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NVIDIA GTX 1080 Ti Owner's Club - Page 583

post #5821 of 10504
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlimJ87D View Post

Look at my post above. My system with an FE when it was stock would draw 434 Watts. The FTW3 will draw 30 to 50 watts more than a stock FE.

Do you really want to risk running your PSU close to 100%? Ill tell you it won't last long.

I was thinking of picking up a EVGA 750W G3 maybe the 850w version. But if it let me run stock speeds for both for a few days I'll wait until I get the card to order the new PSU.
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post #5822 of 10504
I am in the market for a aftermarket 1080ti soon. I am reading and seeing reviews that say a entry level $700 1080ti(aftermarket) will net you within 1% of the same performance of the high end $750-$780 USD units after overclocking. Is there any reason to get a high end 1080TI that I am missing? I mean what is 50-80 bucks when you are dropping $700+ on a card but is there any tangible benefits of custom bios or anything like that?
post #5823 of 10504
Quote:
Originally Posted by phenom01 View Post

I am in the market for a aftermarket 1080ti soon. I am reading and seeing reviews that say a entry level $700 1080ti(aftermarket) will net you within 1% of the same performance of the high end $750-$780 USD units after overclocking. Is there any reason to get a high end 1080TI that I am missing? I mean what is 50-80 bucks when you are dropping $700+ on a card but is there any tangible benefits of custom bios or anything like that?
It all depends on silicon and winning the lottery. Buying a more expensive AIB card is in some way hedging the bet. Better cooling and components will help mediocre silicon become better, so to speak. Buying a vanilla FE will not guarantee anything as buying a $800 AIB will not guarantee anything. its pure luck of the draw. If you arent chasing FPS or benchmarks, by all means go with the cheapest card. If you are not looking to watercool, personally AIB is the way to go.
    
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post #5824 of 10504
Quote:
Originally Posted by phenom01 View Post

I am in the market for a aftermarket 1080ti soon. I am reading and seeing reviews that say a entry level $700 1080ti(aftermarket) will net you within 1% of the same performance of the high end $750-$780 USD units after overclocking. Is there any reason to get a high end 1080TI that I am missing? I mean what is 50-80 bucks when you are dropping $700+ on a card but is there any tangible benefits of custom bios or anything like that?

I can sneak form experience, an FE clocked at the same clocks as an aib will perform 1-2% different

I just shunt my card and although clocks are consistent and I'm not being powerful limited, it's just a 1%-3% improvement.

But if you have a golden FE it can really hold you back. The FE cannot do above 2100 Mhz and above without power limit. But again, hitting 2100 Mhz is still rare and not easy.
Edited by SlimJ87D - 4/17/17 at 6:23pm
post #5825 of 10504
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlimJ87D View Post

Unlocking the FE's true potential

After hitting power limits, I could not take it anymore. I knew that it was time for be to do the shunt mod. My card could bench at 2114 Mhz in heaven, and I believe it could go higher. After all, I've seen it boost to 2138 Mhz before without crashing.

I found it as a OC member, it was irresponsible for me to have so much potential thrown away. My theory was that I had a pretty nice golden card. That theory was proved to me today.

What I needed to prepare for

The shunt mod, if done right without too much CLU, will drop your 100% to 75-80%. This means that at 75%-80% you are drawing 300-310 Watts.This can be dangerous because at 120%, that is 450 Watts!

Because I set out to perform this shunt mod, I need to upgrade my cooling. My x41 was nearly at its limits. The liquid temperature was at 40C and my GPU temperatures stock was at 48C. If efficiency was 100%, then liquid and GPU temperatures would be equal according to newton's energy equation. Thus, I knew there was things I could do.

1. I could improve the TIM in between my shim and heat pump. Originally, I was planning to CLU the die and other side of the shim, but after looking online, CLU is really bad for dies from a RMA stand point, it leaves stains. So I decided to just use Gelid Extreme on the die and CLU on the shim and pump. Eureka, this got liquid temperatures from 40C to 44C, this means that more heat was being transferred to the radiator.

