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[SPONSORED] ----- WING X99 ----- A CNC-milled Scratch Build! (Completed!) - Page 3

post #21 of 387
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gleniu View Post

Man, this is too much of metal beauty, I cannot handle it... drool.gif

Metal drool.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

drool.gifdrool.gifdrool.gifdrool.gifdrool.gifdrool.gifdrool.gif I have a serious case of tool envy!

Yeah, quite lucky that I have access to those tools. The cheapest ones in the "Dormer holder" costs about 30-40 USD (2mm endmills) and scaling to the most expensive, the 16mm end-mill that was 150+ USD. Ball-mills and chamfers are also more expensive than the end-mills in the same size. For example I believe the 2mm ball mill costs about the same as a 10mm endmill wich is about 75 USD. You really really do not want to break/drop or damage them in any way. Being really careful with them checking setups 2 or 3 times to avoid crashes. Nerve breaking every time biggrin.gif
Edited by Brodholm - 9/28/16 at 4:14pm
post #22 of 387
Thread Starter 

Yes getting the ore from the ground might be considering from the ground up, but close enough smile.gif


10mm casted (GS) PMMA/Acrylic plexiglass or whatever you want to call it!


Very big sheets, to big in fact. Next time I will be going for the much more convinent sizes of 1x2 meters. These are 2x3 meters...


Absolutely huge!


Time to cut these down!


As always, safety! Really important to protect your eyes. It is very easy to get dust/particles that is a pain in the ass to remove and worst case you get some framgent that can make you blind. ALWAYS use glasses when cutting material!


Lines and a aluminum guide plane! Can't go wrong then with that amount of safety. Really don't want to scrap these. They cost quite a bit...


Gap saw i believe its called in English.


The saw fits in the straight strip of extruded aluminium. And then follows that exact path for a very straight cut.

AIF71Ao.gif
Went really smooth and the cuts was very nice!


Lots and lots of these chips that become electrically charged when you cut. And they want to stick to everything!!!


10mm and 6mm sheets are all cut. Left half of each 2x3 meter sheets uncut. This will be more than enough for a while.


Time to get down to the harder stuff. Aluminium, got this special blade that is supposed to be designed for this purpose.


10mm aluminium EN1050A H111. I ended up not using these since they got heavy scratches after bad storage next to steel sheets!!! I was not happy about this but there was nothing to do other than getting new ones. This time I went for EN5754 H111, which is much harder and better for machining.


They are very nice and clean (But as I said, these got deep scratches in them now, rendering them useless for decorative work).


A bit nervous here. It's a 10 mm thick sheet of aluminium that is being cut with a tool designed mainly for woodworking and carpenters.

VrHZryN.gif
To my surprise it cut it like butter. Very impressed with the blade and the quality of the tool.





These are the new EN5754 sheets, very disappointed with the delivery. They came wet and have probably been stored like that for a while. The got this oxidation that needs to be removed with either sanding or polishing. Not what you want from a new sheet that you paid good money for.


It is not deep or something that can't be fixed. Its just a hassle, not like those 1-0,5mm deep scratches I got in the other plates (although that was not the suppliers fault but the workers at the workshop I am at)


This also... This is like an IKEA sticker nightmare. There was this thin sheet of paper between the sheets that is now one with the aluminium. Will probably have to use some alcohole or something to get this of. Sooooo much unnecessary work for me...


Believe me I will be making a call to our supplier to see what they have to say about this. They usually deliver everything in tip top shape with excellent quality.


Ohh well, I will get started with these plates anyway and if I can get new ones I will switch to those sheets as I progress.


Anyway, now everything is cut and ready to go on the CNC router. All sorted in different slots for different materials!


Next update will be some cutting action and finally production of the case can begin. Took a lot of steps to get here but I am ready to begin now. And all these delays with the material have enabled me to get all the components that is going into the chassis so I can really check that everything will fit nicely. And I have also improved the CNC a lot. And that should really speed up the milling process of the case. So all in all, they delays have not been all bad. These updates are sometimes lagging behind a few days due to the nature of editing both video and photos as of now. This should speed up when I get better routines as the updates progresses!

But my question to you is how you want these updates if you could chose. Will be a lot of milling and programming in CAM and also design setup etc. Would you like the whole process with video of me editing code, setting up sheets, doing preparations, video of the actual cutting (cut down into manageable segments etc). Myself I think that gifs for example is a very good substitute for video when there is only short segments that I need to visualize. What is your opinion? Let me know, I would really like to have everyone's thoughts on this smile.gif
Edited by Brodholm - 9/28/16 at 3:10pm
post #23 of 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brodholm View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

drool.gifdrool.gifdrool.gifdrool.gifdrool.gifdrool.gifdrool.gif I have a serious case of tool envy!

