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VRM on the new AM4 motherboards - Page 140

post #1391 of 1989
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artikbot View Post

The... what?


What on Earth are you talking about?


Look - it's very simple.

More transistors=more gates.
More gates=more capacitors to charge.
More capacitors to charge=more electrons need to be taken from one place and put into another place.
More electrons that need to be taken from one place and put into another place=more losses.

This is heavily outweighed by the reduced conduction losses at high loads. Even at low loads, modern modulators can actually turn off phases completely, both on demand and automatically. Search for "APS", "EPU" and the likes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chew* View Post

cheers

I can go quote more where you claim its impossible to insulate properly to......suggesting hairs and other issues.

Sidenote Woot doing 4.3 now got vrm up to 35c @ 4.3, ill let prime cook for a while. Ambients are 76F currently.

I still stand by that statement.
post #1392 of 1989
That's fine. I'm not standing but I will sit next to my motherboard with a puddle of water on it running prime 95 rolleyes.gif

Now that's what I call water cooling.
post #1393 of 1989
Quote:
Originally Posted by virpz View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by cssorkinman View Post

The 51C is socket temp. smile.gif


My heatsinks are actually cooler than my body temp and feels cool to the touch.

Take the side off of your case and put a house fan on it if you want to compare.

Software is as accurate for my rig as it was for yours.

Pretty sure your vrm is running bellow ambient temps too...

Now you are just being silly.
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post #1394 of 1989
Quote:
Originally Posted by PsyM4n View Post


This is heavily outweighed by the reduced conduction losses at high loads. Even at low loads, modern modulators can actually turn off phases completely, both on demand and automatically. Search for "APS", "EPU" and the likes.
I still stand by that statement.

 

You're free to believe whatever you want to believe - but it doesn't change the fact that they are fixed losses and definitely not negligible. The technologies you cite are meant for deep sleep/parking states where keeping the phases turned on would mean the switching losses are potentially higher than the resistive losses. They hardly ever apply for a computer that is under any sort of load (that includes normal usage).

 

And do yourself a favour - before asking me to google something, educate yourself on basic power electronics and switching mode power supplies, then come back.

 

Thanks.

   
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post #1395 of 1989
Oh, let it be, let it be, let it be, let it be
And there will be an answer, let it be
kookoo.gif
post #1396 of 1989
Quote:
Originally Posted by cssorkinman View Post

Now you are just being silly.
That's good, it seems like it is always better to have just one more person to fill that picture.thumb.gif
post #1397 of 1989
Quote:
Originally Posted by virpz View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by cssorkinman View Post

Now you are just being silly.
That's good, it seems like it is always better to have just one more person to fill that picture.thumb.gif

I can see now that you have little interest in any truth that challenges your beliefs. Your presence has little value here.
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post #1398 of 1989
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artikbot View Post

You're free to believe whatever you want to believe - but it doesn't change the fact that they are fixed losses and definitely not negligible. The technologies you cite are meant for deep sleep/parking states where keeping the phases turned on would mean the switching losses are potentially higher than the resistive losses. They hardly ever apply for a computer that is under any sort of load (that includes normal usage).

And do yourself a favour - before asking me to google something, educate yourself on basic power electronics and switching mode power supplies, then come back.

Thanks.

http://www.overclock.net/a/database-of-motherboard-vrm-failure-incidents

Look for "Single phase" failures. Those are due to incorrect manual phase setting.

When not in need of more power, the best approach is to set the phases on the most efficient configuration, usually that's by leaving the said technology on with automatically selected number of phases. On high end boards, that rarely means using all the phases at full stock load.
post #1399 of 1989
Quote:
Originally Posted by cssorkinman View Post

I can see now that you have little interest in any truth that challenges your beliefs. Your presence has little value here.

I appreciate your input on that.thumb.gif
post #1400 of 1989
Now, back to the topic.

Based on the boards vrm info posted here and on other places I have compiled a spreadsheet with Board vs Phases vs Fets.
My opinion on fets is not included, facts are.

If you find any errors, want to contribute, add more data just please, let me know.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1yJKXFE2Gzkw4m5Y9jLSLJQ3GxQdMf-HX4z4kUxRW3OU/edit?usp=sharing
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