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[MIT] Edible CRISPR Could Replace Antibiotics

post #1 of 68
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https://www.technologyreview.com/s/604126/edible-crispr-could-replace-antibiotics/
Quote:
The way it works is that bacteria store memories of viral DNA in their own genomes as “clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats”—or CRISPRs. They use this memory, plus a DNA-slicing enzyme known as a Cas to recognize and chop up the genes of invading bacteriophage.

Van Pijkeren’s idea is to use bacteriophage to send a false message to C. difficile, one that instead causes the bacteria to make lethal cuts to its own DNA.

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post #2 of 68
sounds like a source for a zombie outbreak.

breaking up DNA of the bacteria could cause spontaneous mutations.
and theres even concern whether the host plus the multitudes of symbiotic bacterias are immune to those bacteriophages.
post #3 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic1337 View Post

sounds like a source for a zombie outbreak.

breaking up DNA of the bacteria could cause spontaneous mutations.
and theres even concern whether the host plus the multitudes of symbiotic bacterias are immune to those bacteriophages.

Well mice and animal testing come first I am sure, I mean everything takes at least a decade to even make it to the FDA so eh we'll see. Hopefully it is a solid idea though, one way or another, I think scientists will find ways to counter superbugs, a few million people may need to die before it gets fast tracked, but yeah. lol
    
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post #4 of 68
i'm not sure live testing it at the moment is a good idea, i mean even if the test subjects are mice instead then we'd have a zombified mice outbreak.
we'd be overrun by man-eating undying mice that can infect other mice and rats... how many millions or billions of rats do we have within a city?

at the very least they should do it on a highly secured facility, with multiple ways to immediately eradicate any runaway experiments.
to point out, look at "The Hive" research facility and their top of the line security system, all it took was one vial to destroy the entire facility.
Edited by epic1337 - 4/17/17 at 11:25pm
post #5 of 68
Are we really raising safety concerns by citing some stupid movie?
post #6 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpankyMcFlych View Post

Are we really raising safety concerns by citing some stupid movie?
isn't that the origin of zombies? mind you that its a running gag for anything genetics related. wink.gif

otherwise, explain to me, scientifically, why the concept of zombies even came to be.
Edited by epic1337 - 4/18/17 at 12:11am
post #7 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by caenlen View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic1337 View Post

sounds like a source for a zombie outbreak.

breaking up DNA of the bacteria could cause spontaneous mutations.
and theres even concern whether the host plus the multitudes of symbiotic bacterias are immune to those bacteriophages.

Well mice and animal testing come first I am sure, I mean everything takes at least a decade to even make it to the FDA so eh we'll see. Hopefully it is a solid idea though, one way or another, I think scientists will find ways to counter superbugs, a few million people may need to die before it gets fast tracked, but yeah. lol

From what I've heard (directly from conversations with a nurse) they can use natural selection to kill Superbugs, which are not very competitive in a thriving bacterial ecosystem.
The conversation wasn't too in depth but apparently they sometimes feed fecal matter into someone's stomach.
post #8 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILoveHighDPI View Post

From what I've heard (directly from conversations with a nurse) they can use natural selection to kill Superbugs, which are not very competitive in a thriving bacterial ecosystem.
The conversation wasn't too in depth but apparently they sometimes feed fecal matter into someone's stomach.

That might work for infections of the digestive tract, but what about blood infections? Or tuberculosis? STDs?

We need alternatives to antibiotics, this seems fairly promising. I'd be interested in seeing whether it's possible to evolve an effective defence against this.
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post #9 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by NihilOC View Post

That might work for infections of the digestive tract, but what about blood infections? Or tuberculosis? STDs?

We need alternatives to antibiotics, this seems fairly promising. I'd be interested in seeing whether it's possible to evolve an effective defence against this.

most of those aren't bacterial types, getting rid of viruses by destructive DNA splicing is much harder since they don't have a self-sustained structure.
technically speaking, viruses aren't living things.

imho, its probably much easier to develop a bacteria which absorbs viruses, its like a synthetic white blood cell.
Edited by epic1337 - 4/18/17 at 1:43am
post #10 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic1337 View Post

most of those aren't bacterial types, getting rid of viruses by destructive DNA splicing is much harder since they don't have a self-sustained structure.

technically speaking, viruses aren't living things.

Well I mean tuberculosis is a bacterial infection, as are gonorrhea, syphilis, and chlamydia.

I think the main thing is that we don't hear about bacterial infections as much these days, or treat them as seriously, because they're treatable with antibiotics.
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