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[Build Log] The Big Red "Devastator" CaseLabs THW10 - Custom Powder Coating - Page 21

post #201 of 234
Thread Starter 
I finished making the molex power cable that goes to the SSD hot swap bays. Here's the "Y" cables made and ready to install into the connector bodies.



With the connectors bodies on.




This cable goes right along side the power cable for the Aquaeros. Notice I made this cable so the heat shrink is behind the reservoir.



Got the two cables lined up better here.



I now have all the wiring done that I can do without hardware... and we'll be talking about hardware soon biggrin.gif



But before we talk about hardware, I have some tubing to work on thumb.gif
post #202 of 234
I have a question looking at your last picture : how will you prime the pumps ?

if I get this right your pumps are in the left in transparent tops, and you *beautiful* aqualis is on the right.
However the exit ports of the aqualis are slightly under the pump tops...have you tested that the water will get there ?
Jubi-PC
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Jubi-PC
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post #203 of 234
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jubijub View Post

I have a question looking at your last picture : how will you prime the pumps ?

if I get this right your pumps are in the left in transparent tops, and you *beautiful* aqualis is on the right.
However the exit ports of the aqualis are slightly under the pump tops...have you tested that the water will get there ?

As long as the water level in the reservoir is higher than the inlet to the pump, it should be no problem.

I plan to keep the water level to the top of the reservoirs.
post #204 of 234
Thread Starter 
Hardware on order! CPU and Motherboard Selection

First, to all the AMD fans out there, I actually really gave using an AMD CPU serious consideration. When I first started this build I would have never even considered using an AMD CPU. However, the Ryzen CPUs are actually very impressive at a great price point. Then the Treadripper came out and is clearly a great value with lots of cores. I really believe that Intel got caught with their pants down here.

I would not be surprised if Intel was not even planning to release any of the 12, 14, 16 or 18 core CPUs if not for Threadripper, and I doubt they would have released the Skylake X CPUs as early as they did either. The big comeback for AMD CPUs is really great for the enthusiast community!

After reading reviews on the Threadripper, I've decided to stick with Intel here simply because of how I will use this computer. The three most important things for me is gaming, overclocking, and benchmarking. Everything else will fall below those three.

I know that 18 cores certainly sounds impressive and automatically gives you bragging rights, but I would much rather have a higher overclock than more cores. I would have most likely chosen the 7820x eight core CPU, but with only 28 lanes to the CPU it would have limited my options for other hardware.

So I decided to go with the i9-7900x CPU. Ten cores with twenty threads is plenty for me. I've ordered a delidded 4.7 GHz 7900x from Silicon Lottery, that should be here soon.


As for the motherboard, this was a much easier decision to make. I always use Asus motherboards, I like their bios and have had great luck with them so far. I like the Apex board it looks really nice, but I think this build deserves to have the flag ship motherboard, so the Asus Rampage VI Extreme is the motherboard of choice here.

Although this motherboard has been around for a few months for the few lucky people who were able to get one. They have been pretty much out of stock everywhere, and when they do come in, they are all snatched up quickly. I actually prefer not to get one out of the first batch anyway. Also I like to wait for a few bios updates too. I'd rather wait until they get most of the kinks out.

I've been on the B&H photo/video email alert list for awhile. I never received an email, but I just checked a few days ago expecting to see the "Pre-Order" button and they were actually on stock, so I purchased it on the spot.
post #205 of 234
If I had bought my hardware now I would have most likely chosen the same components.
More cores is nice to a certain point, many tasks still favor core speed over number of cores
Jubi-PC
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Jubi-PC
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post #206 of 234
Thread Starter 
Working on the Tubing

I do have three small pieces of tubing previously installed. One on top of the case connecting the two top radiators, one down in front connecting the two front radiators, and the one to the flow meter so I could make the wiring to it.

I've had most of the loop planned out in my head for months now. The only section I wasn't quite sure about is the final return line, so I'm going to work on that section first. I'll detail the loop flow later.

