Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Memory › OCing RAM, which timing to leasen first?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

OCing RAM, which timing to leasen first?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Ik its a noob question but in what order sould I leasen up the timings? I just need to push the FSB a little more (1-2MHz for OCD reasons tongue.gif) to reach my desired OC but memory is keeping me back a bit and I would not want to drop it to 1333MHz or to CL11 completely just for that, anybody can help me with the right order? Thanks in advice!

Memory specs: Kingston sticks 2x4GB 1333MHz @ CL9-9-9-24 OCed to 1600MHz @ CL10-10-10-26 Kingston sticks (ik they are poo but what can you do)?

Again, your help is greatly appreciated, cheers!
post #2 of 5
You kind of have to adjust them all at once. Sometimes you can get lucky and CAS will be rounded up and just lowering that may work.

A little background info:

Memory latency, or timings, like the number 10 in CL 10, are the length of time it takes the memory to complete a step in what it has to do before it moves on to the next step. That "time" is measured in "clock ticks", ie CL 10 takes 10 clock ticks to complete before the memory can move on to it's next operation. The length of one clock tick is the speed at which the memory is running. 1800 MHz memory has a clock tick length of one 1,800,000,000th of a second (1,800,000,000 clock ticks per second), so the CL step takes 10 x 1/1,800,000,000 seconds.

A stick of memory always takes the same amount of time to complete it's CL step (or any other step) no matter what speed it is running. If you run the above memory stick faster, say 2400 MHz, it still takes 10 x 1/1,800,000,000 seconds to complete the CL step, but each clock tick is now 1/2,400,000,000 of a second, so it now would take more clock ticks to complete the CL step. Namely, 24/18 times 10 (for CL step) or 13.3 clock ticks (10 times 24/18 clock ticks). But, alas, that has to be rounded to to CL 14 as memory can't use partial clock ticks..

Edited by billbartuska - 10/1/16 at 3:13am
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Thanks Bill for your answer, I solved my problem by puting some custom copper heatsinks I've made myself and just pushed a little more voltage (from 1.54V to 1.55V to be exact) through the sticks, so far all stress tests show them completely stable at that setting, maybe the cooling helped biggrin.gif



PS: I know that most likely you wouldn't need ramsinks to do that, but I am more comfortable knowing that the sticks get cooled properly now smile.gif
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

You kind of have to adjust them all at once. Sometimes you can get lucky and CAS will be rounded up and just lowering that may work.

A little background info:

Memory latency, or timings, like the number 10 in CL 10, are the length of time it takes the memory to complete a step in what it has to do before it moves on to the next step. That "time" is measured in "clock ticks", ie CL 10 takes 10 clock ticks to complete before the memory can move on to it's next operation. The length of one clock tick is the speed at which the memory is running. 1800 MHz memory has a clock tick length of one 1,800,000,000th of a second (1,800,000,000 clock ticks per second), so the CL step takes 10 x 1/1,800,000,000 seconds.

A stick of memory always takes the same amount of time to complete it's CL step (or any other step) no matter what speed it is running. If you run the above memory stick faster, say 2400 MHz, it still takes 10 x 1/1,800,000,000 seconds to complete the CL step, but each clock tick is now 1/2,400,000,000 of a second, so it now would take more clock ticks to complete the CL step. Namely, 24/18 times 10 (for CL step) or 13.3 clock ticks (10 times 24/18 clock ticks). But, alas, that has to be rounded to to CL 14 as memory can't use partial clock ticks..

So what exactly is the "benefit" of it taking more click ticks to complete a Cas latency (CL) step, if the CL step still takes 10 x (1/1,800,00,000) seconds if the memory is overclocked from 1800 to 2400 MHz?
The time it takes to complete the CL step is the same regardless...

Seems like lowering the CL time has a much bigger effect than increasing the memory speed...since 9 x (1/1,800,000,000) is faster than 10x(1/1,800,000.000 with clock ticks more often...)
SB Rig
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-2600k Gigabyte P67A-UD5 B3 R9 290X 16GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
WD 2 TB, WD 1 TB, 250gb Liteon ihbs212 blu-ray burner/reader XP+W7 Benq XL2720Z 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Ducky Shine 69/Year of the Goat/Shine 5 Seasonic Platinum X1000 Corsair 760T Logitech G502 with r0ach approved ™ sensor 
Mouse Pad
Puretrak Talent 
  hide details  
Reply
SB Rig
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-2600k Gigabyte P67A-UD5 B3 R9 290X 16GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
WD 2 TB, WD 1 TB, 250gb Liteon ihbs212 blu-ray burner/reader XP+W7 Benq XL2720Z 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Ducky Shine 69/Year of the Goat/Shine 5 Seasonic Platinum X1000 Corsair 760T Logitech G502 with r0ach approved ™ sensor 
Mouse Pad
Puretrak Talent 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Falkentyne View Post

So what exactly is the "benefit" of it taking more click ticks to complete a Cas latency (CL) step, if the CL step still takes 10 x (1/1,800,00,000) seconds if the memory is overclocked from 1800 to 2400 MHz?

The time it takes to complete the CL step is the same regardless...The time is the same but the CL setting (clock ticks) is more (higher).

Seems like lowering the CL time has a much bigger effect than increasing the memory speed...since 9 x (1/1,800,000,000) is faster than 10x(1/1,800,000.000 with clock ticks more often...)

You're not thinking this through: It takes the same time, but more clock ticks
1800 MHz, CL9 memory won't run at CL10 2400 MHz
2400 / 1800 x 9 = 11.99 (CL12 - more clock ticks).

Your example since 9 x (1/1,800,000,000) is faster than 10x(1/1,800,000.000 with clock ticks more often... is true, but CL10 is slower that CL9 at the same clock speed. 10 / 9 x 1800 = 1999 ( ~2000 Mhz)... performance is equal at 1800 MHz CL9 and 2000 MHz CL10.

Yes, at the same speed, lowering a timing has a performance boost, with CL, a big boost.

And don't forget, to get from 1800 MHz to 2400 MHz you'd have to change almost all the timings, not just CL
Edited by billbartuska - 10/1/16 at 3:05pm
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Memory
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Memory › OCing RAM, which timing to leasen first?