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Advice on Mobo and CPU upgrade

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hello all:

I posted this same thread in the Acronis.com True Image 2017 (ATI 2017) forum as well. but thought I'd also seek advice here as well. I use ATI 2017 for backup, and can use its Universal Restore to restore an OS to dissimilar mobo and cpu.

I am planning to make a major system upgrade. My current motherboard and CPU are 8 yrs old (ASUS Maximus II Formula and Q6700). My new mobo is an Gigabyte Z270 and cpu is i5-7600k. All other components (see my sig) will be used in place (upgrading the GPU and monitor later). On the Gigabyte I will also be using an internal PCIe MVe drive which I want to make my boot drive. All the existing disk (including my current boot drive with Windows 10 installed) are SATA.

So, I've thought of two approaches after installing the new mobo/cpu into the existing case:

Approach #1 - Connect all existing drives to the new mobo and set the current boot drive (SATA) as the boot device. It might be worth a shot just to see if the system will boot. If it does, I can then use the new Gigabyte utilities to update all the drivers. Then I could use Acronis to Clone the SATA boot drive to the MVe drive, then make the MVE drive the boot device (and repurpose the old boot drive). Somehow, though I don't think it will be that easy and I'll run into device driver issues and need Universal Restore to update the device drivers before the system will boot. So my question with this approach is could I skip the system restore (since the system is already on the current boot drive) and go straight to Universal Restore to update drivers?

Approach #2 - Maybe not even connect my old SATA boot device, and go ahead and use Acronis to restore the system disk to the MVe SSD. Then use Universal Restore to update the chipset and disk controller drivers so the system is now bootable. My fear with this approach (and it might also apply to #1) is ensuring I have all the appropriate device drivers included in the make of Universal Restore. When you build the Universal Restore, you have to provide all the chipset and disk controller drivers for the new hardware and they must be in .inf, .sys, or .oem format (not cab, msi, or exe).

Either way, once I replace the mobo and cpu, there's no easy way to go back so I have to get the new system to boot. Complicating the whole thing is I cannot find a "native" copy of the device drivers. On my CD that came with the motherboard and on the Gigabyte website, all the device drives seem to be included in a *.exe file. Been reading about how to use 7Zip to extract the drivers, but then they seem to come out as *.txt files. Is the solution just a matter of changing all the extensions to *.inf?

I would rate my skills and knowledge in this area as maybe medium. Thanks for any thoughts and advice.
post #2 of 14
I would recommend a fresh installation of the OS. While you may be able to work around the drivers (sometimes you cant even boot into the OS on a different chipset), the fresh install would ensure less headaches in the long run.
post #3 of 14
I've done a similar upgrade in the past. I wish I could remember what I did to get everything working without doing a clean install. It ended up being all for naught since I wound up having to wipe my SSD and reinstall Windows anyway. Shortcuts are all well and good, but you'll have fewer headaches with a clean install.
post #4 of 14
Ya, it's far less difficult and time consuming to just do a clean install. W10 should recognize all the devices you will need to get it up and running so you can go and download the latest versions. Or simply go ahead of time and download the newest ones from the Gigabyte website and throw them on a flash drive. Install the NVME drive, load windows and get everything up and running, then stick the old drive(s) in, migrate anything you want to and windows disk cleanup should be able to get most of the old windows install off the old drive. Or better yet, just back up anything you want to save and format the old boot drive when you install it.
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Bessy
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post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
A clean install is always my fall back. It's just that I have years of programs, and I'm not sure if I have all the original media. So I'd like to try to avoid that if I can, but I always have the option to go that route.

I'm gonna spend some more time exploring how to extract the inf files from the Gigabyte setup.exe application. I have a question into Gigabyte if there is a extract only parameter (I've heard some manufacturers do include that - something like setup.exe - extract "location). I may also pose this question in a Gigabyte forum somewhere.