Yeah, quite lucky that I have access to those tools. I cheapest ones in the "Dormer holder" costs about 30-40 USD (2mm endmills) and scaling to the most expensive, the 16mm end-mill that was 150+ USD. Ball-mills and chamfers are also more expensive than the end-mills in the same size. For example I believe the 2mm ball mill costs about the same as a 10mm endmill wich is about 75 USD. You really really do not want to break/drop or damage them in any way. Being really careful with them checking setups 2 or 3 times to avoid crashes. Nerve breaking every time biggrin.gif

The tool bits are enough to be envious of but that CNC machine (excuse me while I go get the mop)! I would love to have something like that (among other machines) but I just don't have a place for them. Heck, I'm limited to using an 8" drill press because I have to be able to lug it in and out of storage and I just can't handle anything heavier without blowing out my back.

As if that wasn't enough to be envious of, you just had to go and get that Festool portable circular saw! Those things are sweet. However, even though I can afford one (assuming I give up eating; I need to go on a diet anyway), they are a little too heavy for me to handle easily (not to mention safely). I'm spoiled by my lightweight 18v 5 1/2" Ryobi portable circular saw.
     
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post #24 of 387
Great update. I love those gifs - great idea thumb.gif
We want more
   
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post #25 of 387
I don't even know what I'm looking at, but I like it!!! drool.gif
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post #26 of 387
Subbed!
post #27 of 387
You have done some fantastic work so far! I really look forward to seeing how this build proceeds! thumb.gif
     
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post #28 of 387
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

The tool bits are enough to be envious of but that CNC machine (excuse me while I go get the mop)! I would love to have something like that (among other machines) but I just don't have a place for them. Heck, I'm limited to using an 8" drill press because I have to be able to lug it in and out of storage and I just can't handle anything heavier without blowing out my back.

As if that wasn't enough to be envious of, you just had to go and get that Festool portable circular saw! Those things are sweet. However, even though I can afford one (assuming I give up eating; I need to go on a diet anyway), they are a little too heavy for me to handle easily (not to mention safely). I'm spoiled by my lightweight 18v 5 1/2" Ryobi portable circular saw.
Not my Festool saw but it runs like a dream. Wish I had one at home. They are sooooo pricey though! The Ryobi and Milwaukee stuff works just fine if you don't have to use them day in and day out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gleniu View Post

Great update. I love those gifs - great idea thumb.gif
We want more
More coming. Just need to edit them!!! Im not that good with Adobe premiere! Getting there though biggrin.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart View Post

I don't even know what I'm looking at, but I like it!!! drool.gif
You are looking at my blood sweat and tears CNC build and some other computer thing I cant remember rolleyes.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee0 View Post

Subbed!
Thanks mate!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simmons572 View Post

You have done some fantastic work so far! I really look forward to seeing how this build proceeds! thumb.gif
Thanks! Progress coming right up!
post #29 of 387
Thread Starter 
Update number 3!

First cuts on the project! Sure feels nice! I have not gotten around to edit the video footage. Gifs to be ninja added in the original post and a separate post I think. Also working on a youtube video. Hopefully it will be up later this weekend If I don't run into trouble with little to no experience using adobe premiere...

Tried to describe the whole process as good as I could. Took a looooong time so I will probably not do this every time. But I thought it would be good for those wanting to get into CNC! Hope you enjoy!




A fresh start, with a fresh spill board!


I use these small 12 mm hardened shafts to align the work piece to make sure it is parallel.


As you can see here the aluminium sheets gets pushed toward 2 of these to achieve perfect alignment along the Y axis.


Very soft aluminium clamps. Too soft maybe, but they usually scratch instead of the material.


Bottom side of the clamps. Allows for a range of about 2-10 mm thickness to be clamped.


I used six of these to secure a 8 x 300 x 1000 mm 5754 aluminium sheet.





Very flexible, I constantly have to bend these back when I get too rough with them. That's not good since they flex past the yield point and will eventually break. But I just have to make some new and improved versions then!


This is the part I am machining today. The very bottom part of the case.


4 mm polished end mill for soft metals like aluminium, brass, copper etc. Also suitable for plastic.


These are ER25 collets that holds the milling tools in place.


Here is a pack of them. Goes from 1 mm to 16 mm. And to the right you can see the special tool that fits over the "clamp nut" (name?) that squeezes the collets and consequentially squeeze the tool.


Here it is, fastened in the spindle.


No rush, measure everything twice. And then again to be sure. Then doubt yourself and measure again


I am centering the program on the bottom left corner. I need to make sure I don't have a collision with the holding clamps and also don't go too far.