I'm not going to be doing any bends (although I reserve the right to change my mind biggrin.gif), just straight Bitspower 16mm Acrylic tubing and Bitspower EML16 fittings with various 90s, and tees. Rather than using a hack saw I bought a little power cut-off saw to cut the tubing with. If you search "TruePower 919 High Speed Mini Miter/Cut-Off Saw", you will find one. I can't remember who, but someone here on OCN recommended this saw.



This roll of double back tape is the perfect height to support the end of the tubing to keep it level. I use masking tape to easily mark where I want to make the cut. The saw does not quite cut all the way through the 16mm tubing, just cut down as far as you can and then loosen the little vise and turn the tube with the saw still running.



Here's the cut end. The nice thing is if you need to cut the tube shorter, with this saw you can cut just a saw blade thickness off of the end if you need to. This saw really works great!



I also bought this Henco deburrer tool. It's supposed to clean up the end and make it smooth. I could not find this tool anywhere in the States, so I had to order this from someplace in Europe and the shipping was more than the tool cost!



I like good tools and don't mind paying up for them, but this tool was a complete disappointment! The very first time I tried it I knew I wasted my money and would not use it again mad.gif




Recently PrimoChill came out with this tool PrimoChill RFB Rigid Tubing Finishing Bit





Side by side comparison of both tools.



This PrimoChill tool is awesome! It quickly and easily makes a nice smooth finish with no sanding required at all. At first I used it in a drill, but found that at times it would slightly score the inside of the tubing where the bearing is. It works fine with the drill, however I found that it works quite well just turning the tool by hand. I even use the tool by hand to shave a couple of millimeters off the end of the tubing to adjust the length shorter.

The one on the left is from the first tool, it really leaves a rough ugly finish that would certainly need sanding. The one on the right is from using the PrimoChill tool, leaving a nice smooth finish with zero sanding.



In this picture on the far left tube I used the reamer tool that comes in the Monsoon bending kits. Before I got the PrimoChill tool, I was using that reamer, and then sanding it smoother. This one has not been sanded yet.
I highly recommend the PrimoChill tool! It's faster, easier to use, and leaves the best finish on the end thumb.gif




Remember that even though I have two reservoirs, two pumps, and six radiators, it is going to be one large loop. In this picture, the two short tubes into the reservoir with tee fittings will tie the two reservoirs together. The one on the right goes to the pass through and will connect to the reservoir on the other side, and will be the feed line to the pumps. The one on the left will go through the case opening to the other reservoir, and will connect to the flow meter for the return line. That one on the left is sagging down at the rotary fitting from the weight, don't worry it will be level before I'm done.




Here is the return line finished. With these flow meters you should not use a 90 degree fitting connected directly to the flow meter as this can cause erratic readings. Also there should be a length of straight tube both in and out of the flow meter for best results.



At the top of the vertical tube I used two 90 degree fittings to off-set the vertical tube to the rear. Otherwise if would have run directly into where the feed line is going to go. Also this allowed me to use a 90 degree fitting directly into the tee fitting at the bottom.



Now from the return side tee on the left, the next tube goes through the opening in the middle of the case connecting to the reservoir on the other side.



Here it is from the other side of the case.



Feed line from the reservoirs to the pump inlet installed.



Now you can notice that the pass through fitting for the feed line was placed there to be both level with the reservoir inlet as well as spaced the same distance from the reservoir as the return line on the other side thumb.gif



When I was younger I used to work with my Dad who was a carpenter/contractor, and he would always make sure everything was level, plumb, and square. Ever since then when things aren't level or are out of square it drives me nuts! In fact when I look at other builds, that is the first thing that I notice is if something isn't level, or straight up and down.

I put all of this section together without the collars for the EML16 fittings while I fitted everything. I spent quite a bit of time shortening and adjusting the tubing lengths in order to make them all level, vertical, and perpendicular. Then put the collars on and tightened them all up.



For this side I still need to do the line out of the pumps and into the rear inside lower radiator port, and one long tube from the outer lower radiator port to the front radiator on this side.
post #207 of 234
I like the cart! Looks like it could be VERY useful for builds and doing maintenance on your PC. I may need to buy one!

