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Should AMD spin off the high-level SIMD to a separate chip?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
edit: I meant to say socket not slot


Consider the following:

1) CPUs used to do the work of GPUs. We can see from the evolution of the discreet GPU the advantages of having them separate

a) nimbleness – upgrade GPU without having to upgrade CPU/board
b) more chip space – more space to use for transistors from having separate chips
c) better tailoring – people who need GPU power can invest in that without being forced to pay for it on the chip (usually... Broadwell C is an exception, with half the CPU being graphics)
d) more power – separate CPU and GPU makes it easier to cool the same wattage with less noise, generally, thanks to much larger area to work with

2) Intel has to downclock AVX-2/AVX-512 already. That doesn't seem very optimal. By having the SIMD chip separately powered and cooled it could be cranked up.

3) Intel seems to be using AVX tech as a way to separate itself from Zen. There is already talk about Zen not being optimal for AVX-2 and not having AVX-512 at all. People say "well, it will be forever before AVX-512 is a thing" but that doesn't change the fact that people said the same thing about regular AVX. It will be a thing and it will take up transistor real estate, power consumption, cooling, etc.

By spinning off AVX-2 and higher to a SIMD chip AMD could let people counter Intel's instructional expansion moves. It could also propel AVX-512 into the mainstream, with AMD being able to lead the pack by cranking up the power instead of having to downclock.

I know CPUs have eaten the MMU and FPU but they have mostly coughed the GPU out. HBM2 may make the APU more viable but there is always going to be the problem of concentrating so much heat into a small area, yields, and the fact that a chip can only be so large. One can put more than one chip into a die, though.

4) Should the separate SIMD chip be cooled by the CPU cooler, with a hybrid socket that can fit both chips but also operate with just the main CPU installed? Or, should it go fully separate like a northbridge chip or even have a slot like a GPU?

5) Would the latency penalty be too great, even if the chips are close to each other on the board?

6) Would it make sense to dump all SIMD into the separate chip or leave AVX and below on for mainstream users? It seems most sensible to do the latter to not force people into buying a second chip. However, that also makes for more fragmentation. I can hear the whining now, though "With Intel I only need to buy one CPU. With AMD I have to buy TWO!!!" (even if both are cheaper together than that one chip is alone).
post #2 of 5

You can edit the thread title if you want. Just click "Edit Thread".

 

That's all I'm here for.

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It's a computer!
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
AudioAudio
X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post

You can edit the thread title if you want. Just click "Edit Thread".
Thanks.
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by superstition222 View Post


Thanks.

 

You're welcome!

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(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
AudioAudio
X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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It's a computer!
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
AudioAudio
X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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post #5 of 5
That's how x87 co-processor used to work until 486. Latency makes this idea utterly impractical with modern CPUs.
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