Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel - General › 4k gaming rig need help
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

4k gaming rig need help - Page 5

post #41 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by chessmyantidrug View Post

In my time on these forums, I've seen a lot of bad advice, but this probably takes the cake. If you plan on streaming 720p or higher gameplay with a high(er) bit rate, no i3 on the market will do the job better than any Ryzen CPU currently available. Neither would any i5. I wouldn't recommend anything less than an i7 from Intel or an R5 1600 from AMD for streaming. Older 6- and 8-core AMD CPUs are also better for streaming than i3s and i5s. The extra cores/threads mean more than clock speed in that specific task.
Meant streaming as in watching streams, not outbound streaming from your computer. In an earlier post that is clarified. Obviously a streamer would benefit from a 1700- when AMD first launched it one of their marketing claims was that it beat the 7700k in terms of streaming ability.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuruptx View Post

I have kept this build I'm on for almost five years or over now, and I like to keep the build about 6 years, so I just hope this 1700 will do that just fine for me as all I do is game, watch youtube, twitch, movies etc.
game, watch youtube, twitch, movies
That's streaming, am I mistaken?
Quote:
Originally Posted by chessmyantidrug View Post

I'm guessing you don't know the difference between NVMe and AHCI SSDs since you offer a blanket recommendation of a M.2 SSD. There's virtually no difference in performance when comparing a SATA SSD to its M.2 counterpart. The difference is literally negligible. However, a NVMe SSD does offer a performance boost over AHCI. The vast majority of users wouldn't really benefit from NVMe. In order to actually benefit from the extra speed, you need to be performing drive-intensive tasks and save time from simply having a faster drive. The average user isn't doing that.
I do know the difference, NVMe and AHCI are protocols, M.2, PCIe, and SATA are ports. I made the mistake of not including the NVMe tag when I mentioned M.2, but it should have been fairly obvious. Not only are NVMe drives more common in terms of advertising (search M.2 SSD on google and you'll see which show up as buying options), but for this rig there's no point in getting an AHCI M.2 drive. It's only slower, and this isn't an SFF build, so NVMe is the only viable option. I understand my poor choice in wording came across as a "blanket recommendation" for all M.2 form factor drives, but I believe context clues suggest that I meant NVMe.

I watched a LinusTechTips video on the subject a couple months ago, that's where my knowledge comes from. No personal experience as I have already implied... all I know about NVMe performance is from reviews and recommendations around the web.

Nevertheless, I stand by my point that it will be noticeably superior to a SATA SSD (if configured properly). Near-instant boot times was hyperbole, but it's significantly faster than a SATA III SSD.
post #42 of 76
I still wouldn't recommend an i5 when there's an identically priced and performing 6C/12T CPU available. It's well documented that more cores and threads age better.

If the only time I would actually feel the difference with a NVMe drive is on startup, it's a waste of money. If you disagree, you're more than welcome to waste your money, but don't suggest someone else waste theirs.
post #43 of 76
As i said earlier Linus Tech Tips made a video not too long ago that showed that M.2 NVMe SSD´s offers zero performance over SATA III SSD´s in games
They help with system boot times yes but for loading in games there is zero gain and is therefore a waste of money if you want faster load times in games.
Edited by shilka - 4/26/17 at 5:06pm
Seravee
(23 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core I7 6850K Gigabyte X99 Ultra Gaming EVGA GTX 1080 FTW2 Kingston HyperX DDR4 Savage 3000 MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 840 Evo WD Green WD40EZRX  WD Green WD60EZRX  WD Red WD80EFZX 8TB  
Optical DriveCoolingCoolingOS
LG CH12NS30 5x Noctua NF-A14 FLX Noctua NH-D15S Windows 7 64 Bit 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Asus PG279Q Corsair Gaming Strafe RGB EVGA SuperNova G2 750 watt Phanteks Enthoo Luxe 
MouseMouse PadAudioAudio
Roccat Kone XTD Laser Roccat Sense Metor Sennheiser HD 598 Onkyo TX NR646  
AudioOtherOther
Harman Kardon HKTS 60 CableMod E series PSU cable set CableMod LED Strips 
  hide details  
Reply
Seravee
(23 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core I7 6850K Gigabyte X99 Ultra Gaming EVGA GTX 1080 FTW2 Kingston HyperX DDR4 Savage 3000 MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 840 Evo WD Green WD40EZRX  WD Green WD60EZRX  WD Red WD80EFZX 8TB  
Optical DriveCoolingCoolingOS
LG CH12NS30 5x Noctua NF-A14 FLX Noctua NH-D15S Windows 7 64 Bit 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Asus PG279Q Corsair Gaming Strafe RGB EVGA SuperNova G2 750 watt Phanteks Enthoo Luxe 
MouseMouse PadAudioAudio
Roccat Kone XTD Laser Roccat Sense Metor Sennheiser HD 598 Onkyo TX NR646  
AudioOtherOther
Harman Kardon HKTS 60 CableMod E series PSU cable set CableMod LED Strips 
  hide details  
Reply
post #44 of 76
Okay, must have missed that about the lack of M.2 viability, and I now agree. Don't get an NVMe SSD... it won't be worth anything for gaming, much less watching films/web streaming. It's a waste of money in its current state for most users. Apologies for failing to realize that earlier.
I was actually really tempted to get one and must have missed the memo on the LTT video. Maybe once Optane hits the mainstream I'll give it M.2 a chance again (though that's M.2 with an entirely new drive architecture).

