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[Build Log] The Big Red "Devastator" CaseLabs THW10 - Custom Powder Coating - Page 10

post #91 of 140
Impressive work. And those RPMs are really low. If you run power for the fans from somewhere else (ie PSU), you can probably get 8 or more fans per channel.
post #92 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruffhi View Post

Impressive work. And those RPMs are really low. If you run power for the fans from somewhere else (ie PSU), you can probably get 8 or more fans per channel.



This, Exactly . . . . .


Power the Hubby via the PSU, and set the control mode to PWM, and you'll have no issues running 1 full rad's worth, (8) per channel, and there'll be virtually no load on the A6.
post #93 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruffhi View Post

Impressive work. And those RPMs are really low. If you run power for the fans from somewhere else (ie PSU), you can probably get 8 or more fans per channel.
This is exactly what I'll be doing on mine. 33 fans total, controlled by the motherboard, but using several 8-way PWM splitters with the power coming directly from the PSU. Well, that's the plan anyway.
post #94 of 140
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruffhi View Post

Impressive work. And those RPMs are really low. If you run power for the fans from somewhere else (ie PSU), you can probably get 8 or more fans per channel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IT Diva View Post

This, Exactly . . . . .


Power the Hubby via the PSU, and set the control mode to PWM, and you'll have no issues running 1 full rad's worth, (8) per channel, and there'll be virtually no load on the A6.

Quote:
Originally Posted by meson1 View Post

This is exactly what I'll be doing on mine. 33 fans total, controlled by the motherboard, but using several 8-way PWM splitters with the power coming directly from the
PSU. Well, that's the plan anyway.

Thanks for your input everyone, much appreciated! I have actually considered doing just that, powering the splittys/fans directly from the power supply, and just using the Aquaeros for control.

I am going to shorten the current pigtails on each fan, and change the sleeving. My plan is to make a custom fan wire harness for each channel, and not use any splittys. I would like to keep the fan wiring as clean as possible. With custom fan harnesses I'd just have one cable for each channel plugged into the Aquaero, and less wiring clutter. I have eight channels available, so I have enough channels to pull it off.

Here's how:
Channel 1 - Left top and front push fans - 6 fans
Channel 2 - Right top and front push fans - 6 fans
Channel 3 - Left top and front pull fans - 5 fans
Channel 4 - Right top and front pull fans - 5 fans
Channel 5 - Left bottom fans - 4 fans
Channel 6 - Right bottom fans - 4 fans
Channel 7- HDD cage fan and rear fan - 2 fans
Channel 8 - reserved for a something I haven't shown yet

The EK 140ERs are 2.3 watts each, and the EK 120ERs are 2.16 watts each. So that would have 50.6 watts on the Aquaero XT and 22.7 watts on the Aquaero LT. The Aquaeros are rated for 30 watts per channel, so they should be able to handle that. I could also rearrange the channels to even out the power distribution more evenly between the two Aquaeros.

I do have four splittys if I decide to power the fans from the power supply. The only really good place I have to put the spittys is under the top cover, or mounted to the back/center divider next to the Aquaeros where there is not going to be a lot of room. If I go this route I'll make custom length fan extension cables to go from the fans to the splittys.

Here's how I could set up the channels then:
Channel 1 - Top push fans - 8 fans
Channel 2 - Top pull fans - 6 fans
Channel 3 - Front push and pull fans - 8 fans
Channel 4 - Bottom fans - 8 fans
Channel 5 - HDD cage fan
Channel 6 - Rear fan
Channel 7 - reserved
Channel 8 - extra

Once I get the all the fans and radiators mounted up again I'll figure out which way to go.
post #95 of 140
that coat of red is amazing.
Lanu Moana
(18 items)
 
Niecey
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 6700K Gigabyte Z170X Designare EVGA GTX 980 Ti Superclocked +  Corsair Vengeance LED Blue 32GB (4x8) 3200MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingCooling
Samsung 950 Pro 512GB M.2 Seagate 4TB SSHD XSPC Raystorm Pro EK XTX 360mm Radiator 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Corsair ML Blue LED 120mm Fans x7 Windows 10 Pro Acer Predator XB271HU  Corsair Strafe RGB Cherry MX Silent 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX1200i CaseLabs Mercury S8 Corsair M65 Pro Corsair MM880 RGB Polaris 
AudioAudio
ATH-M50x Klipsch Promedia 2.1 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 6600K Gigabyte Z170X Gaming 6  EVGA GTX 980 Ti ACX SC+ Corsair Vengeance LED White 16GB (2x8GB) 3200MH... 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo 500GB Western Digital 2 TB Caviar Black Enermax Liqmax II 120S Windows 10 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
First FSM-270YG 2560x1440p IPS Panel Logitech Orion 610 Cherry Mx Red Corsair AX860 Cooler Master Masterbox 5 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Cooler Master Xornet II GGing Stitching Black HyperX Cloud 
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Lanu Moana
(18 items)
 