The chassis is 235 mm wide. This means I have about 20 mm of space left on each side for the tool path (takes about 12 mm on all passes on each side) and the clamps.


The contour cuts, and holes are made on the main/first side I mill. The lines you see here are tool path lines.


About to plunge down into the aluminium!


Contact!


Here you can see the chip evacuation. I am having a hard time showing you since the dust shoe is in the way. I even lifted it up to get some better shots, resulting in a mess! But it was worth it smile.gif


Very nice surface finish. Really sharp edges with no rubbing or vibration marks.


Cleaned up the cut a bit with some compressed air.


First tool cut done, now on to bigger (and better?) tools!


Up from 4 mm to a 10 mm end mill! I do not have any tight inner corners this time, and a larger diameter tool produces a better cut than a smaller diameter tool. So I will use this 10 mm for the contour cut!


Auto Zero after each tool change. Goes out to the reference position and adjusts the ZERO-plane after the new and changed tool height.


I use these droplet canons on each side to apply coolant/lubrication fluids. Works really well. You don't have that mist all over the shop and it also evacuates chips.


Now using a bigger ER25 collet! And, you guessed it, the 10 mm collet for the 10 mm tool smile.gif Rocket science!


The inner profile cut under way. This is the first roughing pass. I am taking about 2 mm per pass with a feed rate around 600 mm/min.


Tabs are starting to show! That means we are close to cutting through the stock.


Inner contour done. Now I just have to get that thing out of there...


These are the tabs I am talking about. They hold the part in place so it does not come loose during the cutting passes. The part coming loose will result in either the tool breaking, or damaging the part, or pushing it loose from its clamps. A pain in the ass, but better than the alternative.


I use a rotating tool that uses air as propellant. And I use these small and neat cutting disks. Much more robust than a Dremel disk, for example.


Cut done. But you can see that I am now left with these partially cut tabs sticking out. So that's no good at all.


This is solved with another pass. In programming I saved about 0.5mm for a finishing cut. Where I remove the last bit of material and at the same time improves the surface finish quality even more.


This will go in the bin with scrap parts that I might have use fore later. It's big enough that I don't want to just toss it.


Surface finish is really good. Now I just need to keep it this good until final sanding and glass bead blasting.


This is the second side of the part. Chamfers and some M4 holes were made here. You can see that my stock is defined as XYZ with the Z-axis starting on the top of the stock here instead of the bottom.


With the outer contour coming next, I need to secure the piece to the table since the outer clamps will do nothing when the piece is nearly free from the stock. If you don't have clamps securing the piece from "inside" like this, you must either use tabs or you'll get a V-shaped artifact when the piece comes loose, as the tool will push the part away the last millimeter or so. This may cause the part to bounce back into the tool and cause all kinds of issues. And because you lose the position of the part when it comes off the stock, that makes it very hard to do a final pass on it to clean up tabs. This is a real issue if you can't clamp it down. I will have some parts like that later, I fear.


I got a bit worried about marks so I put some plastic pieces to protect the surface of the piece.


This is what the code looks like. Some basic G-code for those interested, the S defines the tool speed, so in this case 13610 RPM. The M3 turns the spindle on in clockwise direction. M8 turns mist cooling on. Then G0 followed by XYZ with numbers tells the computer to go to that position in rapid speed (the maximum speed you have set it to). G1 works the same way but with the difference that it does not go to XYZ in rapid but in a specified feed rate (F). So for example, G1 Z11.5 F317 tells the motors to move the Z-axis to 11.5 mm above the 0-plane in with a speed of 317 mm/min.


The purple crosshair shows the machine's current position. You can also see some G-code, for example those dotted red lines are rapid moves in the XY-plane.


Sharp corners. Always nice to know that the machine is capable of that. You can sometimes get round corners, especially when the machine is trying to keep a constant velocity.


After a few minutes the cut is done. Here is the result. Now I have to release the clamps and turn the piece around and do the other side. There are some chamfered holes and a few more holes to be drilled.


Was deciding on the width for the chamfers so I did a few tests on an aluminium sheet that I was in the bin. Decided on 9 mm for the M4 screws and 7 mm for M3. A bit smaller than the ISO standard of 10 and 7.5 mm respectively. But I think it looks nicer with the smaller diameter so that is what I am going with.


10 mm Chamfer end mill. 90 degrees with a sharp tip. Used for plastics, aluminium, iron etc. Some kind of titanium coating, if I remember correctly.


Chamfers done!


Surface finish is very nice, except from that oxidized surface due to storage... I'll have to sand that down.


Really pleased with the first part! No mistakes as of yet!


One completed bottom piece!
post #30 of 387
WOW, insane build man! love the direction this is going!

That Festool saw is badass for sure, I want one lol

Jake
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