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Fans for my H110i GTX

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Question 1: Since I got H110i GTX quite a while back I've been running them with a pair of Noctua Industrials 2000RPM but they have started to get on me.

In a Caselabs case with too many holes, they are too damn loud, even at 1200-1300 rpm and if I go lower, my cpu gets too hot.

Any recommendation for a pair of good replacements? Price is not an issue. Preferably not cheap ones with weird clicking noise (thats even worse than loud fans).



Question 2:

I have been looking into getting the computer a bit quieter and step 1 is above. The second step is to exchange some of my HDDs in my computer for bigger ones so I can remove some of them (I have 6 mechanical HDDs in it) or even move them to a NAS.

Is there any simple tricks when working with making your computer quieter? It doesn't have to be dead silent but I think the Merlin SM8 has to many holes.
Edited by Votkrath - 9/26/16 at 9:24am
post #2 of 12
Question 1:
Short, but still a fairly noisy answer: GTs, EK Vardar F4ER or Fractal HP12 fans.

Long and quieter answer: The H110i uses a high fpi rad which means it must use high speed fans to perform. High speed fans + high fpi rad turbulence = high noise. The high speed, whiny pump just adds to the cacophony.

Consider cutting your loss now and migrate to a custom loop with a low fpi rad. Could put the GPU(s) in the loop as well. You have a big case with lots of space for bigger rads. Consider a 280 or 420 low fpi rad with 2-3 slower, quieter 140mm fans.

Or if not ready for a custom loop...replace the noisy 110i with a top tier air cooler. A D15, Thermalright Grand Macho will cool within a few degrees of the h110, but with 3-4 times LESS noise.

Or...keep the H110i, run replacement fans at a max of 1400-1600rpm and live with higher temps, but less noise.

Cooling is a tradeoff: Quiet, high performance, low cost - pick any two.

Attempting to achieve all three with the H110i will only end in frustration. Physics and Corsair's cost accountants are against you.

Question 2:

Definitely reduce the number of spinners. Depending on the model of the drive, a DIY suspension mount can reduce some of the worst sonic artifacts of mechanical drives. See this article on SPCR for some ideas.

The idea is to decouple the drive from the case, so it doesn't act as a resonator and amplify the already annoying bearing and servo noises. Or as you suggest, migrate them to a NAS that is placed far out of earshot. Replace OS/Program drives with SSDs. Not cheap, but silent.

Yes, the Merlin has many holes - it's designed for a big custom loop. While there are more 'silent' cases, like the Fractal R5, at best they can reduce noise by 3-6dB, but can't reduce the noise of a H110i by the 20-30dB required to achieve more humane noise levels.

Selecting quiet components is the best solution to create a quiet system.
post #3 of 12
Changing fans is not going to do nothing different than lowering the current fan speed.
With H110i being a poor rad, to compensate you have to run at a much higher speed at around 1500rpm.

