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post #11 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tw1tCh View Post

Well I just moved some fans around and have a 140mm blowing directly at the VRM's, though a bit more stable(made 3 passes on AVX IBT set to very high before locking up this time, usually locked up on the second pass) still not enough to keep those things cool enough. This might actually be the limit on this board, which is pretty disappointing considering Gigabyte claims it's designed to handle this chip.

When you say "blowing directly at" does this mean from a short distance away or like this? Mounted directly to. It makes a difference as does exact physical placement (slight tilt or angle). 2 to 3 inches away and you can loose the affect Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Reason I ask is usually a 140mm doesn't have that much pressure/rpm even when directly mounted to the HS, and I'm surprised you can fit it in this close. This is a 90mm 2100 rpm I had laying around in the pic.

This is usually what I see with a Giga vs 9xxx. It may run one at default but when it comes time to OC they seem a little weak in the knee.
Remember too that OCing a 9xxx isn't just a breeze even with a CHV-Z. If you had any idea how long it took me to stabilize the OC you see in my rig sig it would surprise you.


Make very small changes than test thoroughly before going further. These chips come OC'd so any increases will take a lot of patience and time to test for stability compared to a 8xxx.

Something more to consider as far as stability goes, these Very High runs/tests are only short tests. Not a very good sign of real stability but if you could pass 20 runs set to Maximum at least than you could call it gaming stable. It all depends on what you're needs are. For me after the 20 run max tests I move into 24 hr Prime95 testing.

Work on those temps and fans and get those mobo temps down first.
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post #12 of 43
Thread Starter 
The fan isn't quite on top of the VRM like in your case. I have mine blowing from the top of the case down, set at a slight angle towards the VRM. In my case there is a space between the top of the case and the motherboard so the fan fits just over top and a little behind the board too so I think, at least I did, that there would be enough air passing over. I should probably snap a pic when I get home.

I might try making a shroud to force air across the heatsink this week and see if that helps.

and by the sounds of it, it seems I couldn't have picked a more difficult chip to learn OC'ing with lol.
post #13 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tw1tCh View Post

by the sounds of it, it seems I couldn't have picked a more difficult chip to learn OC'ing with lol.

Well... I can think of one other one that might be lol. rolleyes.gif
Either a 8350 or 8370 would have been a wiser choice to learn with.


The 9xxx series has all the early/easy work handled for the most part which takes a lot of the fun outta the game for someone new to OCing. Only reason I bought this one was due to being bored of my 8350.
Got playing around a short while back and managed this http://valid.x86.fr/j3gwy1 (just lucky it validated lol)
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post #14 of 43
looks like you attracted at least one knowledgeable person, but i will still give you what i have learned from my experience with a FX 9590 on a mostly custom water loop my 5ghz "reference"

http://valid.x86.fr/shkhbb

first off, drop that stock vcore from 1.55v, its way to high for any kind of premade cooler short of a fully custom water setup. <- the SINGLE most important thing to do when OCing an FX-9000 series, their stock vcore is way to high, even when i use 5.2 ghz i don't use that much vcore. (1.5-1.52v)

i would suggest you try between 1.45v-1.52v core, to keep the heat down. the problem alot of people run into with these chips is that they apply alot of voltage to get a higher clock ceiling, but all they are really accomplishing is tons of extra heat that causes the chip to thermally throttle and downclock/become unstable thus defeating the purpose of adding extra voltage. a good OC with any FX chip is a balance of clocks and voltage to keep the heat down and maximize performance.

in a word, i find high voltage holds me waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay back because of run away temperature.

secondly you can hit 5ghz stable with a h100I or comparable SLC, you might have to run the fans pretty near max tho.

- set HTT to 2600 with a small bump in voltage

- set NB to 2400 or 2600 if you can get away with it, depending on your mobo you may need around 1.2v-1.3v, i don't recommend going higher then 1.35v (at all) on the nb because it causes ALOT of extra heat in the CPU as an aftereffect

- make sure your RAM is set to stock timings and voltage, i don't recommend overclocking RAM with an FX chip if it requires extra voltage to keep the ram OC stable, again because this extra voltage will bleed into the CPU and cause more heat.

- use the one step at a time method, set your CPU to its max stock turbo (4.7 ghz) and REDUCE the core voltage until it becomes unstable (probably in the 1.35-1.42v range) to find the MINIMUM voltage necessary, then using that voltage inch your way up. increase the multi 1x, test for stability, if fail up vcore one notch, repeat until you are stable at that multi, then increast the multi again, you should find that you can hit 5 ghz easily and may even be able to hit 5.1-2 ghz with tweaking.

