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Air flow in custom case. Design.

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I am designing a custom desk case. It will start out with just air cooling, but I am building this planning for water cooling in the future.

I have lots of different designs but I think these two are my favorite so far. I like picture B more than A.

Picture A would obviously have better direct air flow (intake on the right, exhaust on the left). But it makes the desk thicker.


Picture B would allow me to have a thinner desk (about 1 inch thinner for total thickness of 4 1/2 inches), but I lose the direct air flow. (same intake and exhaust flow as Picture A)


Honestly I don't think it would make much of a difference especially if/when it is water cooled, but maybe I am wrong.

I started a thread on my build here if you care to follow. I am really in the design phase, but when construction starts I will keep it updated.
post #2 of 14
Two problems with 2nd design are airflow in and out bottom could setup an airflow loop between the exhaust and intake. This would raise the air temp going in. Besides, airflow will be much better if it is all moving one directions with no turns .. in one side and out other .. and have no frames inbetween .. no back panel like normal case have, just some supports like used on bench test stations to hold PCIe mounted components.
post #3 of 14
change the orientations of some parts, like the reservoir and harddisks, so that the airflow would be more straightforward.
it'll be much more effective.

on a side note, design A can be tweaked a bit, make the radiators tilt slightly so that it'll fit in a thinner profile.
Edited by epic1337 - 9/19/17 at 5:03am
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic1337 View Post

change the orientations of some parts, like the reservoir and harddisks, so that the airflow would be more straightforward.
it'll be much more effective.

on a side note, design A can be tweaked a bit, make the radiators tilt slightly so that it'll fit in a thinner profile.
Good Idea!
Angle radiators about 30-45 degrees with fans on bottom side with bottom edge of fans flush with bottom of desk, not inside. Intake radiator with fans pushing and exhaust radiator with fans pulling so desktop case is push-pull airflow would probably give radiators best airflow. Also have exhaust radiator receiving hottest coolant and intake radiator lower temp coolant. This will make case airflow lower temp then if intake radiator was getting hottest coolant. wink.gif
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the input!
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

Two problems with 2nd design are airflow in and out bottom could setup an airflow loop between the exhaust and intake. This would raise the air temp going in. Besides, airflow will be much better if it is all moving one directions with no turns .. in one side and out other .. and have no frames inbetween .. no back panel like normal case have, just some supports like used on bench test stations to hold PCIe mounted components.

I agree with all of that. In theory that all sounds correct. But my question is, will it really make much of a difference? The intake/exhaust are nearly 3 feet apart.
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

Good Idea!
Angle radiators about 30-45 degrees with fans on bottom side with bottom edge of fans flush with bottom of desk, not inside. Intake radiator with fans pushing and exhaust radiator with fans pulling so desktop case is push-pull airflow would probably give radiators best airflow. Also have exhaust radiator receiving hottest coolant and intake radiator lower temp coolant. This will make case airflow lower temp then if intake radiator was getting hottest coolant. wink.gif
That's exactly how I am going to set up the loop.
I am not set in stone with the orientation of the devices. Most of my consideration was wire routing and the over all clean look while keeping the desk as small as possible and as practical as can be.
I did toy with the idea of having them at angle to begin with, and that led to me laying them flat. Easier to build and probably looks cleaner too. Again, it led to this question of, I know laying flat will not offer optimal air flow, but would the difference between the two really be significant enough to bother with.
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treeific View Post

Thanks for the input!
I agree with all of that. In theory that all sounds correct. But my question is, will it really make much of a difference? The intake/exhaust are nearly 3 feet apart.
That's exactly how I am going to set up the loop.
I am not set in stone with the orientation of the devices. Most of my consideration was wire routing and the over all clean look while keeping the desk as small as possible and as practical as can be.
I did toy with the idea of having them at angle to begin with, and that led to me laying them flat. Easier to build and probably looks cleaner too. Again, it led to this question of, I know laying flat will not offer optimal air flow, but would the difference between the two really be significant enough to bother with.
There's is a definite possibility it could happen. tongue.gif The intake radiator's 3x fans create a low pressure area that draws air from higher pressure areas toward it .. and the exhasut radiator's 3x fans create a high pressure area that move toward lower pressure areas. Having the radiators angled in / out will probably help eliminate the potential if it happening.

Fans do not have much pressure ability. As a comparison our we are standing with our toes in the ocean versus standing on a pier 20' above the ocean puts us at way more pressure difference than the pressure differential between intake and exhaust sides of our fans. wink.gif
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Ok I'm following you now. I'll see what I can do about the angle. I'm also going to rig up my current desk for the two different thickness's to see if it's really an issue with that one inch.
post #8 of 14
PLZ no intake radiators, nothing like having 35+c air heating up your internal hardware. Have the radaitors all exhaust. drill some couple 120mm intake fans in the front or back of the desk or filtered openings for intake. Also if you have space have a 5 gallon bucket for reservoir. Those stupid 500ml reservior serve almost no purpose and are a hassle as well as a water restriction. You almost have to place them tilted or else they look wierd and non-function in a computer desk flat. I mean in emergency those res only serve as 5 seconds of water before your pump runs dry anyways.

I've seen some designs they have the motherboard and hard drive in a higher ground as well in case of water leaks. Having it near the HDD pretty crazy. Anything pass 3 radiators isn't doing much as well. You're better off with bigger water reservoir for heating capacity. Unless you're running SLI and have a radiator between GPU and GPU component.

Also if you're already spending 100-200 dollars on wood make it have legs or at least a drawer. Nothing like someone banging on your wall or having it rekt by earthquake since u didn't bother making legs for your $1000+ pc parts.

