Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Linux, Unix › Dual-booting Linux and Win7 on Desktop, need help making some decisions on how and where to install Ubuntu
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Dual-booting Linux and Win7 on Desktop, need help making some decisions on how and where to install Ubuntu

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I'm currently in the process of wiping my desktop, reinstalling Win7, and also installing Ubuntu 16.04 alongside it. My desktop has a 120GB SSD (really 111GB), and a 1TB HDD (really 931 GB) for storage. My plan, as it stands now, is delete all the partitions and reformat and repartition as follows:

 

SSD: 

~55GB - NTFS, Win7, OS, drivers, and critical programs and files only

~55GB - Ext4, Ubuntu 16.04, OS, drivers, and critical programs and files only

 

HDD:

~465GB - NFTS, Storage for Win7

~465GB - Ext4, Storage for Ubuntu

 

The setup for Windows should be fairly straightforward in terms of where I'm putting certain folders and such. Basically, everything that isnt system critical is going there. All my games, my music and media, etc. 

 

The issue I have is with Linux. I have barely any experience using it. Everything I know I know from the very limited time I used it when it was dual booted on my laptop next to Win8/10. I mostly stuck to Windows. I know how to install it in the mostr straightforward way possible, a little bit about the file system and how to install programs, and thats it. I want to learn and be proficient in using Linux as an OS because I'm going into software dev., and I have to assume at some point I will be working in a Linux environment. Plus I've been wanting to do it for myself for a while. What I plan to be doing on Linux will be everything else I did on Windows. Web surfing, writing, listening to music, writing papers, taking notes, presentations, programming, database work, etc. Basically everything I did before but gaming. I want to gbet to the point where I can switch back and forth between both OSes and be equally proficient and know my way around. I chose Ubuntu because from everything I saw, it offered the best user friendliness for learning, but will still be useful for power users.

 

When I installed Linux on my laptop, it was just one mount point, /. Everything in one partition. From what all I've read and seen, a lot of people will create multiple partitions for different directories, for various reasons. My question is this: givenmy knowledge, what I want to be doing, and my storage setup, how should I going about mounting my Linux installation? I tried to be as detailed as possible, if you need more info, please ask.

post #2 of 17
Thread Starter 

I don't know if this would help answer my questions, but I do not understand at all how the directory structure works, or at least, what goes where and what each directory under / is for (its hard when they have names like /bin, /srv, /var, etc). I'm used to the Windows directory structure, which is compeletely different. And I unforunately haven't yet found a good explanation that clearly explains it, though maybe I'm just asking too much. So maybe it would be best for me to just put everything on one partition and then reconfigure once I get more experience.

post #3 of 17
/bin is basically short for binaries, /sbin is the location for binaries that are only run by root, /dev is devices (the system hardware) /srv is ... come to think of it this is all explained in detail here.

I honestly want to scream every time someone mentions dual boot as if though it were a good idea. It's not, it's awful, and the only sane reason I can think of wanting to dual boot is if you absolutely must have direct hardware access from your guest OS, but if your goal is just to learn to be proficient at Linux then that's not necessary. A better solution is to use VirtualBox. Why? Well, for one, you don't have to mess with partitioning and boot schemes (which are a total nuisance for users of all experience levels) because you just need to create, use and destroy virtual drives which are also nice and portable.

Another major benefit of virtualizing is that you have access to both OS at once. It's too much hassle having to exit one OS and reboot just to use the other one. Why settle for only being able to do things in one OS at a time when you could instead treat Linux as an application within Windows and have unfettered access to both OS at once? Heck, I'm writing this post in a Linux VM, which also points to another benefit of virtualization: Sandboxing/security of applications. All in all, virtualizing is THE way to go except for a few niche situations in which dual booting would be more sensible.