But if all this fails, I can always resort to a clean install.
post #6 of 14
You can use systemprep to set windows back to default drivers and setting. A google search will have links to specific instructions on how to perform one.
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RYZEN
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Sintel
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Spare Parts
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I7 3770k @ 4.7 ASRock Z77 Extreme6 ASUS GTX 1080 Strix Samsung 30nm 1866MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Samsung 840 EVO 120Gb Samsung 840 EVO 500Gb HGST Deskstar 2Tb Samsung SH-B123L Blu-ray 
CoolingOSMonitorPower
Corsair H110i GT Windows 7 64bit 60" Sharp Aquos 1080p 120Hz Corsair AX860 
Case
Corsair 750D 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
I5 3570k @ 4.5GHz ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ASUS Radeon RX480 Strix OC Samsung Wonder RAM 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Crucial MX200 Samsung Blu-ray Corsair H100i Windows 10 64bit 
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post #7 of 14
A clean install is a good idea. However Windows 10 is much better about swapping hardware than 7 was. I've done swaps of HDDs on completely different laptops without any issues.

Backup and and try it. Might save you some time.
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Crimson Thunder
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Crossover Q27 Cougar Attack X3 SeaSonic M12II 620W  AzzA Solano 1000 Full Tower 
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post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Megaman_90 View Post

Backup and and try it. Might save you some time.

I may have found my solution,.Gigabyte tech support pointed me to the Intel chipset driver update. It is a .exe but has an "-extract " command line parameter.

I think I'l first just "backi it up and try it" as you suggest. I'll have the Universal restore with the extracted drivers ready if the first attemp doesn't work. If all else fails, clean install (and the pain that goes with it).

Thanks
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Okay, happy to report I have complete the mobo and CPU upgrade and now have my Win10 OS zooming along on the MVMe SSD M.2 drive!!

I was able to do all of this without a clean install. Windows 10 took to the h/w change like a champ!  First I ran a full backup of my C drive (which is stored on an external USB disk). After replacing the mobo and CPU and then leak testing for 24 hrs (my system is water cooled), I started the new system and booted immediately into BIOS.  Set up the BIOS as Legacy, and made my old SATA C drive the boot drive.  I saved and exited out of BIOS and the Windows boot continued.

Saw an onscreen message that Windows was "Getting devices ready" for about 30-45 seconds, and then the Windows login screen came up.  Wow!  No restore needed.  No Acronis Universal Restore needed.  Windows 10 handled it all.  I then loaded in the Gigabyte CD and ran the .exe to install/update all the drivers.  Once done I rebooted and back into windows.  Ran the Gigabyte utility (just installed) to see which drivers/applications from the CD needed updated.  Updated all of those.

Along the way I had done a lot of researching in forums on the net.  My NVMe drive is a Samsung, so I went to that site and found a Data Migration utility for cloning an old system disk onto the NVMe and making it the new boot disk. Downloaded and ran the utility which ran without a hitch.  

The I rebooted and went into BIOS, changed all the disk settings from legacy to UEFI, enabled the CSM support setting, disabled the old Sata boot drive, and made the NVMe drive the priority boot device.  Save and exited BIOS and it booted immediately into Windows from the new boot drive.

Of course Windows was not activated due to the hardware change (mine was an OEM version), but I had already purchased a USB copy of Windows 10 Pro.  All I had to do was update the product key.

All-in-all, it went better than I could have wished for.  I migrated h/w and migrated my Windows 10 without having to do a clean install.  THANKS for all the help!
post #10 of 14
I'm surprised your SSD didn't come with data migration software. The two Samsung SSDs I've purchased both came with that software.

It sounds like Windows 10 is much more tolerant of hardware changes than Windows 7. I had Windows 7 when I swapped motherboards and it was a process. I eventually had to format my SSD because something was corrupted with Skype and I couldn't upgrade to Windows 10. It was a lot of fun getting the specific updates I needed for Windows 10. I hope I never have to go through that again.
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