Some video suggestions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQM1KzhYUsU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_Fx8yTb8FM
Edited by rtikphox - 9/20/17 at 7:54am
Casual Gaming Rig
(18 items)
 
My Nas Box
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
INTEL 3930K @ 4.4Ghz Asus P9X79 Deluxe Asus RX 480 4GB G. SKill 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Sandisk Ultra Plus 256GB 2x Raid 0 WD HGST WD 8TB 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Raystorm Waterblock Windows 10 64-bit BenQ 24" 144 Monitor Corsair K70 
PowerCaseMouseOther
EVGA 750watt G2 gold PSU Corsair 750D Razer Deathadder 2015 mellanox connectx-2 dual port 10gbe adapter 
OtherOther
Samsung 960 EVO Aquacomputer Kryo M.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 Adapter  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD 1090T @ stock Asrock 970A-D3 headless 16GB (8x2) DDR3 1333mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 850 Evo (boot drive) 4TB Seagate (4x raid 5) Seagate 8TB Hard Drive Seagate 4TB 
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Casual Gaming Rig
(18 items)
 
My Nas Box
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
INTEL 3930K @ 4.4Ghz Asus P9X79 Deluxe Asus RX 480 4GB G. SKill 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Sandisk Ultra Plus 256GB 2x Raid 0 WD HGST WD 8TB 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Raystorm Waterblock Windows 10 64-bit BenQ 24" 144 Monitor Corsair K70 
PowerCaseMouseOther
EVGA 750watt G2 gold PSU Corsair 750D Razer Deathadder 2015 mellanox connectx-2 dual port 10gbe adapter 
OtherOther
Samsung 960 EVO Aquacomputer Kryo M.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 Adapter  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD 1090T @ stock Asrock 970A-D3 headless 16GB (8x2) DDR3 1333mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung 850 Evo (boot drive) 4TB Seagate (4x raid 5) Seagate 8TB Hard Drive Seagate 4TB 
Hard DriveCoolingKeyboardPower
Seagate 4TB Hyper 212 Evo Logitech Wireless keyboard and mouse Coolmaster 600w 
CaseOtherOther
Fractal Design S Black mennanox connect x2 dual 10gbe network adapter LSI 6gbs RAID card 
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post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
I created a seperate space for the GPU and PSU (possibly a small 80mm fan to pull some from the CPU too) to exhaust outside of the main case. I am planning on just getting a water block for the main chip on the GPU. I would dremel the stock heat sink to allow the block to fit. This way hopefully all the ram chips and everything else will still be cooled with the stock heat sink and fan. I think I will just live with a thicker desk. Also the drawings not not exact, just to get some ideas out of my head so I can see them. I know there are parts that are not structurally sound.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rtikphox View Post

PLZ no intake radiators, nothing like having 35+c air heating up your internal hardware. Have the radaitors all exhaust. drill some couple 120mm intake fans in the front or back of the desk or filtered openings for intake. Also if you have space have a 5 gallon bucket for reservoir. Those stupid 500ml reservior serve almost no purpose and are a hassle as well as a water restriction. You almost have to place them tilted or else they look wierd and non-function in a computer desk flat. I mean in emergency those res only serve as 5 seconds of water before your pump runs dry anyways.

I've seen some designs they have the motherboard and hard drive in a higher ground as well in case of water leaks. Having it near the HDD pretty crazy. Anything pass 3 radiators isn't doing much as well. You're better off with bigger water reservoir for heating capacity. Unless you're running SLI and have a radiator between GPU and GPU component.

Also if you're already spending 100-200 dollars on wood make it have legs or at least a drawer. Nothing like someone banging on your wall or having it rekt by earthquake since u didn't bother making legs for your $1000+ pc parts.

Some video suggestions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQM1KzhYUsU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_Fx8yTb8FM

I did consider the rad as a intake would cause extra heat. I don't have SLI right now but I would like to have the option in the future. Would a 360mm rad be enough for CPU and 2X GPUs? I didnt think it would be. If I really would need more than 360mm of rad I can explore something different for the case.

Thanks for the tips on the reservoir. I have never water cooled, just researched it a bit. Do you think the MCP50X would be powerful enough to do 3 devices, 2 rads, and move water up to the 'top shelf' (3 feet?) that would be above the monitor? There is lots of space up there for a large reservoir.

All of the components will be elevated from the bottom of the case. Mostly to run wires (neatly) and hide them with a second shelf that the devices would 'sit' on.

I have see those videos you posted and believe me if I had the space to do that I would really consider it. I'm in a small apartment right now. I am really shooting for a desk/shelf with everything in one small, usable space. My current computer is mounted on a wall, badly I might add, which is why I want to redo everything so it will be much cooler and easier to maintain. My monitor is also mounted right now.
Edited by Treeific - 9/20/17 at 7:22pm
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Let me know if this is just crazy. Seems like it would cool very well, but the worst case scenarios of leaks or curious little fingers seems this could be pretty bad. I could probably protect the rads better.



I moved the radiators outside the main case. Found some large clear tubes for a decent price, the reservoir will be about that long, and either above the monitor or inside the top shelf that you can't see well in this picture. Coolant tubes will be exposed outside unless I figure out a way to house them.

The order would be pump -> cpu -> rad -> res -> rad -> pump. The pump is inside the desk/case right under neither the right rad.

I am hoping the hot air rising from the right rad will prevent a air loop on the bottom intakes.


I guess a moderator can move this to water cooling at this point. Sorry for the migration of topic.
Edited by Treeific - 9/23/17 at 6:22pm
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