Finally, user-friendly is not what you want if you're trying to get proficient. In a professional capacity, proficient Linux users are expected to be able to do pretty much everything/anything required from the command line alone. So Ubuntu Server would help you more than the desktop version, but even better would be using something like Arch Linux that forces you to learn some of the fundamentals off the bat and that makes it easier to keep adding knowledge down the line.
Black & Green
(12 items)
 
Dev Box
(7 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X6 1090T ASRock 970 Extreme3 Gigabyte GTX 750 Ti mushkin Blackline PC-12800 DDR3 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung 850 EVO Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO Debian -nosystemd- LG Flatron 
KeyboardPowerMouseAudio
MechanicalEagle Z-77 Corsair CS650M Kinzu V2 Pro Asus Xonar Essence STX 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
Core2 Duo E7400 Asus P5Q Hyper-X  Sandisk 
OSPower
Fedora 22 Thermaltake 650W 
  hide details  
Reply
Black & Green
(12 items)
 
Dev Box
(7 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X6 1090T ASRock 970 Extreme3 Gigabyte GTX 750 Ti mushkin Blackline PC-12800 DDR3 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung 850 EVO Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO Debian -nosystemd- LG Flatron 
KeyboardPowerMouseAudio
MechanicalEagle Z-77 Corsair CS650M Kinzu V2 Pro Asus Xonar Essence STX 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
Core2 Duo E7400 Asus P5Q Hyper-X  Sandisk 
OSPower
Fedora 22 Thermaltake 650W 
  hide details  
Reply
post #4 of 17
Win 7 and Linux is OK. Win 8 & 10 not so good. I ended up with with win 8 on a 480 SSD and Linux Mint 14 on a 120 SSD. You still have to add linux after the Win install. Redmound WA is Still home to those who can screw up code easier than they create code that don't screw up. Some of it is intentional.
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petrol View Post

/bin is basically short for binaries, /sbin is the location for binaries that are only run by root, /dev is devices (the system hardware) /srv is ... come to think of it this is all explained in detail here.

I honestly want to scream every time someone mentions dual boot as if though it were a good idea. It's not, it's awful, and the only sane reason I can think of wanting to dual boot is if you absolutely must have direct hardware access from your guest OS, but if your goal is just to learn to be proficient at Linux then that's not necessary. A better solution is to use VirtualBox. Why? Well, for one, you don't have to mess with partitioning and boot schemes (which are a total nuisance for users of all experience levels) because you just need to create, use and destroy virtual drives which are also nice and portable.

Another major benefit of virtualizing is that you have access to both OS at once. It's too much hassle having to exit one OS and reboot just to use the other one. Why settle for only being able to do things in one OS at a time when you could instead treat Linux as an application within Windows and have unfettered access to both OS at once? Heck, I'm writing this post in a Linux VM, which also points to another benefit of virtualization: Sandboxing/security of applications. All in all, virtualizing is THE way to go except for a few niche situations in which dual booting would be more sensible.

Finally, user-friendly is not what you want if you're trying to get proficient. In a professional capacity, proficient Linux users are expected to be able to do pretty much everything/anything required from the command line alone. So Ubuntu Server would help you more than the desktop version, but even better would be using something like Arch Linux that forces you to learn some of the fundamentals off the bat and that makes it easier to keep adding knowledge down the line.

