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First time overclocking, new build! Questions about FX 8320E - Page 3

post #21 of 25
Also, if extreme LLC stabilized you that means your VCore in BIOS was set too low in the first place, most likely.

Medium LLC tends to be optimal for Gigabyte boards:

Take a look at the chart here:

http://www.modders-inc.com/gigabyte-990fxa-ud3-rev-4-0-motherboard-review/4/


The lowest possible VCore isn't necessarily the most optimal either. What you want to find is the golden amount of VCore that maximizes performance without wasting energy. That tends to be a small increment above the minimum stable. The error correction can make a chip seem stable, or even stabilize it, while hindering performance. Not having enough voltage will cause error correction to kick in, reducing performance.

I don't know how accurate they are but I've used LinX and Cinebench both to test the overall performance after finding a stable overclock. Cinebench is probably not optimal since it's so FPU heavy but LinX also doesn't put the same level of load on the system as Prime does. It would be nice if Prime were to have a benchmark in it. The best idea is probably to have a short video clip to digitize with Handbrake (after treating the program with the AMD optimizer) to test for performance.
Edited by superstition222 - 8/21/16 at 2:54pm
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferd View Post

found this table from 8320E review:
Anandtech is a rather hack-level site for overclocking in terms of their standard for stability:

They consider an overclock that fails an encoding stress test "stable enough" to publish as a successful overclock. This is ridiculous.

Also:

They use an open test bed, most likely with the fans on the AIO at maximum. Unless you really have superior airflow an enclosed case is generally a tougher condition for overclocking.

They only used OCCT and probably not for a long period of time. They didn't run Prime95 or Handbrake.

The amount of droop they were getting is high, which suggests they didn't take the time to find the optimal LLC setting.

There is no data about VRM temp so their "stable" overclock could quickly kill their board and CPU by frying the VRMs.

There is no data about NB Core voltage — which is just as critical as VCore for getting a stable overclock, especially if you use faster RAM or tighter RAM settings (or have to resort to BCLK overclocking thanks for a BIOS bug like with the UD3P board)

Anandtech's overclocking tends to be "Let's see how much VCore we can throw at something".
Edited by superstition222 - 8/21/16 at 2:51pm
post #23 of 25
I'm sorry but its hard to help if you don't listen carefully. Here is a step by step set up to get you started...



#1: Ignore the review...its just ballpark stuff and its not ideal on even the hardware they set up more than likely.


#2: Set your voltage to the stock voltage of 1.275...do not go lower than that on this first set of tests i'm going to walk you through.


#3: Turn off all the Power saving stuff for now. We can play with C&Q later. For now if you really want help follow this step by step. Off on turbo, SVM HPC APM C6 C1E and any other thing i might have missed.


#4 Lock your CPU-NB at 2200 and your HT at 2400/2600 depending on what your board allows. Lock CPU-NB voltage to 1.20v, and manually put your ram at stock speeds with stock timings if you know how. leave it alone after that until much later when we get you rocking on the CPU side.


#5: Put your CPU at stock of 3.2 and lock it down. Follow the procedure outlined below and you will get to a good starting place.


#6: Make a spread sheet using Excel or open office and down column A put every major setting from your bios...and in B every value you selected for it. This can get quite long and tedious but its worth its weight in gold if you do it. Make sure to save it to a flash drive or the cloud.


#7: Download P95 and or Intel Burn test. You can use any other tests you want but these 2 hold the most weight in the community here. When getting Prime 95 make sure you get Version 27.9, it is older but is optimized better for AMD hardware. Newer versions may not work as well.


#8: Record the following in your spread sheet:

avg idle temps of CPU/Socket/VRM after 10 min

min/max/avg idle voltage on CPU after 10 min

Run a 10 min stress test in P95

record whether it passed or not and what errors it showed if any

also max temp under load during the 10 min test

min/max/avg voltage of CPU under load during the 10 min test

#9 If it passed and you recorded everything bump your core to 3.4GHz and repeat. Record all results in the next column of your spreadsheet. Continue to do this until you fail a P95 test. Do not change any other settings besides clock speed during this testing.

#10: Once you fail a P95 10 min test for any reason look at the min voltage you were able to maintain under full load conditions and compare that to the current failed tests minimum. Try bumping the V core on the CPU up 1 or 2 clicks to keep the min Voltage one step above the value that is failing.

Repeat this process until you hit your thermal limits of your set up or are requiring more than 1.4125v to the CPU. Up to this value is completely safe to run as this is the Turbo voltage and is what runs through the board during brief periods of stock turbo speeds. Thermal limits are generally <70'C on Motherboard and Socket...and <60'C on the CPU itself. You can most certainly go higher in some cases on voltage and even temps, but these are generally considered super safe for OCing a 24/7 set up.

Good luck and make sure when you post pics of your set up to make them larger and easier to read.thumb.gif
post #24 of 25
I'm glad you followed my suggestion. wink.gif I recommend getting some kind of cooling. I wouldn't go extreme as 4.4 24/7 on that board is the best you can do without the bios bug. I recommend a hyper 212+ evo only because its $20 and keeps my FX 8310 @ 4.4 ghz in the 50's and will do up to 4.6 ghz in the low 60's thumb.gif
post #25 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I recommend getting some kind of cooling.

Got my Arctic A32 on the job! thumb.gif
Quote:
I'm sorry but its hard to help if you don't listen carefully. Here is a step by step set up to get you started...

Lots of advices in this thread... but in the end I did exactly what you described, except for I started at 1.16V (stock voltage on BIOS).
Quote:
Good luck and make sure when you post pics of your set up to make them larger and easier to read.thumb.gif

My bad, will use the Large image setting in the future rolleyes.gif
Quote:
My suggestion is to run Prime95 (ideally version 27.9) with custom FFT:

Ran both those tests for one hour without errors! Max temp on VRM was 72, on CPU was 43...
Quote:
The lowest possible VCore isn't necessarily the most optimal either. What you want to find is the golden amount of VCore that maximizes performance without wasting energy. That tends to be a small increment above the minimum stable. The error correction can make a chip seem stable, or even stabilize it, while hindering performance. Not having enough voltage will cause error correction to kick in, reducing performance.

Guess that explains why sometimes IBT was sometimes actually taking LONGER to complete at higher frequencies?
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