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Skyl3r's Chill Build Log - Page 9

post #81 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyl3r View Post

Yeah, the GPU waterblocks are acrylic with copper base. The CPU waterblock is copper and acetal. From what I've seen acetal and alcohol play along fine, but alcohol will cause acrylic to crack.
If you have a full copper waterblock, you could absolutely do alcohol.
nice! yeah i could easily design and machine out some blocks, i have access to 5 cnc machines at work biggrin.gif time to start planning out the build
post #82 of 113
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by empower View Post

nice! yeah i could easily design and machine out some blocks, i have access to 5 cnc machines at work biggrin.gif time to start planning out the build

Be sure to make a build log! Always interested to see custom waterblocks.
Are you doing phase change?
post #83 of 113
not 100% set yet, still doing research, i do want it to run stable 24/7 at the lowest temps possible.
post #84 of 113
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by empower View Post

not 100% set yet, still doing research, i do want it to run stable 24/7 at the lowest temps possible.

When comparing phase change and TECs, I think it's easy to say that you will get lower temps and spend less getting there with phase change.
If you go over to the TEC forum, you'll see a lot of the people over there love TECs because of their simplicity. They're easy to work with, require nothing but some electrical knowledge and some cash.

Meanwhile an AC build like I did can achieve subzero for pretty cheap but you run into obstacles like I mentioned before. The condenser fan is LOUD, it gets real hot and can easily warm the place up and it's sort of huge too.

But if you can find a picture of @lzf995 small phase change unit, you can see that they don't have to be that way at all. His has a little condenser with a 120mm fan. Draws 65w iirc and can keep his CPU at freezing.

With custom phase change units, you need to be able to purchase the refrigerant and you need the hardware to charge the system, but there's guys on here running -40c 24/7.
post #85 of 113
i know i dont wanna do TEC, so i guess that leaves phase change.

i was thinking, is a chill box absolutely necessary? most condensation would be on the cooling block, what if the mobo/vid card were mounted upside down so no moisture would drip on them?

if i do go the AC route, i'd put the pump/fan etc outside the house and just route the necessary piping inside, def dont wanna deal with noise
post #86 of 113
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by empower View Post

i know i dont wanna do TEC, so i guess that leaves phase change.

Yeah. There's a million combinations and different ways to achieve similar results, but overall, I'm not aware of alternatives besides phase change and thermoelectric cooling solutions.


Quote:
Originally Posted by empower View Post

i was thinking, is a chill box absolutely necessary? most condensation would be on the cooling block, what if the mobo/vid card were mounted upside down so no moisture would drip on them?

Nope! Not at all. People who opt for chillboxes tend to do it for a couple reasons. I typically see:
  1. First and foremost, to my knowledge, the idea was invented to avoid the problem of condensation. That is, when things get below the dew point, you'll have water condensing on your motherboard! That's bad news. Also, if you have your system below freezing, you'll get frost build up too. Frost is not conductive, but if it's freezing and melting from the heatload of your computer, then you have a serious issue on hand. Chillboxes aim to avoid the whole problem but catching any moisture in the radiator.
  2. A chillbox chills the entire computer with relative ease. Rather than insulating your entire motherboard and graphics card(s), the chillbox allows you to just toss whatever hardware you want into it and it works fine. For systems with a northbridge, you also get the northbridge chilled too, which can be pretty helpful.
  3. It's kinda cool. I'm not gonna lie, the idea of having a box where the atmosphere inside it is dry and frigid is kinda cool. It's even cooler when your computer is inside it.


All that said, there's a couple trade offs. Space constraint being a big one. Do you have room for a big insulated box and a reservoir that can fit an AC evaporator in it? If so, maybe this is the right idea for you. If not, might wanna look into some smaller solutions. I personally don't have the room, so I'm digging into some other ideas right now.
The other trade off is that you're losing some efficiency that's proportional to how well or poorly you've insulated the chillbox.


In a direct die setup, the phase change is happening in a block that's sitting ontop of the processor, so the efficiency is at a maximum, assuming the block was made well.

(In case you're unfamiliar with the terms, in extreme cooling we have "liquid chillers" which cool a liquid that's run through a watercooling loop basically, and direct die which means that the cooling solution is in direct contact with the surface to be cooled. So a TEC would be sitting directly on the processor, or the evaporator in the phase change unit would be directly in contact with the processor)



Typically, if you're going to not use a chillbox, you'd want a layer of waterproofing, then insulation. You'll also want to protect sockets with dielectric grease.
For condensation-proofing I've seen people use:
  • Conformal spray
  • Clear Nail polish
  • Vaseline
  • Art eraser

and there's probably many more options.
For insulation, I normally see people use neoprene or some other closed cell foam insulation.
Edited by Skyl3r - 4/21/17 at 6:39am
post #87 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyl3r View Post

Yeah. There's a million combinations and different ways to achieve similar results, but overall, I'm not aware of alternatives besides phase change and thermoelectric cooling solutions.
Nope! Not at all. People who opt for chillboxes tend to do it for a couple reasons. I typically see:
  1. First and foremost, to my knowledge, the idea was invented to avoid the problem of condensation. That is, when things get below the dew point, you'll have water condensing on your motherboard! That's bad news. Also, if you have your system below freezing, you'll get frost build up too. Frost is not conductive, but if it's freezing and melting from the heatload of your computer, then you have a serious issue on hand. Chillboxes aim to avoid the whole problem but catching any moisture in the radiator.
  2. A chillbox chills the entire computer with relative ease. Rather than insulating your entire motherboard and graphics card(s), the chillbox allows you to just toss whatever hardware you want into it and it works fine. For systems with a northbridge, you also get the northbridge chilled too, which can be pretty helpful.
  3. It's kinda cool. I'm not gonna lie, the idea of having a box where the atmosphere inside it is dry and frigid is kinda cool. It's even cooler when your computer is inside it.


