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Book(s) to further my html/css + others?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I'm still on codecademy, trying to finish up the free html/css lessons. (Been slacking...) I had in mind, that when I finished the free lessons, that I would get book(s) to review what I had learned at codecademy, then start back up learning.

I was wanting to make a RSS sight with logins and comment n such, but after being told something about making a stack, I'm not sure if I should go for something bigger or not. (Have not looked up what a stack is, I don't want to get disencouraged from learning what I am)

Here is the book or book set I was looking at. It's kinda like a picture book lol.
https://www.amazon.com/Web-Design-HTML-JavaScript-jQuery/dp/1118907442/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1471299737&sr=8-2&keywords=css+html
Does anyone want to recommend me any books, for learning html/css + others?

Is jQuery apart of JavaScript? php was recommended to me by a member. Would it replace JavaScript & jQuery?
Some things to note, is that I'm not really at all looking to spend any money on any editors or anything like that. If it can't all be done in notepad ++ or KATE, I will need a free alternative, or to learn a different language.

Thanks,
Higgins909
post #2 of 7
Personally I wouldn't buy books on this topic, but it's up to you realy.

jQuery is a Javascript library that extends the capabilities of Javascript.

Depending on what you are doing, jQuery may make life a little easier.

You dont have to learn PHP, there are alternatives;
  • Perl: a mature, cross-platform language that can be hard to understand
  • ASP: Microsoft’s powerful, Windows-based framework
  • Cold Fusion: a powerful, tag-based option for non-programmers
  • PHP: a cross-platform, open-source alternative with lots of features built in
  • Java: the ultimate in power and flexibility, for serious programmers

but not all are free and they vary in difficulties.

You'd have to learn one of them if you want to do something beyond a basic, static website.

I'd read into each of them to make a decision.
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post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by spinFX View Post

You dont have to learn PHP, there are alternatives;
  • Perl: a mature, cross-platform language that can be hard to understand
  • ASP: Microsoft’s powerful, Windows-based framework
  • Cold Fusion: a powerful, tag-based option for non-programmers
  • PHP: a cross-platform, open-source alternative with lots of features built in
  • Java: the ultimate in power and flexibility, for serious programmers
.

A quick note... ASP has a language you use for the HTML portion, and either C# or VisualBasic(VB) in the back. DONT USE VB. NO ONE LIKES VB. PEOPLE WILL MAKE FUN OF YOU IF YOU USE VB (I would to my co-workers if they intentionally did it... but then again they might reply with a valid reason)

@
Quote:
Originally Posted by spinFX View Post

Personally I wouldn't buy books on this topic, but it's up to you realy.

Some people I know like reading books, but people like me like to go with the trial by fire approach.


I personally like to come up with an idea, and then making it happen. Something like, i want to make a page like Imgur.com, where people can upload and view pictures...I know how to read images from my system already, but how do i upload files? I then google "uploading files with PHP". I code my stuff and make it work. Now, how do i add security? Google, "how to add security with PHP"... and it just keeps going. You can even go with the basics of, googling "types of loops in PHP", "Arrays and lists in PHP".

As for languages... i would avoid Perl because its not really used anymore. If your wanting to build up a marketable skill, ASP,PHP,or Java is the way to go. I know of ColdFusion, but I have never done or see examples of it. I personally am not a fan of Java, but that's mainly because I have not found an IDE (integrated development environment.... fancy program to help you code in) that I like for it. I believe Visual Studio has free editions that you can use to develop ASP .net webpages with, but it takes a little getting usto. PHP is the easiest one to jump into IMO. The only thing that is a pain is setting up Apache with PHP, but there are guides for that.

Ohh, i guess i forgot to note ... if you run this on your computer, you need something that these will run on. Visual Studio will come with IIS so that you can run your ASP page locally, but to run Java I recommend using Tomcat which runs on top of Apache (works out of the box), and PHP needs to have Apache installed as well as the PHP installed and then configured them to work with each other (not sure if you can find this bundled).


But in the end, i still recommend going with JavaScript (JavaScript IS NOT JAVA). No need for anything fancy, and Chromes debug tools are AWESOME.


As for resources, Refer to this page. http://www.overclock.net/t/1270646/programming-language-learning-resources-list/0_50

EDIT: ALSO check out http://www.overclock.net/t/1233652/web-development-tutorials/0_50
Edited by Mrzev - 8/19/16 at 5:17am
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post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
What if I need to talk to a mysql database? Will all of those work with it? to manage my mysql server, I installed phpmyadmin. It works for what I do, which isn't much. All of the database stuff I get from a premade file, but that's when I would host a arma 3 server that required a database. I know nothing about mysql programming or any of that. I was looking thought books and saw php and mysql, so thought I would ask if there were other languages that worked with mysql.

Edit
Mrzev, a bit confused now, does JavaScript do what php or python would do? I thought JS was more of a client side functionality, but would still need something like php or python to talk to the server?
/Edit

I watched a video and this one girl was using html css javascript, then python for the "back end systems" which I assume means server side.
Guess my goals are html css > javascript > php or python with more research > probably mysql.

