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Terminology Pet Peeves Thread (misnomers that annoy you) - Page 5

post #41 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitavreb View Post

Bananalike??? Well that's terrible.
Sounds a bit like daniel0731ex passive-aggressively let out some personal frustrations there: "Asymmetrical mice are not necessarily more ergonomic than symmetrical ones at all! Stupid bananas."

...On a more serious note:
Quote:
Originally Posted by qsxcv View Post

"polling stability" < usb polling is always stable to nanoseconds. the operating system adds jitter to the timing of the reported data
Very true, but what is the catchy alternative here?
post #42 of 69
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HAGGARD View Post

Sounds a bit like daniel0731ex passive-aggressively let out some personal frustrations there: "Asymmetrical mice are not necessarily more ergonomic than symmetrical ones at all! Stupid bananas."

( ͡º ͜ʖ ͡º)
post #43 of 69
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I'm non-banana symmetrical master race myself. ( ͡º ͜ʖ ͡º)
post #44 of 69
Thread Starter 
Relevant:

RazerBananaPhone.jpg
Edited by daniel0731ex - 8/28/16 at 12:34am
post #45 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by DerComissar View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

RMA. RMA is a noun, the initialization of Return Material Authorization, and is NOT a verb. I worked thirty years in warehousing with frequent extended stints in shipping and receiving. At no time during that thirty years did we ever refer to a return as an RMA. Whenever an item was returned to a vendor or manufacturer for whatever reason, it was called a "return". An RMA was the authorization to return the item, not the process of returning the item, and could be a document that was included inside the package or outside the package in a packing list envelope, a number that was marked on the outside of the package, or both (I always included all documentation inside the package, whether it was required or not, in case any external documentation got obliterated during shipping). The purpose of an RMA is to alert the receiver at the vendor or manufacture why the item was being returned, who returned the item, and what was supposed to be done with the returned item.

For some odd reason (actually, I know why; I just don't want to insult anyone), the computer component industry has been allowing the improper use of the term RMA.

And yes, I know this rant isn't going to change anything but you did ask.
I shall give Lady Fitzgerald a Rep+thumb.gif for this reply.
Very good post.

As for mine, I dislike seeing any posters using such terms as "quite" for quiet, and especially the use of "To" for Two, or Too.

This is a sickness that has been propagated by sources that I cannot mention on this forum.
Take that for what you will, or as the powers that be will say,"Doest as thou wilt".
Quote from the Church Of Satan.

Thank you.

It's amazing how many people on forums do not believe spelling matters (not to mention grammar, sentence structure, etc.) and will take anyone to task who point out errors like that. On my last job before retiring permanently (a convenience store; I wanted a low stress job—missed that call—to supplement my pension from early retirement until Social Security could kick in), I saw what happened to the majority of applications that came in; they went directly into the trash can. Why? Because of poor spelling, grammatical errors, etc. This was for entry level jobs that any idiot should have been able to handle. There were so many applications, the quickest way to cull out the idiots from the applicants worth interviewing was by weeding out the ones who couldn't spell on a simple application (we aren't even talking about a basic résumé here). What was really sad was most of the discarded applications were from high school graduates, college students, and even some college graduates.
It is amazing, yet somewhat sad, to see that, these days.

I'm 59 years old now, and we were taught far better than what the younger generation is now.
Certainly, my use of the English language isn't perfect either. But I really do try to speak to the best of my ability.

Perhaps the new technologies, such as cell phone use, and texting, have been responsible for a lot of this abuse of our language.

It's interesting to note that you mentioned highly qualified people, who should have known better than to fill out a job app, that way.
I suspect that some of the members of this forum know how to speak properly as well, but talk like idiots, just because it's a cool thing to do now.
To them, of course.rolleyes.gif
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post #46 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by daniel0731ex View Post

Relevant:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
RazerBananaPhone.jpg
Proposing another alternative for so-called "ergonomic mice": flaccid-penis-like.

Are we done ****posting or do you have more?
Quote:
Originally Posted by chr1spe View Post

I use the term PCS to mean anything that causes inaccuracy at high speed whether it is clipping, malfunctioning, or just acceleration/inaccuracy.
Agreeing with this btw. - perfect control speed still has meaning and terminological value in distinction to malfunction/clipping/"acceleration". And be it as an encompassing term. Easier to say "Works perfectly up to Xm/s" (i. e. "PCS is Xm/s") than "Clips at Xm/s, starts to experience speed-related accuracy variance at Ym/s and malfunctions at Zm/s". At least in casual use and as a stat to give with it that's useful.

And I guess "Laser Sensor vs. Optical Sensor " is a classic? In most designs (all but Twin-Eye?), both are optical systems - VCSEL Sensor vs. LED Sensor.
post #47 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

You totally missed the point. Attitudes like yours is one reason why languages, etc. degenerate.

It's more like languages develop in a way that might look like degeneration. From viewpoint of linguistics what's happening is normal process and happened many times already in world's history. There is a word in my language that made almost 180 degrees turn over like 200 years. In old literature it means "for sure", in modern language it means "maybe".

Thank you however for explanation about RMA.
post #48 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerComissar View Post

It is amazing, yet somewhat sad, to see that, these days.

I'm 59 years old now, and we were taught far better than what the younger generation is now.
Certainly, my use of the English language isn't perfect either. But I really do try to speak to the best of my ability.

Perhaps the new technologies, such as cell phone use, and texting, have been responsible for a lot of this abuse of our language.

It's interesting to note that you mentioned highly qualified people, who should have known better than to fill out a job app, that way.
I suspect that some of the members of this forum know how to speak properly as well, but talk like idiots, just because it's a cool thing to do now.
To them, of course.rolleyes.gif

I suspect it's more about how well you studied not how well you've been taught. 50 years ago life was much less convenient so people just had to put more effort even just to stay afloat. Level of motivation is incomparable to modern times. However in any age there are people who just have URGE to learn new stuff.
post #49 of 69
"Hybrid palm-fingertip grip" and the like. Maybe this is just my subjective view, but THAT SOUNDS LIKE CLAW GRIP. Mixing and matching the classic three grip archetypes doesn't really tell others **** since grip is such an individual thing, Your palm doesn't touch the mouse? Fingertip. Majority of palm and fingers rest on the mouse? Palm. Only back part of palm touches mouse and fingers are more or less arced? Claw.
post #50 of 69
When awareness of angle snapping and inconsistent acceleration hit the mainstream, normies started calling sensors devoid of these issues "flawless". Thus the buzzword "flawless sensor" developed. They didn't care 5 seconds earlier, but now you had to have a "flawless sensor". Normies didn't follow underground trends though, so they're unaware of the smoothing/input lag craze and still call outdated sensors "flawless", referring to their supposed "1:1" tracking.

In all seriousness, I have nothing against the term, but whenever somebody uses it, you can tell his experience/research boils down to a few borrowed words, probably from linus tech tips or an equivalent. They'll fear the "snapping" and "acceleration" boogieman, even though the industry has moved past these issues a long time ago. They don't really know what they want or why they want it - they essentially just follow commands on what a good mouse is supposed to be.
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