Anyway, whether you want a Ryzen R5 or a Core i5 is up to you, but it's not as simple as '1600X is a better deal than 7600k because more cores age better'- Intel still wins in single core performance. Again, the workload consists of gaming, watching twitch, youtube, and movies... nothing particularly multi-core demanding. As nice as it is to have a processor that still kicks around five years later, the 1600X isn't going to do those tasks any faster than an 7600k now or later, and according to UserBenchmark fares worse in every area except high-threaded applications. It's an excellent processor for the money, but to say that a Kaby Lake i5 is a bad recommendation over it is misguided. Same goes for the rest of the Ryzen R5 CPUs. They are not "identically performing" unless it is in low power applications, in which it is a moot point.

Your current 3770k would be fantastic when paired with a new Pascal GPU, even in 4K gaming. I don't see any point in spending over $300 for a new R7 1700 that will barely offer any performance gain when the graphics card is a constant between the two systems, at least for your purposes. If you really want a new CPU, I recommend an i5 (and you could probably be fine with an i3 aside from some bottlenecks in gaming). or get a ryzen r5 i don't really care which as long as it's not over $300 for gaming only[/SI
Edited by furdieur - 4/26/17 at 1:39pm
post #45 of 76
I think you're still confused. There's nothing wrong with M.2 SSDs. When choosing between identical SATA and M.2 parts, I'll always suggest whichever is cheaper as they will perform the same.

As far as i5 versus Ryzen, that doesn't even matter to this thread because the correct option is wait for Coffee Lake. In a hypothetical where i3/i5 and R5 parts are options, the R5 option is better for the price. Every. Single. Time. But once again, that is irrelevant to this discussion because neither is a worthy upgrade over an i7-3770K. No i5 is an upgrade over an i7 and 6-core R5 CPUs don't offer enough of a boost to justify the cost.
post #46 of 76
I have not said that M.2 is bad nor that it doesn't offer any benefit, I simply redacted the claim that it would be noticeable in gaming. And obviously one would purchase the drive that offers the best performance for the money- they're not CPUs, you can have as many as you want. If you run out of room, buy another well-priced drive. I'd never advocate not getting maximum bang-for-buck when it comes to storage. I was simply incorrect about the degree of real-world benefit for M.2 for the average user, and therefore whether it would be of value in a build such as this.

My confusion was as to why one would get a 1700 for gaming. Stick with the 3770k. i5 vs R5 is irrelevant unless one is buying a new processor.
post #47 of 76
You should probably stop talking about solid state drives if you can't differentiate between interfaces and protocols.

I personally wouldn't get an R7 1700. I would much rather get an R5 1600. It's the better value. Regardless, neither is enough of an upgrade over an i7-3770K to justify the cost, at least not to me.
post #48 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by chessmyantidrug View Post

You should probably stop talking about solid state drives if you can't differentiate between interfaces and protocols.
Fail to see the relevance this bears. I haven't confused the two, I simply left out "NVMe" in my original posts. Might I mention you were the one that brought up the lack of significant real-world performance benefit for the average user whether AHCI or NVMe is used with M.2, then continued to emphasize the importance of the differentiation... a funny contraction- if an NVMe M.2 SSD and AHCI M.2 SSD offer similar gaming performance, how would saying just "M.2" be misleading, in the context of gaming?
Quote:
Originally Posted by chessmyantidrug View Post

I personally wouldn't get an R7 1700. I would much rather get an R5 1600. It's the better value. Regardless, neither is enough of an upgrade over an i7-3770K to justify the cost, at least not to me.
Agreed.

OP should simply purchase a few new components (mainly new GPU) rather than an entire rig. Waiting for OP's thoughts on this.
post #49 of 76
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by furdieur View Post

Fail to see the relevance this bears. I haven't confused the two, I simply left out "NVMe" in my original posts. Might I mention you were the one that brought up the lack of significant real-world performance benefit for the average user whether AHCI or NVMe is used with M.2, then continued to emphasize the importance of the differentiation... a funny contraction- if an NVMe M.2 SSD and AHCI M.2 SSD offer similar gaming performance, how would saying just "M.2" be misleading, in the context of gaming?
Agreed.

OP should simply purchase a few new components (mainly new GPU) rather than an entire rig. Waiting for OP's thoughts on this.

Hello!

Sorry, been very busy past two days I did order 3 parts and this is what I went with after careful consideration.

MSI GTX 1080 ti
ASUS ROG PG279Q
SAMSUNG 850 EVO 2.5" 1TB

I thought and realized this is whats going to give me most improvement in performance and I am really looking forward to Friday scheduled delivery biggrin.gif
post #50 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuruptx View Post

Hello!

Sorry, been very busy past two days I did order 3 parts and this is what I went with after careful consideration.

MSI GTX 1080 ti
ASUS ROG PG279Q
SAMSUNG 850 EVO 2.5" 1TB

I thought and realized this is whats going to give me most improvement in performance and I am really looking forward to Friday scheduled delivery biggrin.gif
Sounds like excellent choices! I don't know anything about the 850 EVO (I've always gone with Crucial cuz cheap), but Samsung SSDs are highly acclaimed. Excited to see the system benchmarks. (hopefully this weekend)

also jealous of your shiny new 1080Ti... make sure to post pics of it and the rig wink.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel - General
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel - General › 4k gaming rig need help