stuff has been moved to drive pools. Since transfer I've never looked back as RAID outlived it's usefulness with massive multi-TB drives.
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ypsylon View Post

I would advise using drive pool setup with SSDs simply because RAID is highly inefficient way of doing things (writes in chunks which is far from ideal with NAND). In drive pool (assuming connected to a HBA or RAID controller in HBA mode) any SSD is treated as normal drive which you can for example access with vendor tools (like Samsung Magician).

In RAID array most controllers doesn't allow any data to be accessed by the OS (TRIM/SMART/sometimes even temperature). There is not much problem with no-TRIM (I've run numerous SSDs on RAID controllers in RAID 10 mode without TRIM and never suffered any problems performance wise). Probably worst thing you can do is run SSD in parity based array (5/6/50/60). It will wear NAND lifespan much quicker because of constant parity calculations/writes.

Keep in mind that RAID is no supplement for backup and it does not prevent user from deleting or overwriting wrong file. There is no substitute for cold-(off-line)-backup.

At this moment in time I trying to move away from HDDs and move to SSDs for my main workstation. I love drive pool setup. You can chop and change, no need to buy paired disks, no need to buy expensive RAID version edition or anything like that. Discovered drive pooling 2 years ago and by today I have only one sole remaining 5TB RAID 1 (not for long, perhaps 2 months) setup while all other stuff has been moved to drive pools. Since transfer I've never looked back as RAID outlived it's usefulness with massive multi-TB drives.

I will have to look into drive pooling and see what it is, pro's and con's, and what is required. I also am unsure if it's a good idea versus just using a drive(s) normally. And yes as far as backup goes RAID is best for performance in HDDs or minimal downtime in case a drive fails. There are much better backup practices via cold, online, and off site options.
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