Good luck with the build thumb.gif
TR-1950X
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Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Samsung 960 EVO 250 GB V-NAND PCIe Gen 3 x4 NVM... HGST Ultrastar 4TB LG BluRay Burner (24) Alphacool HT 13mm HardTube compression fit... 
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Monsoon PETG Hardline Tube 3/8 x 1/2 - custom b... Windows 10 Pro 64-bit Acer Predator X34 Ultra wide Razer Blackwidow Ultimate Stealth 
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Corsair AX1200 Case Labs M8  Razer Mamba Razer Goliathus Extended 
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OtherOtherOtherOther
EK Coolstream RAD XT 360mm Radiator Koolance 30 FPI 360mm Radiator Phobya G2 Changer 360mm Radiator EK Multioption 150 Reservoir 
OtherOtherOtherOther
EK Multioption 150 Reservoir SteelSeries Siberia 800 Wireless headphones Logitech HD Webcam C510 Thermaltake RC3400101A MAX-3543 Mobile Rack 
OtherOtherOtherOther
XSPC Raystorm Neo sTR4 EK-FC Radeon Vega - Nickel Aquacomputer Aquaero 5 XT Aquacomputer G1/4 Flow Meter Sensor Block 
Other
Koolance CTR-SPD12X2 Dual 12V Pump Controller 
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TR-1950X
(33 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X Asus ROG Zenith Extreme Radeon RX VEGA 64 G.Skill TridentZ Series 32GB (4x8GB)  
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Samsung 960 EVO 250 GB V-NAND PCIe Gen 3 x4 NVM... HGST Ultrastar 4TB LG BluRay Burner (24) Alphacool HT 13mm HardTube compression fit... 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Monsoon PETG Hardline Tube 3/8 x 1/2 - custom b... Windows 10 Pro 64-bit Acer Predator X34 Ultra wide Razer Blackwidow Ultimate Stealth 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair AX1200 Case Labs M8  Razer Mamba Razer Goliathus Extended 
AudioOtherOtherOther
Creative Labs Sound Blaster Recon3D Fatality Pr... Corsair SP-2500 2.1 Gaming speakers Koolance PMP-400 Pump with Heatsink kit and Pum... Koolance PMP-400 Pump with Heatsink kit and Pum... 
OtherOtherOtherOther
EK Coolstream RAD XT 360mm Radiator Koolance 30 FPI 360mm Radiator Phobya G2 Changer 360mm Radiator EK Multioption 150 Reservoir 
OtherOtherOtherOther
EK Multioption 150 Reservoir SteelSeries Siberia 800 Wireless headphones Logitech HD Webcam C510 Thermaltake RC3400101A MAX-3543 Mobile Rack 
OtherOtherOtherOther
XSPC Raystorm Neo sTR4 EK-FC Radeon Vega - Nickel Aquacomputer Aquaero 5 XT Aquacomputer G1/4 Flow Meter Sensor Block 
Other
Koolance CTR-SPD12X2 Dual 12V Pump Controller 
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post #208 of 234
post #209 of 234
This picture is sexy.....



Plus...I've ordered one of those PrimoChill Finishing bits. Thanks for the tip!
post #210 of 234
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohms View Post

I like the cart! Looks like it could be VERY useful for builds and doing maintenance on your PC. I may need to buy one!

Good luck with the build thumb.gif
Yes the cart was one of my best purchases ever! I can roll it out to my back patio for pictures, roll it closer to my work bench if I want to, roll it out of the way if needed, and I've literally turned it around hundreds of times already while working on it. Plus the case is already so heavy I can hardly lift it.


Thanks for posting the links ruffhi thumb.gif


Quote:
Originally Posted by cpachris View Post

This picture is sexy.....



Plus...I've ordered one of those PrimoChill Finishing bits. Thanks for the tip!
Thanks Chris I like that shot too. You will love that PrimoChill finishing bit!




I have the motherboard in hand now. I won't have time for a few days, but next I'll be sharing the "unboxing" with you!
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