Niecey
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 6700K Gigabyte Z170X Designare EVGA GTX 980 Ti Superclocked +  Corsair Vengeance LED Blue 32GB (4x8) 3200MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingCooling
Samsung 950 Pro 512GB M.2 Seagate 4TB SSHD XSPC Raystorm Pro EK XTX 360mm Radiator 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Corsair ML Blue LED 120mm Fans x7 Windows 10 Pro Acer Predator XB271HU  Corsair Strafe RGB Cherry MX Silent 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair HX1200i CaseLabs Mercury S8 Corsair M65 Pro Corsair MM880 RGB Polaris 
AudioAudio
ATH-M50x Klipsch Promedia 2.1 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 6600K Gigabyte Z170X Gaming 6  EVGA GTX 980 Ti ACX SC+ Corsair Vengeance LED White 16GB (2x8GB) 3200MH... 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo 500GB Western Digital 2 TB Caviar Black Enermax Liqmax II 120S Windows 10 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
First FSM-270YG 2560x1440p IPS Panel Logitech Orion 610 Cherry Mx Red Corsair AX860 Cooler Master Masterbox 5 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Cooler Master Xornet II GGing Stitching Black HyperX Cloud 
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post #96 of 140
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Killa Cam View Post

that coat of red is amazing.
Thank you! It's really amazing in person!



Red Spray Paint Testing

I actually did most of this testing several years ago when I was trying to find the best match for the red MDPC-X sleeving. At my work we got new computers and had all the old ones stacked up, so I robbed a bunch of the rear fans out of them. I figured if I'm testing paint to paint fans with, I might as well test on actual fans. They are 80mm fans, I literally just took my thumbs and pushed the fan blades off the motor without disassembling them, that's why you'll notice a hole in the middle of some of the fans where the shaft broke off.

I bought every variation of red spray paint I could find at my local hardware store, and Amazon.

Most of these pictures were taken with a POS camera. Here we go, this one isn't even red, orange really.



Here is Cardinal Red, too dark as I suspected it would be.



Cherry Red is too dark too.



The next two were ok, but they were not specifically for plastic.





This one was actually the best color match by just a shade, however this one is harder to find, only found it online. The left fan I sprayed a clear coat over the color. Looks better without the clear coat.



These next two I actually did just a few months ago. Thought I'd try the PlastiKote brand. I had a couple of extra Gentle Typhoon fans laying around so I used those.
This one is their regular Red.






This one is the PlastiKote in Ford Red. I could hardly tell the difference between the two PlastiKote red paints. They were very close in color. Neither of these made the cut either.



The last three are all "for plastic" according to the labels. Here is the Krylon version.




Here is Rust-Oleum red made for plastic.



Save the best for last right! Here's the winner, the Rust-Oleum Painter's Touch Gloss Apple Red. I think the 2x coverage claim on the label is bogus, but this is awesome paint! It requires no primer, covers very well, and it dries nice and glossy with no need for a clear coat. The only draw back to this paint is that it takes six to seven days for the paint to fully dry on plastic.



The fan painting is now in process. Shortly I will show you exactly step by step how I did it. thumb.gif
post #97 of 140
Thread Starter 
EK Vardar Fan Painting Guide Part 1

I know there's various fan painting guides out there, you've probably seen some. I have a few tricks to share with you that could speed up the process and/or net you a better end result, but before I get started ...

WARNING: Obviously taking your fans apart voids the warranty. I'm going to show you how I did it. If you choose to attempt this yourself, you do so at your own risk! I am not responsible for your products.

With that said, let get to it. I have a lot of pictures to show you, so I am going to break this down into two parts.