It is also worth noting that if you really want some real world experience that would help in modern sysadmin environment you might even look at setting up XEN or Vsphere hypervisor in Linux and running Windows in a paravirtualized environment and passing your graphics hardware to it. The "gaming VM" as it is referred to affectionately. This is a pretty common task in modern Linux Sysadmin environments - VMs with direct or shared hardware access. Obviously not typically used for gaming, but the skillset translates very well. It also removes the need to dual-boot entirely and keeps you on Linux for your daily driver. Just fire up the gaming VM when it's time to play some games that don't work well on Linux. You can even use low latency VNC with no compression on a loopback interface so that Windows shows up as just a Window on your Linux desktop, which you can then toggle fullscreen and have a seamless environment. These types of goals and ambitions when you start out, given motivation and dedication will teach you more than you'll ever learn just trying to use Linux as your daily driver. Chances are if you can think of something you'd like to do on Linux you probably can. I'm always learning new stuff, and pushing the envelope of what I'm capable of - and I've been running Linux as my daily driver since 2006.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i7 920 D0 4.2ghz HT (1.3625v) Asus R3E 2xGTX 460 (non SLi, no overclock) 6x2gb G.skill @ 6-8-6-24-1T 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
WD-VR 300GBx1, 2xWD 1tb,2x60gb Agility Some crappy combo burner... Arch x64 3xDell U2410f rev A02 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
X-Armor U9BL TT Toughpower 1200w (NTB more efficient) Mountain Mods Pinnacle 24 CYO Roccat Kone (R.I.P. A4Tech x7) 
Mouse Pad
Steelpad Experience I-1 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i7 920 D0 4.2ghz HT (1.3625v) Asus R3E 2xGTX 460 (non SLi, no overclock) 6x2gb G.skill @ 6-8-6-24-1T 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
WD-VR 300GBx1, 2xWD 1tb,2x60gb Agility Some crappy combo burner... Arch x64 3xDell U2410f rev A02 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
X-Armor U9BL TT Toughpower 1200w (NTB more efficient) Mountain Mods Pinnacle 24 CYO Roccat Kone (R.I.P. A4Tech x7) 
Mouse Pad
Steelpad Experience I-1 
  hide details  
Reply
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petrol View Post

/bin is basically short for binaries, /sbin is the location for binaries that are only run by root, /dev is devices (the system hardware) /srv is ... come to think of it this is all explained in detail here.

I honestly want to scream every time someone mentions dual boot as if though it were a good idea. It's not, it's awful, and the only sane reason I can think of wanting to dual boot is if you absolutely must have direct hardware access from your guest OS, but if your goal is just to learn to be proficient at Linux then that's not necessary. A better solution is to use VirtualBox. Why? Well, for one, you don't have to mess with partitioning and boot schemes (which are a total nuisance for users of all experience levels) because you just need to create, use and destroy virtual drives which are also nice and portable.

Another major benefit of virtualizing is that you have access to both OS at once. It's too much hassle having to exit one OS and reboot just to use the other one. Why settle for only being able to do things in one OS at a time when you could instead treat Linux as an application within Windows and have unfettered access to both OS at once? Heck, I'm writing this post in a Linux VM, which also points to another benefit of virtualization: Sandboxing/security of applications. All in all, virtualizing is THE way to go except for a few niche situations in which dual booting would be more sensible.

Finally, user-friendly is not what you want if you're trying to get proficient. In a professional capacity, proficient Linux users are expected to be able to do pretty much everything/anything required from the command line alone. So Ubuntu Server would help you more than the desktop version, but even better would be using something like Arch Linux that forces you to learn some of the fundamentals off the bat and that makes it easier to keep adding knowledge down the line.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xaero252 View Post


It is also worth noting that if you really want some real world experience that would help in modern sysadmin environment you might even look at setting up XEN or Vsphere hypervisor in Linux and running Windows in a paravirtualized environment and passing your graphics hardware to it. The "gaming VM" as it is referred to affectionately. This is a pretty common task in modern Linux Sysadmin environments - VMs with direct or shared hardware access. Obviously not typically used for gaming, but the skillset translates very well. It also removes the need to dual-boot entirely and keeps you on Linux for your daily driver. Just fire up the gaming VM when it's time to play some games that don't work well on Linux. You can even use low latency VNC with no compression on a loopback interface so that Windows shows up as just a Window on your Linux desktop, which you can then toggle fullscreen and have a seamless environment. These types of goals and ambitions when you start out, given motivation and dedication will teach you more than you'll ever learn just trying to use Linux as your daily driver. Chances are if you can think of something you'd like to do on Linux you probably can. I'm always learning new stuff, and pushing the envelope of what I'm capable of - and I've been running Linux as my daily driver since 2006.

Okay. Well, my newb is clearly showing. i feel like at this point it would be better to start a new thread. But since I at least seen to have a few people attention, I'll stay here. 