All that said, there's a couple trade offs. Space constraint being a big one. Do you have room for a big insulated box and a reservoir that can fit an AC evaporator in it? If so, maybe this is the right idea for you. If not, might wanna look into some smaller solutions. I personally don't have the room, so I'm digging into some other ideas right now.
The other trade off is that you're losing some efficiency that's proportional to how well or poorly you've insulated the chillbox.


In a direct die setup, the phase change is happening in a block that's sitting ontop of the processor, so the efficiency is at a maximum, assuming the block was made well.

(In case you're unfamiliar with the terms, in extreme cooling we have "liquid chillers" which cool a liquid that's run through a watercooling loop basically, and direct die which means that the cooling solution is in direct contact with the surface to be cooled. So a TEC would be sitting directly on the processor, or the evaporator in the phase change unit would be directly in contact with the processor)



Typically, if you're going to not use a chillbox, you'd want a layer of waterproofing, then insulation. You'll also want to protect sockets with dielectric grease.
For condensation-proofing I've seen people use:
  • Conformal spray
  • Clear Nail polish
  • Vaseline
  • Art eraser

and there's probably many more options.
For insulation, I normally see people use neoprene or some other closed cell foam insulation.
space is not an issue, got tons of it
do you put HD etc in the chill box also?
i need to figure out how to send you an invite to discord, haha
post #88 of 113
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by empower View Post

space is not an issue, got tons of it
do you put HD etc in the chill box also?
i need to figure out how to send you an invite to discord, haha

No, I did not put HDDs or SSDs in the box. I know that HDDs do not like the cold. I'm not sure about SSDs, but it's not like they're gonna really benefit from being in the chillbox, so I played it safe.

Also, most people wouldn't put the PSU in the box either. No point in having the extra heat load. So all that would be in the box is the motherboard and all the components on it.
If you don't have the pump(s) in the chillbox, remember that chilled liquid will be going through them and the pump most likely won't handle the condensation that will build up.
Edited by Skyl3r - 4/21/17 at 7:27am
post #89 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyl3r View Post

Typically, if you're going to not use a chillbox, you'd want a layer of waterproofing, then insulation. You'll also want to protect sockets with dielectric grease.
For condensation-proofing I've seen people use:
  • Conformal spray
  • Clear Nail polish
  • Vaseline
  • Art eraser

and there's probably many more options.
For insulation, I normally see people use neoprene or some other closed cell foam insulation.

Clean the board free of dust get a few bottles of cheap nail Polish paint an think even coat on let it dry well then put a thin layer of are eraser down around the socket then put some Vaseline in the socket and warm it up with hair drier to melt it in the pins then put the cpu in then put more eraser around the IHS and then cut a bit of closed cellfoam make sure it has a good seal them put the waterblock on and make sure it seals against the block then its done..
 
Intel Xeon Club!
(1 photos)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
athlon ii 640 unlocked to phenom ii x6 msi 970a g43  gtx 480 1GHZ g.skill 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
wd  wd  segate  segate  
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
360 rad 750lph pump  custom built cpu block  3 50cfm led fans 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
as ceramic gtx 480 ek fullcover 240x60mm rad 2 50 cfm fans at 7volt 
CoolingOSPowerCase
550lph @17volt windows 7 ultimate antec 750w hcg table top 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
fx 4100 msi 970a g43 PNY GTX 295 6gb hyper x 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
500gb WD blue 1tb hgst 2.5" 320 WD Black lg 
CoolingOSMonitorPower
my hand made peltier waterchiller windows 10 pro 64 bit 26" 1080p antec 750 high current gamer 
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Intel Xeon Club!
(1 photos)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
athlon ii 640 unlocked to phenom ii x6 msi 970a g43  gtx 480 1GHZ g.skill 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
wd  wd  segate  segate  
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
360 rad 750lph pump  custom built cpu block  3 50cfm led fans 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
as ceramic gtx 480 ek fullcover 240x60mm rad 2 50 cfm fans at 7volt 
CoolingOSPowerCase
550lph @17volt windows 7 ultimate antec 750w hcg table top 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
fx 4100 msi 970a g43 PNY GTX 295 6gb hyper x 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
500gb WD blue 1tb hgst 2.5" 320 WD Black lg 
CoolingOSMonitorPower
my hand made peltier waterchiller windows 10 pro 64 bit 26" 1080p antec 750 high current gamer 
Case
no case yet 
  hide details  
Reply
post #90 of 113
Thread Starter 
Anyone heard of http://under-the-ice.com ?

Liking the look of those Chilly1 Evaps...
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