To get better temps with lower noise, you have to go with a custom loop using low FPI rad, that way you can run fans 800-100rpm.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel 3770k @ 4.2Ghz Asus Z77 Sabertooth EVGA GTX1060 3GB Crucial Ballistix Tactical 16GB BLT2K8G3D1608ET... 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Crucial MX100 512GB Corsair Force 115GB WD Green 1TB WD Green 2TB 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Cryorig C1 + XT140 Win7 64 Home SP1 ASUS VE278Q CM Storm Trigger Brown Switch 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair AX650 NZXT S340 Logitech G500 Razer Goliathus Extended Mouse Pad - Speed 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Audiotrak Prodigy Cube DAC Edifier S330D 2.1 Speaker Bose AE2 Headphone Superlux 668B Headphone 
AudioAudioOtherOther
Logitech UE 4000 Headphone Sennheiser PC320 Headset MX-4 Thermal Paste (CPU/GPU) 3x 140mm Noctua NF-P14s Redux 1200rpm PWM 
OtherOther
1x 120mm Noctua NF-S12B Redux 1200rpm PWM NZXT 2m Sleeved White LED 
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel 3770k @ 4.2Ghz Asus Z77 Sabertooth EVGA GTX1060 3GB Crucial Ballistix Tactical 16GB BLT2K8G3D1608ET... 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Crucial MX100 512GB Corsair Force 115GB WD Green 1TB WD Green 2TB 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Cryorig C1 + XT140 Win7 64 Home SP1 ASUS VE278Q CM Storm Trigger Brown Switch 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair AX650 NZXT S340 Logitech G500 Razer Goliathus Extended Mouse Pad - Speed 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Audiotrak Prodigy Cube DAC Edifier S330D 2.1 Speaker Bose AE2 Headphone Superlux 668B Headphone 
AudioAudioOtherOther
Logitech UE 4000 Headphone Sennheiser PC320 Headset MX-4 Thermal Paste (CPU/GPU) 3x 140mm Noctua NF-P14s Redux 1200rpm PWM 
OtherOther
1x 120mm Noctua NF-S12B Redux 1200rpm PWM NZXT 2m Sleeved White LED 
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Reply
post #4 of 12
Pretty much what @MicroCat said, the H110i GT falls flat on its face when you try to reduce the fan speed, no matter how nice a fan you put on there its still going to be noisy and temps won't be any better.

Here are some graphs to demonstrate:
Max Fan speed:


40dB or less:


Fan swap to Noctua:


As you can see, the fan swap doesn't help much at all, compared to the H240-X which did see a drop in both temp and noise because its using a proper copper low fpi radiator. I'd cut your losses and sell of your H110iGT to someone that hopefully doesn't mind the noise as much. You can get a decent air cooler which will probably cost significantly less that the Corsair. Or you can get a decent AIO like the Swiftech H240-X2 or Any of the EKWB Predator units. Or build a fully custom loop.

Another victim of Corsair's marketing, spread the word so other people don't make the same mistake as you did. helpinghand.gif
Edited by Gilles3000 - 9/26/16 at 1:13pm
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the reponse.

My line of thinking is more in the lines of doing a lot of those little things. Change fans (minor improvements), sort out the HDD stuff (reasonable improvements) etc.

Would dampening material help any since I have a window and so many holes on the case? smile.gif
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilles3000 View Post


Another victim of Corsair's marketing, spread the word so other people don't make the same mistake as you did. helpinghand.gif

Nah man, I just got it for looks.

I didn't wanna go for the air cooler when I went with a white theme that covers parts of the white accents on the mobo and other stuff.

I'm generally more of an air guy to begin with but I prefered the looks of the loop but don't have the effort to do a custom one even if it looks better.
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Votkrath View Post

Thanks for the reponse.

My line of thinking is more in the lines of doing a lot of those little things. Change fans (minor improvements), sort out the HDD stuff (reasonable improvements) etc.

Would dampening material help any since I have a window and so many holes on the case? smile.gif

Sure, if you're willing to cover 30%+ area of the window with a nasty bitumen damping pad...but really won't make much of a difference, unless you go full extreme and build a double-walled enclosure around the case. ;-)

If you study the acoustic isolation literature, you'll get a headache and get depressed. The amount of sound that can leak from a small area is enough to make you cry. Or at least annoyed. And since the rad fans have to connect with the room air...well...you know that noise source too well.

Quiet starts at the source. Isolating noise takes more effort, lots of mass and fastidious attention to detail.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Votkrath View Post

Nah man, I just got it for looks.

I didn't wanna go for the air cooler when I went with a white theme that covers parts of the white accents on the mobo and other stuff.

I'm generally more of an air guy to begin with but I prefered the looks of the loop but don't have the effort to do a custom one even if it looks better.

You could have gone with Cryorig R1 with white accents or a Phanteks TC14PE in white.



Or you could go with the tiny, but great performing Scythe Fuma (with white EK fans) - wouldn't cover much MB accents.