 

So, as it stands right now. my situation is this:

My Laptop already has been set up. Half the drive to Windows, half to Ubuntu. Forunately I have basically nothing on either of them right now because I just finished my set up last night. So, it would be very easy to reformat and reinstall whatever I want. 

 

I guess the best place to go from here is back. heres what I want out of each of these machines

Laptop: On the go. I want to be able to use it for all general purpose uses (web browsing, email, Microsoft Office/LibreOffice), light gaming (hearthstone, minecraft, etc), and be able to do any and all programming and software development work I want to do. For instance, before I redid everything, I had a Eclipse Mars installation set up for Java/C++, and  MySQL database running for database stuff I wanted to do. I had a few other programs (such as BlueJ for Java debugging). I'm still in college and am not too deep in at that, so my needs right now are simple.

Desktop: Basically everything above, plus heavy duty gaming. 

 

The reasons I've been wanting to start using linux are twofold. 

1. I've long been interested in learning how to use it. Right now I consider myself a power user of Windows to an extent, or at least extremely familiar with a big chunk of it. I would like, purely to satisfy myself, to become as proficient as that in Linux. 

2. (This is an assumption on my part, so correct me if I'm wrong). I want to build my resume. If I can put down that I am able to nbot just use linux as a regular daily driver, but develop software in and for it, and even do some sysadmin stuff, then IMO, that would be a huge boon to my resume. So, not just learn how to poke around the file system, but a full and deep understanding and knowledge. I know enough about computers to know it is way better to know understand how andy why things work the way they do, than just what to type and where to click.

 

While I understand I am not going to gain all that knowledge and experience in a month or a year or even a few years, I want to set myself up at the beginning for success. The reason I went with the dual boot option, is that it was honestly much easier for me to dual boot. It took me barely any work to figure out how it worked, how to do it and achieve what I thought was the best result. So I guess laziness was the root cause of my choice. Plus I always considered VM as some sort of esoteric art of people much better than me at computers. I have no clue where I would even start to learm how to set one up. The concept alone is all I understand.  

 

So, with all that in mind, I will pose two questions:

1. Considering both my complete lack of experience with any other OS but Windows, and also my goals in terms of my level of knowledge of Linux, what distro/distros would you recommend?

2. Considering my use goals right now, and the hardware I have to work with, which is better: dual booting or VM? If VM, where would I start?

post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 

I guess a TL;DR for the above post would be: If I was wanting to achieve a high level of proficiency, knowledge and understanding of Linux  (being able to work exclusively in command line, able to develop applications in and for Linux enviroments, sysadmin experience, etc), starting with no experience with the OS but willing to work, what distro's would be best. And if I wanted to do this while also doing development and work in a windows environment, would it be better to dual boot, or use VM?

post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamMeeDee View Post




While I understand I am not going to gain all that knowledge and experience in a month or a year or even a few years, I want to set myself up at the beginning for success. The reason I went with the dual boot option, is that it was honestly much easier for me to dual boot. It took me barely any work to figure out how it worked, how to do it and achieve what I thought was the best result. So I guess laziness was the root cause of my choice. Plus I always considered VM as some sort of esoteric art of people much better than me at computers. I have no clue where I would even start to learm how to set one up. The concept alone is all I understand.  

So, with all that in mind, I will pose two questions:
1. Considering both my complete lack of experience with any other OS but Windows, and also my goals in terms of my level of knowledge of Linux, what distro/distros would you recommend?
2. Considering my use goals right now, and the hardware I have to work with, which is better: dual booting or VM? If VM, where would I start?

IMHO only recently has VM been a good option for running Linux in Windows which is the smarter direction for those expecting to learn Linux from a Windows background. Xaero's points are very good ones but only after one has become comfortable in Linux. I dual boot, or rather multiboot (I currently have 7 OpSys on this box) still and partly because I have done so since 1991) . It is just no big deal or any sort of problem for me since I cover my butt with redundant bootloaders (multiple drives) stick to MBR Legacy mode rather than UEFI and always install bootloaders to /root or /boot on all OpSys so any problems/corruption/failures are easily resolved with a simple rescue/boot disk and pointing to the desired partition from the bootloaders command line.