First there is one tool that I consider a "must have" to do this job. It is miniature external snap ring pliers, to remove the retaining ring holding the fan blade on. The one you see on the left I bought on Amazon and was able to use on some Gently Typhoon fans. The one on the right has even smaller tips, and is the one I would recommend if you plan on doing this. I was only able to find these at one place online here saeproducts.com. Scroll down to the heading of "Miniature External Fix-Tip Pliers" I purchased model # MEP-390, the smallest tip size available.

It was quite the fiasco actually obtaining these! There is no way to order online, so I called and ordered over the phone. Long story short, multiple phone calls and over ten emails to the "Sales Manager", and over a month later I finally received these! The guy felt so bad, that they finally did send them to me for free, with two day shipping.



Once I had the pliers, I also took a file to the inside edges which allowed the pliers to close a little bit more so they could fit inside the little tiny snap ring.



You see how one side the tip is a little longer, I filed those even too so they could sit down flat. That made getting the snap ring off easier.



Here is the rest of the tools I used, xacto knife, tweezer (not a super sharp tip), small screw driver, small pick tool, as well as the snap ring pliers. If you look closely you can see a snap ring on the pliers.



Oh yes you need a heat gun too. About 10 to 12 seconds and the fan sticker will be ready to come off.



Keep the heat gun moving and use the tweezers to peel the sticker off. It's easy to get it started near where the wires solder on.



Now if you want to save and reuse the stickers, place them on some wax paper as you take them off, and immediately put something heavy on top like a book. The labels will want to curl up otherwise. If you get the heat gun too close to the stickers the top coating bubbles up and they would not be reusable. This happened to me on a few of them, but I'm putting new stickers on. After over night the sticker should stay fairly flat. I have them stored in a file folder.



Peeling the sticker off reveals the hardest part of this mod, getting that little tiny snap ring off without it flinging off somewhere, never to be found again!



Once I had the tool inside the snap ring, I would put my left index finger over the hole to reduce the chance of losing the snap ring.



Once you get the snap ring off there is a plastic washer underneath it. Most of the time it is stuck in the groove the snap ring is in, like this one. That holds the spring loaded bearing in place. So be careful, if the washer isn't in that groove the spring pressure will push the bearing and washer up. Just take the small screw driver and move the washer out of the groove and then it will come apart easily.



Next comes out a bearing and the spring.



Then you can lift the fan frame off, and there is the second bearing with a plastic washer below it.



I used a magnetic dish to put all the bearings, washers, and snap rings into.



Here's all the fan blades ready for prep. I only lost one snap ring during disassembly! I consider that excellent. Don't worry if you lose a snap ring, in Part 2 I'll show you a way to make it work just fine so you don't have to buy a replacement fan just for the clip.



We can't have paint getting through these holes, and getting onto the blade shaft or the rest of the inside.



Break out the Frog Tape.



Next I'm going to use a 1 3/4" circle hole punch.



This is made by EK Tools, no affiliation with EK Water Blocks. Turn it upside down so you can see better.



Center the tape in the hole punch.



Before you punch down, take the pick tool and poke a hole in the center. This makes the next step easier.



Here's the punched out circle.



Now using a single hole punch like you see in the background, and punch out the center. The little hole from the pick tool just helps line up the hole punch in the center easier.



The hole in the tape will now fit over the raised center part of the fan blade.



Place the tape circle cut-out down inside.



You can use a small screw driver to push the tape down around the raised area first. I used a small deep socket to push the tape down.



If the tape doesn't sit fairly flat in the center then it may not cover all the holes in the blade.



Now you can smooth the tape circle down around the outer edges.



Just make sure all the holes are well covered.



Here's all the blades with the first piece of tape in place. This part of the process actually went faster than anticipated. I did all of these in about an hour and a half.



For the next step. Place two pieces of tape over then entire fan blade opening.



Using the xacto knife trim the excess tape off.



The prep work is done. Here's all the blades ready to go.



I turned my little work shop into a makeshift paint booth. I put plastic up on the walls to not only protect everything from all the over spray, but also to keep to a minimum the dust and floating debris from getting into the paint.



If you know you're going to be painting some fans, then you can save up your TP rolls biggrin.gif If you just set your fans on something flat the paint ends up sticking on something some place. The TP rolls gets the fans up off the surface so you don't have that problem.



I'm using Rust Oleum Gloss Apple Red. This paint is excellent to spray on plastic, does not require any primer, or clear coating.



Apply three light coats. The first coat doesn't even completely cover everything, I can still see some black in places. Remember this is a lot of work, if you spray it on too heavy, the paint will run and it's really a lot of work to fix that.
Also be sure to wear an appropriate mask. You don't want to breath any paint fumes.