The reason why I don't like java is because the games I've played that run it. (no idea what other common uses it has then the games I've played) That's minecraft and Wurm online. Netcode is bad or something, strange lag and huge bandwidth consumption. Ram hog, think it was only using 1 cpu thread, slow. Limit minecraft to 2gb and its up there using like 6gb ram... I'm getting quite off topic it seems...
Edited by Higgins909 - 8/19/16 at 11:52am
post #5 of 7
This is a good book for client side stuff, though you will want to know the basics first: http://learn.shayhowe.com/advanced-html-css/

NodeJS is JavaScript that runs on the server. The main advantage of it is that the client has to use JS (or JS powered language like coffeescript & typescript) and allows you to use the same language on both client&server, which can make things easier, especially if you are starting out (no need to learn a second programming language). There are some fairly nifty frameworks for NodeJS like Meteor that handle a fair amount of the boiler plate work that goes into setting up a website and have tutorials that guide you through all of the necessary pieces to getting a complete site done. You can always switch to something else once you get a handle on all of the pieces and best practices needed.

In addition to jQuery, you will also want to pickup a functional library like underscore or lodash for the client. Functional programming makes dealing with large amounts of data much easier. Example: you have an array of objects and you want the "id" field off each one, you can do _.pluck(myArray, "id") to get them vs doing all the boilerplate for a for loop that you can get wrong.

For mysql, you will want to do a few tutorials on SQL, which is the underlying language most relational databases use. When it comes time to actually use it, make sure you use parameters rather than string concatenation in your queries.
post #6 of 7
JavaScript is Client side... It will not let you read a database or any server based stuff. I recommend learning it because this is where you take a bit of a jump into programming itself. Doing things like writing loops, arrays, functions. Javascript does TONES for HTML pages and you typically still need to write a bunch when you move over to the server side scripting stuff. So, instead of jumping into multiple languages, i recommend taking that step first. I personally find debugging with javascript MUCH easier than PHP. (that might be because i dont have the right tools though). But for debugging Javascript and CSS, chrome is amazing.
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post #7 of 7
I work full time in web development (and have for several years now). The coolest thing about web development (to me) is that everything a beginner needs is available for free (and as an avid collector of programming books, I assure you that the best resources are also free). If you have an internet connection and a computer, you have all the tools it takes to learn. Here's a few things I think will help you on your way.

The hardest thing about learning any new occupation is knowing what questions you need to ask. Hopefully, after going through some of these materials, you will know which questions to ask (and maybe answer a few along the way). There are lots of other things you'll hear about like responsive design, JS Frameworks (React, Angular, Vue, Ember, etc), production tools (gulp, webpack, babel, etc), or testing (jasmine, mocha, chai, etc). These are all important, but not until you understand the basics and by the time you understand the basics, you'll know how to ask about these things and where to begin looking for the answers.

On the web resource front, MDN (Mozilla Developer Network) is good for both learning and reference (you'll use this one forever). CSS-tricks is amazing for CSS, but you'll need to use google to find anything aside from the almanac
Css-tricks almanac is a pretty useful resource (as is the rest of the site)

Here's three places in particular you may want to look at
Learning Center
Docs and Dev Guides
JavaScript

Crockford's The Good Parts is the only resource here that you'll have to pay for if you want to use it (but whenever you're making the big dollars, try to support the authors so we can all continue to have nice things).

Eloquent Javascript -- This should teach you all the basics of JS you need to know to get started
Exploring ES6 -- this will teach you the newest syntax of the language (make sure you know ES5 first because this builds on top of that)

A guy by the name of Eric Elliot wrote a couple of great posts that express what I would call "The Zen of Javascript" (Part 1, Part 2)

These books are much deeper looks at JS going from least to most in-depth (I recommend reading all of them and there isn't a ton of overlap)
Javascript Allonge -- Not too difficult book about the basics of functional programming
Dr. Boolean's Mostly Adequate Guide to Functional Programming -- moving from the basics to advanced practical functional programming
You Don't Know JS -- extremely in-depth exploration of the language

If you have already invested in learning JS, I suggest you start using it on the back-end. It's not the end-all server language some people claim (it is very good), but it's easier to learn the back-end when you aren't having to learn a new language at the same time. Node Up and Running should point you in the right direction on the server.

Git is ubiquitous in the web development community (and almost everywhere else). You MUST know git to do anything in the field. Learn Git Branching is a great, interactive way to learn the basics.

In the browser, you're going to want to inspect your webpage as it runs (a great way to try things out). This site should give you a decent look at what's possible. Here's specific docs for MS Edge, Chrome, and Firefox

I don't know what editor you use, but if you are using something like notepad or whatever, I'd suggest looking into the free Atom Editor. It's very popular and does everything you'll ever need (I've bought several editors from Sublime to IntelliJ and I still find myself using Atom for most things).

Servers basically all run on Linux and most web devs use either Linux or OSX, so learning the basics of Bash is important. I haven't used it (they didn't have such things when I was learning), but I've heard good things about this site.
Edited by hajile - 8/22/16 at 9:00am
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