Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel Motherboards › Need some help (
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Need some help (

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
Hey guys,

Im in the process of building a rig for my girlfriend. Ive been slowly buying parts whenever I can, so far ive managed to grab an r9 nano, a 21:9 29 inch monitor, an e3 1270 v1, a desk, and weve finally decided on what case she wants. (there is no rhyme or reason to why I did things in that order, just when i find good deals i take them, theres no huge hurry on the rig, its one of those things i plan on slowly piecing together as I get the money)

She wants the silverstone ft03 mini itx tower. I was getting ready to click buy on that, however, I decided to look and see what lga1150 motherboards support my specific cpu. In my experience, i had never really had issues with compatibility, but i figured since its an older platform, and im using a xeon, i had better check into which motherboards support my specific cpu. Heres where im running into an issue. Ive searched through the asrock, and msi websites for all the mitx , lga1150 motherboards that specifically list support for my cpu. A LOT of then list support for the e3 1270 v2, but not the v1. Ive only managed to hunt down one mini itx motherboard that supports my cpu, and its from asrock, and is going on ebay for 250 bucks. Thats WAY too much money for a mitx motherboard, that i dont even plan to OC on, especially used. I was wondering if some of the kind people in this community could help me hunt down a mitx motherboard that supports the e3 1270 v1, for around 100 bucks. can be a little more, or a little less. Any help or suggestions are greatly appreciated.


Also, the ( in the title only happened because I accidentally clicked enter while i was attempting to put motherboard in between ().


Edit:

I ended up getting an intel mitx board. i believe it was the S1200KP
Edited by drm8627 - 5/13/17 at 7:05pm
post #2 of 3
I checked out CPU-World and they say both of those are Socket 1155, the former being Sandy Bridge and the latter being Ivy Bridge. I went to the Gigabyte website and did a motherboard search by CPU support, and searched for that processor, it didn't come up. Closest thing I saw was a E3-1275, so I clicked on that and a bunch of boards came up. I selected one that I had used in the past for a few builds, then clicked the CPU support list. Lo and behold! No E3-1275 listed but rather the E3-1270!

I'm guessing this will be a common problem trying to find correct information as to whether or not your CPU is supported on different boards. My guess would be if the others of that series (first version Xeon E3's) is supported, then there is a good chance yours will also work. You might want to hunt down a Sandy Bridge thread and see if you can find other people that have used similar Xeons and what boards they successfully used to see what would be a good candidate.

The real issue here will be motherboard quality. It will be hard to find one new and not a refurb, open box, or used item. As you noticed, some of the more specialized boards, like mini ITX, weren't made in the same quantities and variety that more generic boards were made. Since they are out of production, they fetch a premium. It might make sense to throw down $200 on a board if you have an otherwise functioning system and need that exact board for your build, but most of the time those old boards at high prices just won't be worth it.

You would probably be better off dumping that Xeon unless you can find a lucky deal on a board. A used bundle from someone upgrading could probably be had for little more than the premium price of that old board. Additionally, you could get a G4560 Hyperthreaded Pentium for ~$70 bucks with a cheap motherboard and then sell the CPU down the road if you decide to replace it with something faster. I think those Pentiums are going to hold their value for a while given their near i3 performance. If you didn't need a smaller board then you could probably hunt down a full ATX board if you kept your eyes peeled, but I think you would be better served by getting a motherboard with a full warranty that isn't at the end of its life.
post #3 of 3
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kleer Kut View Post

I checked out CPU-World and they say both of those are Socket 1155, the former being Sandy Bridge and the latter being Ivy Bridge. I went to the Gigabyte website and did a motherboard search by CPU support, and searched for that processor, it didn't come up. Closest thing I saw was a E3-1275, so I clicked on that and a bunch of boards came up. I selected one that I had used in the past for a few builds, then clicked the CPU support list. Lo and behold! No E3-1275 listed but rather the E3-1270!

I'm guessing this will be a common problem trying to find correct information as to whether or not your CPU is supported on different boards. My guess would be if the others of that series (first version Xeon E3's) is supported, then there is a good chance yours will also work. You might want to hunt down a Sandy Bridge thread and see if you can find other people that have used similar Xeons and what boards they successfully used to see what would be a good candidate.

The real issue here will be motherboard quality. It will be hard to find one new and not a refurb, open box, or used item. As you noticed, some of the more specialized boards, like mini ITX, weren't made in the same quantities and variety that more generic boards were made. Since they are out of production, they fetch a premium. It might make sense to throw down $200 on a board if you have an otherwise functioning system and need that exact board for your build, but most of the time those old boards at high prices just won't be worth it.

You would probably be better off dumping that Xeon unless you can find a lucky deal on a board. A used bundle from someone upgrading could probably be had for little more than the premium price of that old board. Additionally, you could get a G4560 Hyperthreaded Pentium for ~$70 bucks with a cheap motherboard and then sell the CPU down the road if you decide to replace it with something faster. I think those Pentiums are going to hold their value for a while given their near i3 performance. If you didn't need a smaller board then you could probably hunt down a full ATX board if you kept your eyes peeled, but I think you would be better served by getting a motherboard with a full warranty that isn't at the end of its life.

ooh man my bad. I ended up getting an intel mitx board. i believe it was the S1200KP
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel Motherboards
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel Motherboards › Need some help (