If you want to stay with a CLC, the Arctic Cooling Liquid Freezer 360 is probably the quietest of the genre. It uses six of their F12s in push/pull.

You could purchase 4 low speed GTs or EK vardars and run them in push/pull on the 110 to reduce noise and contribute even more to the sunk cost fund. biggrin.gif
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by MicroCat View Post

Sure, if you're willing to cover 30%+ area of the window with a nasty bitumen damping pad...but really won't make much of a difference, unless you go full extreme and build a double-walled enclosure around the case. ;-)

If you study the acoustic isolation literature, you'll get a headache and get depressed. The amount of sound that can leak from a small area is enough to make you cry. Or at least annoyed. And since the rad fans have to connect with the room air...well...you know that noise source too well.

Quiet starts at the source. Isolating noise takes more effort, lots of mass and fastidious attention to detail.
You could have gone with Cryorig R1 with white accents or a Phanteks TC14PE in white.



Or you could go with the tiny, but great performing Scythe Fuma (with white EK fans) - wouldn't cover much MB accents.

If you want to stay with a CLC, the Arctic Cooling Liquid Freezer 360 is probably the quietest of the genre. It uses six of their F12s in push/pull.

You could purchase 4 low speed GTs or EK vardars and run them in push/pull on the 110 to reduce noise and contribute even more to the sunk cost fund. biggrin.gif
MicroCat, doesn't the h110 uses 140mm fans.

@Votkrath as already said h110 is no better than air, espeically when it's airflow is reduced to reasonable noise levels. These CLC radiators are inefficient and restrictive. They require hi-power hi-airflow fans to cool .. and hi-power hi-airflow fans are noisy. There is no way around it.

Combine this with a pump with a flow rate so slow you can fill a urine bottle faster than it can. They are only imaginably able to flow enough to keep CPU cool.

Thermalbench has tested several modular AIO sytems and kits. All flow way more than CLC pumps do.
Swiftech MPC30 pump in H320 X2 Prodigy + Rotameter flowing 0.9 GPM at full speed.
EK Predator 6w pump in Pedator + Rotameter flowing just under 6.0 GPM at full speed.
Alphacool pump in Eisbaer 240 + Rotameter AIO only flowing 0.3 GPM at full speed.


As far as I know the Asetek pumps with no resitrice flow about 0.11 GPM at full speed.
That is not through a flow meter because most flow meters are too restrictive. biggrin.gif

Edit: The Asetek pump was from H100i. Flowrate was through builtin CPU waterblock base. I don't think Thermalbench testing had CPU block in them.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1371863/corsair-h100i-max-flow-rate-test-video-result/0_20#post_19531311

Maybe @geggeg has been able to test a CLC pump on his Rotameter and can tell us how much they flow. tongue.gif
Edited by doyll - 9/28/16 at 4:32am
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post


EK Predator 6w pump in Pedator + Rotameter AIO only flowing 0.3 GPM at full speed.

Ehm, unless I'm reading it wrong the 6W DDC in the predator 240 is flowing 0.6 GPM at full speed, and its pretty quiet, so it has that going for it.

And just some extra info:
The new Predator 140 and 280 have EK's SPC pump, which I think would perform quite well in an AIO.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilles3000 View Post

Ehm, unless I'm reading it wrong the 6W DDC in the predator 240 is flowing 0.6 GPM at full speed, and its pretty quiet, so it has that going for it.

And just some extra info:
The new Predator 140 and 280 have EK's SPC pump, which I think would perform quite well in an AIO.
blushsmiley.gif should be about 0.6 GPM. Eisbaer 240 is 0.3 GPM.

The Swiftech and Predator both have respectable flow rates.

Even Eisbaer 240 flows way more than CLC pumps do.

All of those readings except CLC were through a flow meter, which is resistance all by itself. CLC was running into a measured gallon container and timed. I'm sure geggeg meter reading are reasonably accurate .. at least when compared to each other. But the CLC pump would likely be lower if running though fittings, hose, meter, etc.
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