Part 2 coming soon thumb.gif
post #98 of 140
Thread Starter 
EK Vardar Fan Painting Guide Part 2

Previously when I've used this paint, after three days I figured it would be plenty dry enough to handle. As soon as I picked up the fan blades I could tell the paint was still soft, and actually left finger prints in the paint. If you read the can it says it takes six to seven days to fully dry on plastic.

So I let the paint dry on these fans for six days before even touching them.



Peel the tape off of the fan blade opening.



All the fan blades ready for the next step.



I tossed the first batch of TP rolls, using a new batch now. The rolls fit perfectly inside the fan. I've used this method on Gentle Typhoon fans too, they are smaller diameter, so just make two cuts on the end of the roll and then make a cone shape to fit inside the fan.



Back on the table and ready to paint the second side.



Again three light coats of paint.



Here you can see all the over spray on the drop cloth and plastic. Wear a mask!



I let them dry for a week this time! Take a small screw driver to poke the tape down through the holes.



Now it's easy to grab with the tweezers to pull the tape out.



Drop a plastic washer down the blade shaft.



Now the first bearing.



I am not painting the fan frames because the black works with my theme. If you want to paint the frames you'll have to mask off the fan motor and harness. The Gentle Typhoon fans are easy because you can just turn the motor counter clockwise about an eighth of a turn and the motor and harness comes right off the fan frame.

So if you want to paint the frames you'll obviously have to paint them before this step.
Drop the fan frame on top.



Drop the spring in.



Add the second bearing.



Put the second washer on.



Load the snap ring onto the pliers and set the pliers right next to the fan.



Using the tweezers, push down on the plastic washer to push the washer and bearing down.



Now take the pick tool and hold the bearing down by the outer edge of the bearing.


Set the tweezers down, pick up the pliers and slide the snap ring over the blade shaft. Make sure it catches in the groove.



Take the tweezers and squeeze the snap ring together.



Did you lose any snap rings? If so here's how to avoid buying another fan just for the clip. Go down to your local hardware store and buy some 5/32" E-clips like these. Here you can see the E-clip next to the stock snap ring.



The E-clip fits in the groove of the fan shaft perfectly.



The E-clip will not slide on sideways like it's supposed to. I used the tweezers to push the E-clip down over the blade shaft, and then it snaps in place.



At this point I power up the fans and make sure they work fine. All of mine were good to go thumb.gif
Next I use a 2" circle cutter to cut out some vinyl circles. The factory stickers are closer to 1 7/8" but they don't make a circle cutter in that size.





You can make custom stickers if you'd like, this is just a nice clean look.



Here's the finished product. Except for I'm going to change the sleeving.



Here's the 120mm fan.



Here is a 120mm fan next to the 140mm fan.



The other side, both fans have the same size hub.



A group shot with all the fans put back together.



Between, disassembly, prep work, painting, wait/dry time, and reassembly this was nearly a three week process.

I hope you enjoyed this guide. I enjoyed making it!
post #99 of 140
That looks like it was a bunch of fun. Great when an idea comes together. Nicely executed.
post #100 of 140
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruffhi View Post

That looks like it was a bunch of fun. Great when an idea comes together. Nicely executed.
Yes it was fun biggrin.gif
Thanks ruffhi!




Time to swap out the "paint plugs", the stop plugs that came with the radiators. I'm replacing them with low profile Bitspower stop plugs, using this large flat tip socket. This will help prevent gouging up the slots by using a smaller tip.



I bought 30 something of these stop fittings, they all just came in one plastic bag. When I dumped them out is when I realized they had two different style brandings on them. I'll use the ones on the left where you can't see the logo.




I like to air pressure test each radiator as I go. Some of these plugs are not accessible after the radiators are installed.



Bottom radiators and fans installed.



One of the front radiators.



These grills screw on from this sides, so once the front radiators are installed, there's no removing these grills without pulling the "rad-packs" out!



Here's a close up trying to show the metal flake in the powder coating. Very hard to photograph!



Now I'll spin the case around with all the radiators and fans re-installed. The fan wiring is just hanging all over the place, that'll be one of the next things to tackle.








Here's the hard disk drive mount with a 120mm fan mounted.



Couple of shots with the outer panels on.




Coming up next is fan wiring and reservoir mounting.
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