The point is your instincts seem fine to me. Ubuntu is a decent beginners choice and dualbooting is a viable option with a long history.

Given your goals of actually understanding "the nuts and bolts" behind the scenes, I strongly suggest you get some books. There are many Ubuntu books, just get one that is new since Ubuntu does change over time more than base Linux, like Arch, Slackware, Gentoo, etc. The most important thing you can do, especially if you'd enjoy getting comfortable in a few months time, is to get the O'Reilly book Linux in a Nutshell . It is IMHO simply indispensable in learning command line (CLI) which is where the greatest power and flexibility resides). Windows barely even mentions CLI and nerfs it to prevent user-caused damage. You do need to read about commands so you minimize any possibility of damage but thankfully even that isn't a big deal since as long as the kernel exists and you have a rescue disk, one almost NEVER has to reinstall. Everything is fixable from Single UserCommand/Text Mode, often referred to as Maintenance Mode and that is worst case. Commonly a rescue disk will put you right back at the very least to MultiUser CLI if not the full Desktop.

While not required, a good set of tools that work for both Linux and Windows is a big help. I like Hirens BootCD. It has a PE Windows GUI as well as Dos/linux command tools and a full Linux GUI as well with a terrific set of tools for both. Just below I'll leave links for O'Reily and Hirens along with my wishes for Good Fortune and success.

There might be a newer version out now but this is still viable for Hirens
Hirens 15.2 Boot CD - Tools Galore

This is O'Reilly's Nutshell. It is also available as a free pdf but I recommend the hard copy unless you have a tablet, kindle or something so you can have it apart from your main PC.
Linux in a Nutshell

Note - In case you are yet unaware, a pointy-clicky icon is simply a graphic representation of an executable, whether a single command or a macro script. The point is that some commands may have thousands of possible permutations, due to multiple customizable switches and options, and to have them all just for that one command would take thousands of icons. The Nutshell book lists those switches and options, with examples, and though the "man" (short for "manual") command is a huge benefit, most beginners and even pros find a hard copy easier to work with.

Allow me to present to you an example you can likely relate to from Windows experience. Linux doesn't "put all the eggs in one basket" like the Windows registry does but this will still illustrate how powerful and fast CLI is. If you've ever had to manually clean up old leftover entries in the Registry with Regedit, you know what a colossal pita it is to "Find" your way through each and every entry when there are commonly 10s if not 100s of them. With a single command, sed (short for serial editor) one can delete any and all references, say to "Norton AntiVirus" in mere seconds and one push of the "Enter" key.

Ubuntu is more like Windows in it's attempt to be "User Friendly" (which really means "keep you ignorant") but "underneath the hood" it is still Linux and offers you immense power, configurability, speed, and flexibility. At first you will likely find yourself booting back to Windows where your comfort zone is but he more you fight to stay in Linux the sooner you will hate booting Windows and feeling safe, large and in charge in Linux.

best wishes Cuz

PS - Just read your latest TLDR and quite naturally I suppose I'd recommend Slackware or Arch as being less "pointy-clicky" and with higher overall quality of documentation and advice. Because Ubuntu was designed to be an easy migrate from Windows googling for answers to problems will very often put o in the "blind leading the blind" situation which just rarely occurs with more serious distros. There are a lot more Arch fans here than Slack fans, but for various reasons, it is my regarded opinion that Slack is far more Vanilla so that experience in it ultimately applies everywhere with occasional exceptions for systemd, still a matter of some controversy.
Edited by enorbet2 - 8/12/16 at 4:48pm
NewMain
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 - 3550 Asrock Z77 Extreme4 Evga GTX 1070Ti  4x2GB Corsair Vengeance 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Seagate SATA 2TB x 2  Plextor PX-891SAW CM-Hyper N520 Slackware 14.2 MultiLib, Slackware 14.0 32 bit,... 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
32" Vizio HDTV + DLP Logitech Wireless Corsair HX-850 Antec Sonata I 
MouseMouse PadAudioOther
Razer DeathAdder 2013 dual ESI Juli@ CoolGear ExtSata Enclosure w/ Optical and 3TB S... 
  hide details  
Reply
NewMain
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 - 3550 Asrock Z77 Extreme4 Evga GTX 1070Ti  4x2GB Corsair Vengeance 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Seagate SATA 2TB x 2  Plextor PX-891SAW CM-Hyper N520 Slackware 14.2 MultiLib, Slackware 14.0 32 bit,... 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
32" Vizio HDTV + DLP Logitech Wireless Corsair HX-850 Antec Sonata I 
MouseMouse PadAudioOther
Razer DeathAdder 2013 dual ESI Juli@ CoolGear ExtSata Enclosure w/ Optical and 3TB S... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

