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Noctua NH-D15S vs NH-U12S

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Just wondering how much of a difference both of these coolers will provide under load with LGA2011 Xeon processors that do not support overclocking. From what I've read so far is that at higher overclocks and higher voltages the difference becomes about 5 degrees approximately under maximum load.

I plan on using it with the industrial series of fans from Noctua (120mm 3000rpm) and was wondering whether the IP67 24v is compatible with LGA2011 motherboards or even the fan headers or should I get the normal ip52 version 3000rpm fan.

The difference in price is about $20 between each other so while it's not significant the D15S also looks like it will be much harder to connect the fan clips when LGA2011 motherboards have the PCI express slot very close to the memory. My case will support the D15S and the U12S but seeing as how these Xeons can't be overclocked (well they can but only with base clock and a small insignificant amount) is it worth paying the extra for the D15S?
post #2 of 5
What is the TDP of your Xeon? There are coolers much better than NH-U12S for about the same price, While Noc fans are generally good, they are also half again to twice as expensive as others just as good and sometimes better.

We really need to know what your system is; case, mobo, GPU, case fans, etc. Then we can give educated guesses of what will work best.

You might find 'Ways to Better Cooiing' link in my sig of interest. 1st post is index, click on topic to see it. 5th is a good place to start.
post #3 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by 45nm View Post

Just wondering how much of a difference both of these coolers will provide under load with LGA2011 Xeon processors that do not support overclocking. From what I've read so far is that at higher overclocks and higher voltages the difference becomes about 5 degrees approximately under maximum load.

Could split the difference and select the U14, although the U12 will be fine on a stock-clocked Xeon - they don't get near their 140W limit until running AVX2 benchmarks. The benefit of the U14 over the U12 is the 140mm A15 fan vs the F12 120mm. The 140mm is much, much quieter and smoother while delivering more air flow. It's the same 140mm used with the D15S.

What is your planned usage for the Xeon? Are you getting one of the server-pull, insanely cheap 26xx V3 models?
Quote:
Originally Posted by 45nm View Post

I plan on using it with the industrial series of fans from Noctua (120mm 3000rpm) and was wondering whether the IP67 24v is compatible with LGA2011 motherboards or even the fan headers or should I get the normal ip52 version 3000rpm fan.

The 24V models work fine on a 12V header - just run at half speed - which is a good thing. I prefer them to the 12V industrials because of lower top rpm - and they're lower priced where I live. Still not quite as smooth as the chocolate 'n cream models tho. Ehume review here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 45nm View Post

The difference in price is about $20 between each other so while it's not significant the D15S also looks like it will be much harder to connect the fan clips when LGA2011 motherboards have the PCI express slot very close to the memory. My case will support the D15S and the U12S but seeing as how these Xeons can't be overclocked (well they can but only with base clock and a small insignificant amount) is it worth paying the extra for the D15S?

If you love the sight of lots of fins in the morning (I know I do), then the D15S is great - it has an offset base, so shouldn't interfere with the PCIe slot. As with any cooler, the fan clips are optional. Ziptie screws work just as well and less visually distracting from those beautiful rows of fins.

The U12S will work fine, but you may (will) want to replace the F12 with a smoother, quieter fan, like a PWM GT or or even Noc's own P12. The F12 is one of my least favourite Noctua fans - much noiser than the P12 while not performing much better. So...the cost saving would be lost.

The U14S is a good 'tweener option. As well as the long list of anything-but-Noctua coolers @doyll will provide - it is a long list, right?

And as he has stated, repeatedly, good case air flow is key to optimizing the performance of any air cooler.
post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 
I ended up going with the Noctua D15S. I figured that even though though there is a price difference with it it should handle any future upgrades or overclockeable processors I can have enough spare TDP capacity in reserve so it can handle both workstation, desktop and server processors in the future.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MicroCat View Post

Could split the difference and select the U14, although the U12 will be fine on a stock-clocked Xeon - they don't get near their 140W limit until running AVX2 benchmarks. The benefit of the U14 over the U12 is the 140mm A15 fan vs the F12 120mm. The 140mm is much, much quieter and smoother while delivering more air flow. It's the same 140mm used with the D15S.

The reason why I didn't include the U14S is because it will block the first pci express slot which is something that I considered when looking at that model. It's on Noctua's compatibility lists that it blocks it on many motherboards. The D15S and U12S don't have that issue at all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MicroCat View Post

What is your planned usage for the Xeon? Are you getting one of the server-pull, insanely cheap 26xx V3 models?

I use the Xeon for a wide variety of tasks including gaming, development, editing, etc... It is an E5-2670 one of the cheap Sandy Bridge-EP models that really came down in price once the market was flooded in the thousands as datacenters and companies upgraded their LGA2011 V1 Xeons. The E5-26XX V3 model is on my list for the future.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MicroCat View Post

The 24V models work fine on a 12V header - just run at half speed - which is a good thing. I prefer them to the 12V industrials because of lower top rpm - and they're lower priced where I live. Still not quite as smooth as the chocolate 'n cream models tho. Ehume review here.