2. The midplate is a heatsink itself. It is connected to VRMs, VRAMs and other components. If I was going to introduce more watts to this card, I need to keep them cool. Originally I had placed 8 heatsinks on my midplate. This dropped my core temperature from 51C to 48C. Taking thermal measurements, the shims were at 36C. I knew that if I added more heatsinks, specially closer to the VRMs, it would help with the extra 50 to 75 Watts.



3. Finally, the backplate was not absorbing any heat whatsoever. The aluminum plate is somewhat thin, my theory is that the plate was too thin to absorb heat from the GPU, it would cause warping and flexing. But using my engineering knowledge and deduction, I knew that my AIO was keeping my GPU at 48C, so 45-60C wouldn't harm the back plate at all. So I added a thermal pad in between the back of the GPU and the backplate.




The shunt mod

For my shunt mod, I used CLU and liquid electrical tape.





My results

My previous calculations were correct. From the shunt mod, running a light heaven, I was drawing 300-310 Watts at 75-80% power draw. That means at 100%, I would be drawing 400 Watts.

At max, my card was drawing 95-100%, which mean I was drawing 400 Watts. This is confirmed below!



Here are my thermal results

Stock at 300 Watts, 48C.

Shunt modded at 400 Watts, 50C

All my modifications have successfully fought off the incoming 100 Watts.

After some light benchmarks, I can easily hit 2152 Mhz @ 1.093v with no limiting.



I have decided to call it a day and spend time with my wife. I have not pushed this card to is maximum core clock yet.

With great power... comes great responsibility... Conclusion

This card is now drawing 100 extra watts, which is very dangerous. Because I do not want a $700 paper weight, my next step is to find a balance between my maximum core clock and voltage and try to limit my power draw to 350-375 Watts.

Do I recommend this mod?
To people on water, yes!

To people on AIO, maybe. You must take the extra steps I did to ward off that 100 Watts of extra heat that will be coming to your card.

To people on AIR, No. I do not recommend this mod to people on air. It can potentially be dangerous.

To people with partner cards. Maybe... you have to think about it, you're adding 33% more power and that can increase your temperatures by 33% as a rough estimate. It can be counter productive due to thermal throttling. And if you don't take extra pre-cautions to cool your card, it can blow up!

Grats smile.gif looks like it worked real well for you

Quote:
Originally Posted by SlimJ87D View Post

I can sneak form experience

Awesome, I type really badly too smile.gif
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post #5826 of 10504
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nico67 View Post

Grats smile.gif looks like it worked real well for you
Awesome, I type really badly too smile.gif

Yeah, was talking my dog and swype texting with phone, not easy lol.
post #5827 of 10504
Is it really worth it to bother with backplates? Gamers Nexus just did a review of 1080 Ti with a copper part on the backplate and concluded it made no difference.
post #5828 of 10504
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterOC View Post

Is it really worth it to bother with backplates? Gamers Nexus just did a review of 1080 Ti with a copper part on the backplate and concluded it made no difference.

Link? If there's no contact between the back of the gpu and the backplate then nothing will happen. It can make things actually worse.

I applied a thermal pad to heat the backplate up and take heat away. Before the backplate was at like 40C, not it is 60C so heat is being transferred to it for sure.
post #5829 of 10504
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterOC View Post

Is it really worth it to bother with backplates? Gamers Nexus just did a review of 1080 Ti with a copper part on the backplate and concluded it made no difference.

It makes a huge difference if you pad the plate and the PCB. Otherwise, its worse than having no backplate because the stale air layer acts as an insulator and actually increases temperatures for the components covered by the plate.

Back in ye olde days with the AMD 290 which had insanely hot VRMs, I used to pad the backplate around the VRAM and VRM area. It got like super hot to touch so I attached an old GT220 cooling blower to the backplate and it dropped the VRM temps by close to 10 degrees.
post #5830 of 10504
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dasboogieman View Post

It makes a huge difference if you pad the plate and the PCB. Otherwise, its worse than having no backplate because the stale air layer acts as an insulator and actually increases temperatures for the components covered by the plate.

Yep, I actually proved that today.

My backplate was at 40C before and now it is at 60C because of the thermal pad.

But I don't recommend adding a thermal pad if you are not AIO. Your plate can go up to or past 100C on air.

This is for the FE. Partner cards back plates are usually thicker.
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