- a small (think within 0.1v+ of stock) bump on the NB and HTT voltage can help tremendously with stability, but it is a very fine line between just enough and to much (extra heat). do play around with both to find the best mix of Vcore, HTTv and NBv

- do not try to go right for crazy HTT and NB speeds like 2800-3200+ right away, firstly they don't really help with FX IPC's as they did with Phenom II's, DO run your HTT at least 2600 because you have a fairly powerful video card, and you may see SOME benefit trying to hit 2800+ on the HTT to feed your video card. but do that AFTER you get your CPU overclock squared away.

also try not to pop your PSU, im pretty sure your AOK but an OC'd FX can really work even a good 12v rail.

let me know how it goes
Edited by Mellifleur - 8/15/16 at 11:21pm
post #15 of 43
Mellifleur is right.

For example, the 9590 can easily run at the stock 4.7Ghz with only 1.42 volts, it could vary between chips but the stock voltage is obviously way to high, and that is what can cause most of its problems.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mellifleur View Post

- set NB to 2400 or 2600 if you can get away with it, depending on your mobo you may need around 1.2v-1.3v, i don't recommend going higher then 1.35v (at all) on the nb because it causes ALOT of extra heat in the CPU as an aftereffect

Mellifleur, I'm interested in that, I have never been able to get it stable with a NB higher than 2200, but mostly because I don't know which voltage to raise in ASUS Motherboards. There is CPU/NB voltage, there is NB voltage, and NB HT voltage, is very confusing because the NB voltage shows warning since reaching 1.2 volts.
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post #16 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krnt View Post

Mellifleur is right.

For example, the 9590 can easily run at the stock 4.7Ghz with only 1.42 volts, it could vary between chips but the stock voltage is obviously way to high, and that is what can cause most of its problems.
Mellifleur, I'm interested in that, I have never been able to get it stable with a NB higher than 2200, but mostly because I don't know which voltage to raise in ASUS Motherboards. There is CPU/NB voltage, there is NB voltage, and NB HT voltage, is very confusing because the NB voltage shows warning since reaching 1.2 volts.
Keep your HT speed higher than your NB speed (e.g. 2400NB/2600HT or 2600NB/2800HT). I'd try raising NB Core voltage not NB voltage. Try NB Core at 1.3 (under load). If it's stable then drop the voltage and test until it's not.
post #17 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tw1tCh View Post

The fan isn't quite on top of the VRM like in your case. I have mine blowing from the top of the case down, set at a slight angle towards the VRM. In my case there is a space between the top of the case and the motherboard so the fan fits just over top and a little behind the board too so I think, at least I did, that there would be enough air passing over. I should probably snap a pic when I get home.

I might try making a shroud to force air across the heatsink this week and see if that helps.

and by the sounds of it, it seems I couldn't have picked a more difficult chip to learn OC'ing with lol.
With the UD3P board I have I've found that having some angle (out of the case) is better than having a fan flat above the sink, so the hot air can be expelled out of the case. However, I've also found it helps to get not just the upper part of the sink in the airflow but the whole thing. I'm currently using a 140mm fan that I've tied but I still get awful temps at 4.7 (88–90C under Prime). The Stilt suggested replacing the stock thermal pad with a better-quality pad which probably is a very good idea. I just need to get to it.
post #18 of 43
its your motherboards plorbem I reckon, this is not good enough for a 220w cpu oc. Also try leaving Load line calib on normal and standard this may let you clock higher than 4.8ghz prime stable.
I had 990 ud3 r5 and to go past 4.8ghz and run prime stable I have to use normal/standard llc otherwise it will not run. Althought I can get 5.02GHZ with a 9370 and 990 ud3 r5, my vrms overheat wihin 3 minutes and my cpu starts throttling
post #19 of 43
The most optimal LLC setting for Gigabyte boards is typically Medium. I have tested the other settings and they are clearly inferior to Medium with the UD3P. Medium has the smallest gap between minimum and maximum, keeping power delivery less erratic. The amount of voltage needed to stabilize is lower as a result.
post #20 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by superstition222 View Post

The most optimal LLC setting for Gigabyte boards is typically Medium. I have tested the other settings and they are clearly inferior to Medium with the UD3P.
I'm not trying to imply that LLC is best on normal but saying that theres a bug with some gigabyte mobos. With the 220w amd cpus and running prime past 4.8GHZ stable the LLC must be set on normal
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