Okay, in the case I go with dual booting, which is what I'm leaning toward, how should I go about mounting the thing, considering I have two hard drives and I would like to make use of both of them? I know that about half of the directories in Linux are contain only system stuff, which I would probably put on my SSD, but directories like /home, /usr, etc. I would think I put on my HDD because that's where user data would end up? If so, which directories do I mount to each drive?

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by SamMeeDee View Post

Okay, in the case I go with dual booting, which is what I'm leaning toward, how should I go about mounting the thing, considering I have two hard drives and I would like to make use of both of them? I know that about half of the directories in Linux are contain only system stuff, which I would probably put on my SSD, but directories like /home, /usr, etc. I would think I put on my HDD because that's where user data would end up? If so, which directories do I mount to each drive?

I would only make separate partitions for /boot / (root) and /home. It's also beneficial to have Windows and Linux on separate drives and to install the linux boot loader to the linux drive so the windows boot loader isn't disturbed.
Boinc Desktop
(14 items)
 
CrunchAholic
(8 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Ryzen 7 1700X ASRock X370 Taichi Gigabyte GTX 970 G1 HyperX Predator 
Hard DriveCoolingCoolingCooling
Hyper Predator M.2 Watercool Heatkiller IV PRO AM4 CPU Block EKWB GTX 970 GPU Block EKWB Coolstream XE 240 Radiator 
CoolingCoolingOSPower
EKWB Coolstream PE 360 Radiator Watercool Heatkiller 150mm Tube Res Gentoo Linux EVGA 850 G2 
CaseMouse
Thermaltake View 31 Tempered Glass RGB Edition Roccat Kone EMP 
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
Intel Xeon E5-2670 Intel Xeon E5-2670 Asrock Rack EP2C602 XFX RX 480 RS 
RAMHard DriveOSPower
64 GBs Samsung M939B1K70CHD-CH9 PC3-10600R Samsung HD322HJ Arch Linux Corsair AX1200 
  hide details  
Reply
Boinc Desktop
(14 items)
 
CrunchAholic
(8 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Ryzen 7 1700X ASRock X370 Taichi Gigabyte GTX 970 G1 HyperX Predator 
Hard DriveCoolingCoolingCooling
Hyper Predator M.2 Watercool Heatkiller IV PRO AM4 CPU Block EKWB GTX 970 GPU Block EKWB Coolstream XE 240 Radiator 
CoolingCoolingOSPower
EKWB Coolstream PE 360 Radiator Watercool Heatkiller 150mm Tube Res Gentoo Linux EVGA 850 G2 
CaseMouse
Thermaltake View 31 Tempered Glass RGB Edition Roccat Kone EMP 
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
Intel Xeon E5-2670 Intel Xeon E5-2670 Asrock Rack EP2C602 XFX RX 480 RS 
RAMHard DriveOSPower
64 GBs Samsung M939B1K70CHD-CH9 PC3-10600R Samsung HD322HJ Arch Linux Corsair AX1200 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Linux, Unix
Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Linux, Unix › Dual-booting Linux and Win7 on Desktop, need help making some decisions on how and where to install Ubuntu