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<Apparently> blown VRM on MSI Reference 780Ti. Possible to replace?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hiya guys. I recently upgraded to a 1070 Gaming X and I was wondering whether if there was a chance my previous card could be brought back to life.

Apparently the reference 780Ti I had been using till about 1 and a half month ago passed away after giving me a few shorts at boot up. I rememer it all happening like this..It all seemed to start with me taking out the card out of my system to work it all out a little cleaner (I had a PCIe x1 IDE controller whose ribbon used to block airflow a bit...)... and leaving the card on the desk since I had no time and a meeting that night. Going on...

Well, day after that I return to put it back into the rig, connect the same 6pin/8pin PEG connectors I always used, aaaalll nice and smooth. Then I when I'm going to power it up, bzzz, I was greeted by a short. I said what? maybe it was just the cable/12v rail from my PSU. Okay, different 1x6/8 cable connected to different 12v PCIE PSU rail... no dice... still shorting...

Third try, friend and I take the whole system out of the case. I come across a 16mb ATI All-in-Wonder 128 PCI and we decide to use it as our test subject, cool. Connected back the essentials, then with finger on PSU's switch we power on and.. I boot into BIOS. hell yeah! we thought, it seems at least the rig isn't dead!. Very secured we went on a final attempt with the 780Ti placed on slot 1, connected both PEG connectors, we power up the system and, we greeted by no video and... seeing the oh so filthy smoke n' sparks coming out from the VRM area. Immediately flicked the HCP-1200s switch. Card's dead.

I can't take the cooler out of the card at the moment since I currently don't have any 'star shaped-tip' screwdriver to do so, but at least I wanted to taok a pic of the burn mark for your watching.

Would greatly appreciate any help thumb.gif since I love using CRT's for some old-school lo-res gaming action a la 640x480(Quake games and so on) and the Pascal series cards unfortunately don't come with the necessary RAMDACs for VGA support frown.gif - active DP to VGA adapters introduce tons of lag.




Thank you all smile.gif
post #2 of 9
Sure its possible to repair it but its not something a home user can do. Such tiny surface mount components are hard to replace and who knows what else this short took out on the PCB. For all you know other things could be blown while looking normal/not burnt.

Bottom line, it can be repaired with enough money but the question that comes up is it worth repairing considering its value?

A repair like this would have to be at a specialist who has the PCB schematics and a hot air station. Not cheap at all.
Unless you have all the tools/components/know how yourself, its not worth fixing it.
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post #3 of 9
Unless you have professional tools and knowledge otherwise I'd recomend you to buy a new card.

Once the vrm blew other components may have been damaged, etc if the core was damaged then nothing can fix the card, unless you put a new one in
post #4 of 9
Naa, it's toast. There's too much heat damage to the PCB there, and you have to remember these boards are multi-layer, you don't know what hidden tracks are now shorting at the damaged part of the board. Time to renew I'm afraid.
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by L36 View Post

Sure its possible to repair it but its not something a home user can do. Such tiny surface mount components are hard to replace and who knows what else this short took out on the PCB. For all you know other things could be blown while looking normal/not burnt.

Bottom line, it can be repaired with enough money but the question that comes up is it worth repairing considering its value?

A repair like this would have to be at a specialist who has the PCB schematics and a hot air station. Not cheap at all.
Unless you have all the tools/components/know how yourself, its not worth fixing it.

There is barely anything small enough on a GPU that you can't do with a soldering iron and a pair of tweezers.

OP You can try to replace stuff but I wouldn't trust it honestly. It is hard to say what all is really bad. If you wanted to spend the time with a DMM you could map a lot of it out but that would take hours.
post #6 of 9
the GPU's PCB itself seems to have been burnt through as well, its a no go as this PCB is multi-layered.
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAxVIPER View Post

There is barely anything small enough on a GPU that you can't do with a soldering iron and a pair of tweezers.

OP You can try to replace stuff but I wouldn't trust it honestly. It is hard to say what all is really bad. If you wanted to spend the time with a DMM you could map a lot of it out but that would take hours.

Easier said than done. Even with steady hands, you have to be experienced to work with the small components on a GPU PCB.
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-6950X X99 Deluxe ASUS GTX Titan Black 32GB @ 3200 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
Samsung 960 Pro Windows 10 Pro x64 Dell UltraSharp U3014 Microsoft SideWinder X4 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
Corsair AX860 NZXT Switch 810 Mionix Castor Asus Xonar STX + 2x LME49860NA OPs + HD650s 
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What
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-6950X X99 Deluxe ASUS GTX Titan Black 32GB @ 3200 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
Samsung 960 Pro Windows 10 Pro x64 Dell UltraSharp U3014 Microsoft SideWinder X4 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
Corsair AX860 NZXT Switch 810 Mionix Castor Asus Xonar STX + 2x LME49860NA OPs + HD650s 
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post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Totally, this really seems like a no-go then. redface.gif Are there still any relatively good performing cards on the market that happen to go at least for sub 200 (used/nib) whilst still having compatibility for driving VGA signals natively?
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by xGTx View Post

Totally, this really seems like a no-go then. redface.gif Are there still any relatively good performing cards on the market that happen to go at least for sub 200 (used/nib) whilst still having compatibility for driving VGA signals natively?

if it has a DVI-I out, they'll support VGA by using a generic passive adapter.






Edited by epic1337 - 8/6/16 at 8:20pm
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Overclock.net › Forums › Graphics Cards › NVIDIA › <Apparently> blown VRM on MSI Reference 780Ti. Possible to replace?