Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Water Cooling › New to watercooling. Parvum Case.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New to watercooling. Parvum Case.

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Hello,

As the title suggest, I'm new to watercooling, and I'm planning out a build for myself. It will be my first 'high-end machine' and the idea will be to overclock the graphics card as well as the processor. I am open other suggestions about my build as I'm more of a software maker than a pc maker. This build will be a learning tool for me as well as an award to myself for landing my 'dream job'..woot.

Some immediate questions:

1) Graphics Card: I know I want SLI 1080's, and I also know I wish to watercool. I suppose my question is, what is a good 1080 to make a custom loop? Does it matter as long as I'm able to overclock it?

2) I have officially fell in love with Parvum Cases, and I desire a Matx form factor. While the S2.5 looks nice to me, I wonder if the R1.0 would be better fitting for what I wish to build?

2.5) More importantly, related to question 2. I have the slightest clue how many fans and radiators, and fans without radiators to get for this build (depending if I get Parvum S2.5 or R1.0). I am completely lost. While not having the machine too loud -- I of course, wish to keep all my overly priced hardware from catching fire when overclocking.

To make it easier on the nice person who would give me suggestions/aid, here are the links related to my topic:

Parvum S2.5:
http://www.parvumsystems.com/product/s2-5-matx

Parvum R1.0:
http://www.parvumsystems.com/product/r1-0-matx
'Rough Draft' Build:
https://pcpartpicker.com/list/ztsVLD

Thank you to those in the know and willing to help in advance.
post #2 of 5
First go to EK water blocks web site to understand how loops works and what you need. They do an excellent job of describing how it all works, joins together and what you need.
Then go to the Parvum forum in computer cases section on this site. You will see lots of builds and what people are doing with S2/R1 etc.
This should start to give you ideas what to do and what case will work.
post #3 of 5
1. Not sure what you mean by a "good 1080." The cards are essentially all the same, with price differences generally accounting for slight factory overclocks or special cooling (better fans, factory water blocks, etc.). If you're planning to overclock, either save some money by going with a base clock card (you'll OC it yourself anyway, so the conservative factory OC won't help much) or, if you want to go crazy, look for the higher-end ones that have better power management/delivery. Those are meant to be more stable under high overclocks.

The more important bit for watercooling is to make sure you get a card for which you can get a block.

2. Check out the case forums/threads for some ideas of what others have done.

2.5. I'd use the calculator on the EK website to get a basic idea and go from there. Generally, the more rad space you get the better. If you're more concerned with noise I believe it's best to get less restrictive (i.e., thinner) rads so you can run lower RPM fans.
post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kriz225 View Post

1. Not sure what you mean by a "good 1080." The cards are essentially all the same, with price differences generally accounting for slight factory overclocks or special cooling (better fans, factory water blocks, etc.). If you're planning to overclock, either save some money by going with a base clock card (you'll OC it yourself anyway, so the conservative factory OC won't help much) or, if you want to go crazy, look for the higher-end ones that have better power management/delivery. Those are meant to be more stable under high overclocks.

The more important bit for watercooling is to make sure you get a card for which you can get a block.


This is what I meant, thank you a lot, answered my 'best 1080' question (however vague) in such a way I was looking for.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mods9165 View Post

First go to EK water blocks web site to understand how loops works and what you need. They do an excellent job of describing how it all works, joins together and what you need.
Then go to the Parvum forum in computer cases section on this site. You will see lots of builds and what people are doing with S2/R1 etc.
This should start to give you ideas what to do and what case will work.

I have toyed around with the EK site to get an idea of how much money I'll be pouring into the watercooling itself (I added a few extra for all the hard tubing I'm sure to mess up on).


I actually found this particular site surfing for "Parvum Building logs".

I am curious if 2 240 radiators would be enough to cool overclocked processor and 2 GPUs overclocked. I have a hunch that 2 240's are sufficient for not overclocking (from the research I've gathered), but overclocking? The S2.5 has room for..

Front: 240mm (65mm)
Top: 240mm (65mm)
(fan & radiator clearance).

I'm slightly concerned about the noise level/overclocking abilities with *only* (if that's the right word) 2 240's.

Any suggestions from those that have went before me in regards to such concerns?
1) Could I overclock the hell out of this with said radiators?
2) May be more difficult to answer, but what would the noise be when overclocking if such is possible with that set up?

Overclocking isn't a must, but it would be nice to have the option.

I'll attempt to tinker with those calculators, but some 'words of wisdom' from the experienced would ease the mind more.
Again, thanks!
Edited by TheCube - 1/12/17 at 5:13pm
post #5 of 5
Consider the pump and fans when it comes to cooling as much as the RADS. Here is my experience with my Parvum S2.0

I have a R9 290 and 4790K. I originally had 2 EK PE240 with Corsair SP120. I used a EK DDC PWM pump because IMO its fits better to this case size then the D5. The PE is an excellent RAD and I ran the pump via ASAS Fan Xpert at around 1500RPM. You need noise damper for the pump, because it vibrates the case, so I started with a pad. Cooling was brilliant on my ref R9 290, which is why it has lasted me so long @1080 60Hz. The PE's allowed me to run the fans at 600RPM as well. I soon read up that the DDC does not like heat and the Corsair SP120 are not the best when it comes to noise. I also liked the look of hard tube, so needed a change.

I replaced the PE with SE and put EK Varder on the front. I also took out my DDC pump and put a heat sink on it with pump top and separate RES. I could now run the DCC at 3200RPM and the Varder at 1000RPM for the same noise as the Corsair at 600RPM, and same cooling temps. If you use the S2.5, you need slim rads, because it a tight space to build in, especially with hard tube, which is not as forgiving as flex tube.
I have seen people put SLI is this case size, but if I was doing the same as you, I would look at the R1.0. You can fit two 360 in the bottom, which will easily handle any over-clocks you do. You also have space for a D5(less heat and bit quieter then DDC), which I would pick if I had more room to work in.
Google PARVUM APIS by JR23 to see just how good this can look. My next case will be an R1.0 or a Hex Gear R40, but I still cannot decide which to pick.
I hope this helped.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Water Cooling
Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Water Cooling › New to watercooling. Parvum Case.