I replaced the NF-A15 fan with the Noctua NF-F12 industrial ippc 3000rpm version as it has better cfm and better static pressure application than the NF-A15 from what I understood. I also configured a quiet/standard bios profile so I rarely see the rpm rise beyond 2000rpm (or even beyond 1500rpm in typical light tasks).
Quote:
Originally Posted by MicroCat View Post

If you love the sight of lots of fins in the morning (I know I do), then the D15S is great - it has an offset base, so shouldn't interfere with the PCIe slot. As with any cooler, the fan clips are optional. Ziptie screws work just as well and less visually distracting from those beautiful rows of fins.

I absolutely love the Noctua D15S. I was a bit unfamiliar with a cooler of this size and it took me a bit longer to install it (I hope I didn't over-tighten the thumbscrews or the spring loaded screws) and it was a bit-tricky to get the 4-pin PWM connected even with the clearance. In my LGA2011 motherboard it gives me about a centimetre of clearance

Also is there a good guide or tutorial on how to use the fan clips on the NH-D15S? I just used the spare fan clips that came with the cooler and attached it to the Industrial 3000rpm 120mm fan and pulled it until it clipped on but it seems a bit tight and a bit difficult to remove from the cooler like a spring (not like what I have seen in the videos). Perhaps I may have overextended it.
post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by 45nm View Post

I ended up going with the Noctua D15S. I figured that even though though there is a price difference with it it should handle any future upgrades or overclockeable processors I can have enough spare TDP capacity in reserve so it can handle both workstation, desktop and server processors in the future.
The reason why I didn't include the U14S is because it will block the first pci express slot which is something that I considered when looking at that model. It's on Noctua's compatibility lists that it blocks it on many motherboards. The D15S and U12S don't have that issue at all.
I use the Xeon for a wide variety of tasks including gaming, development, editing, etc... It is an E5-2670 one of the cheap Sandy Bridge-EP models that really came down in price once the market was flooded in the thousands as datacenters and companies upgraded their LGA2011 V1 Xeons. The E5-26XX V3 model is on my list for the future.
I replaced the NF-A15 fan with the Noctua NF-F12 industrial ippc 3000rpm version as it has better cfm and better static pressure application than the NF-A15 from what I understood. I also configured a quiet/standard bios profile so I rarely see the rpm rise beyond 2000rpm (or even beyond 1500rpm in typical light tasks).
I absolutely love the Noctua D15S. I was a bit unfamiliar with a cooler of this size and it took me a bit longer to install it (I hope I didn't over-tighten the thumbscrews or the spring loaded screws) and it was a bit-tricky to get the 4-pin PWM connected even with the clearance. In my LGA2011 motherboard it gives me about a centimetre of clearance

Also is there a good guide or tutorial on how to use the fan clips on the NH-D15S? I just used the spare fan clips that came with the cooler and attached it to the Industrial 3000rpm 120mm fan and pulled it until it clipped on but it seems a bit tight and a bit difficult to remove from the cooler like a spring (not like what I have seen in the videos). Perhaps I may have overextended it.

Congrats on the D15S. It's a great cooler. With a great stock 140mm fan. Or so I thought. I have a D15 on my OC'd 4.5Ghz Xeon 5675 and keeps it cool and quiet during long stressful renders. Or so I thought.

The Nocuta mount has springs so it can't be over-tightened. You can relax. Altho if you bust the screw off with your server room strength thumb torque...

The A15 fan that comes with the D15S is one of the best 140mm fans and engineered to work with the D15. The Industrial 120mm F12, may have better paper specs - but only because it spins up to an ear-crushing 3000rpm. At lower rpms isn't as strong as the A15, while being far more noisy with a rougher, more coarse sound profile. If the noise isn't bothering you, then don't listen to my loud protests for more silent performance. biggrin.gif

The stock 140mm will cool the Xeon just as well as the industrial noise unit. If it's a visual thing, and you don't want the chocolate 'n cream scheme, then suggest the 140mm NF-A14 industrialPPC-24V-3000 IP67 - It matches the rpm range of the A15, but in chic black.

The D15/S are designed to work optimally with 140mm fans - for low noise and great cooling, could add a 2nd A14 and connect both with the LNAs. However if you have your fins set on 120mm spinners, check out the Darkside PWM GTs. The GTs are legend for strong airflow/static pressure at humane sound levels.

The D15/D15s fan clips are the easiest I've used. Here's a good how-to from @ehume's D15 review
On other coolers I usually resort to Ziptie screws rather than the fingertip slicers most vendors provide. tongue.gif
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