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post #91 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by caenlen View Post

I think the James Webb Space Telescope is going to transform a lot of our understanding of science in 2019 when it takes over the Hubble.

If it is 4-6x more powerful than Hubble, that means it can see further away (/back in time) in which case... lets say it sees a galaxy 15.9 billion years away... would that disprove the big bang theory and its 13.8 billion year old calculation?

That's...not how it works. The age of the universe calculation isn't made simply by looking for things that are far away. Also, "4-6x more powerful" is the translation made to science reporters. The details of how far it can see, what brightness of things it can see, and how close two things can be and be distinguishable are much more complicated.
post #92 of 105
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Originally Posted by Mand12 View Post

That's...not how it works. The age of the universe calculation isn't made simply by looking for things that are far away. Also, "4-6x more powerful" is the translation made to science reporters. The details of how far it can see, what brightness of things it can see, and how close two things can be and be distinguishable are much more complicated.

It is, it's just one thing. Background radiation but we can't measure the this as it's ever expanding sooooo anyways. It would be very hard to do that though.


I'm reading a bunch of this and that. And I'm not quoting or "correcting" anything I posted earlier. The problem is while they do move we can't say how much as different people have said physics falls apart after the event horizon. I did say after the event horizon reality looses cohesion. At least we have no explanation or idea of what happens there on.

They could move, or they aren't what's moving. We will never know, humanity might but we for sure won't. You could argue space has no mass.... then again there is the argument that large objects can even bend space around them.

There is no winning with a black hole until we know what happens after the event horizon
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post #93 of 105
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Originally Posted by caenlen View Post

I think the James Webb Space Telescope is going to transform a lot of our understanding of science in 2019 when it takes over the Hubble.

If it is 4-6x more powerful than Hubble, that means it can see further away (/back in time) in which case... lets say it sees a galaxy 15.9 billion years away... would that disprove the big bang theory and its 13.8 billion year old calculation?

If, and that's a really big if mind you, that were to be the case it could mean a lot of things, most likely it would mean that we live in a cyclical big bounce universe rather than an ever expanding universe. Less likely it would say that the big bang, and Einstein were totally wrong, and if history has taught scientists anything, it's that betting against Einstein is a bad idea.
post #94 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by DNMock View Post

If, and that's a really big if mind you, that were to be the case it could mean a lot of things, most likely it would mean that we live in a cyclical big bounce universe rather than an ever expanding universe. Less likely it would say that the big bang, and Einstein were totally wrong, and if history has taught scientists anything, it's that betting against Einstein is a bad idea.

They are using all the telescopes on the earth to take a picture of a black hole, the composite will be done in a few months. It's going to answer a few questions, or just mock us. You know, science.
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post #95 of 105
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Originally Posted by mushroomboy View Post

They are using all the telescopes on the earth to take a picture of a black hole, the composite will be done in a few months. It's going to answer a few questions, or just mock us. You know, science.

what are you talking about? And what does the composite image of Saggitarius A* have to do with the hypothetical question of "what would happen if the James Webb Space Telescope was able to identify a galaxy some 15+ billion light years away?"
Edited by DNMock - 4/22/17 at 7:22am
post #96 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by DNMock View Post

what are you talking about? And what does the composite image of Saggitarius A* have to do with the hypothetical question of "what would happen if the James Webb Space Telescope was able to identify a galaxy some 15+ billion light years away?"

oh man, i was trying to quote who you quoted and this was supposed to be about the telescope comment. As getting real info on a black whole is actually going to be massive. Haha, I think I was reading the quote you replied too and completely ignored yours It was a long day.
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post #97 of 105
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Originally Posted by mushroomboy View Post

As getting real info on a black whole is actually going to be massive.

Funny.
post #98 of 105
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Originally Posted by Ghoxt View Post

While I agree the phenomena that we are seeing that occured 8 billion years ago is interesting, I'm not so arrogant to postulate that we "Humans" have any idea what is actually ongoing outside out small range of Light, Atmospheric Pressure and Symptoms of Gravity that are local to us.

Lol what?
How did you get onto this forum!
post #99 of 105
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Originally Posted by Mand12 View Post

Funny.

Yeah pun not intended.... lol
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post #100 of 105
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Originally Posted by spinFX View Post

Lol what?
How did you get onto this forum!

 

You may want to re-read what I stated. I said "OUTSIDE" what is available to us. Unless you think that our earth temperatures and atmospheric pressures are exactly replicated on all remote space systems exactly everywhere and on every planet. How many planets have we visited directly vs how many we know are in our galaxy. How many are thought to have gravitational pressures innumerable times stronger than earth, and what new elements might be there, unless we think our Periodic Table is all there is? IIRC new elements were just added recently by scientists which is great...

 

Sure we know tons about what is here on earth, and what comes to us via electromagnetic radiation (s) from afar, red shifts etc. There's a reason we send probes out in space and CIRN still operates. It's because we still have tons to learn. Please don't mistake what I said or assume what i meant, especially like the recent stupidity that's been going around, Like the earth is flat....duh we know its flat j/k. 

:rolleyes:

 

Are we masters of Gravity? Do we understand the human brain fully? No and No. My "arrogant" comment has been taken out of context clearly. I went through physics in like many of us and have great respect for those that make it their livelyhood. But if it makes you feel comfortable thinking that our scientists can sit on their butts and do no further research or that they have it ALL figured out, fine. No Worries. I didn't mean to shock a select many of you by not drinking the "We know it all" cool-aid.

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