Overclock.net › Forums › Industry News › Hardware News › [WCCFTECH] NVIDIA Graphics Card Prices To Continue To Rise Until December Report Claims
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

[WCCFTECH] NVIDIA Graphics Card Prices To Continue To Rise Until December Report Claims - Page 8

post #71 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kokin View Post

That's my only wish right now. I have an LG 34UC88 that ran 75Hz if Freesync was active, but my FuryX wasn't quite up to the task for demanding games. Now that I use a 1080Ti, it only runs at 60Hz, so I have reverted back to using my Qnix 1440p/110Hz for gaming.

It's a bummer that the Asus PG348Q, Acer Predator 34X or Z35P are all within $1000-1200. The price tag just seems a bit too much when similar Freesync Ultrawides are $650-800 and it doesn't help that the upcoming next gen Ultrawides are going to include 200Hz, Quantum Dot, HDR and FALD, which is a huge jump up from what is available today. I'm probably going to wait it out til the PG35VQ or X35 are released, but I'm not looking forward to the QA issues that Ultrawides seem to always have.

Have you tried overclocking it?
Ishimura
(21 items)
 
Silent Knight
(13 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 3770K @ 4.6GHz ASRock Z77E-ITX eVGA GTX 1080 Ti Hybrid AVEXIR Blitz 1.1 16GB DDR3-2400MHz CL10 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingCooling
SanDisk Ultra II 960GB Toshiba X300 5TB Corsair H100i GTX eVGA Hybrid Water Cooler  
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
4x GentleTyphoon AP-15 Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit Philips Brilliance BDM4065UC 4K Razer BlackWidow Chroma  
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
eVGA SuperNOVA 750 G3 Define Nano S Logitech G502 Proteus Core PECHAM Gaming Mouse Pad XX-Large 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Audioengine D1 DAC Mackie CR Series CR3 Audio-Technica ATH-M50 Sennheiser HD 598 
Audio
Sony XB950BT 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Phenom II X4 955 @ 4.2GHz ASUS M4A79XTD EVO AMD Radeon HD 7970 3GB @ 1200/1500 2x 4GB G.SKILL Ripjaws X DDR3-1600 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
OCZ Agility 3 60GB WD Caviar Green 1.5TB 2 x Seagate Barracuda 2TB XSPC Raystorm 
CoolingCoolingOSPower
EK-FC7970 XSPC RS360 Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit Corsair TX750 
Case
NZXT Switch 810  
  hide details  
Reply
Ishimura
(21 items)
 
Silent Knight
(13 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 3770K @ 4.6GHz ASRock Z77E-ITX eVGA GTX 1080 Ti Hybrid AVEXIR Blitz 1.1 16GB DDR3-2400MHz CL10 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingCooling
SanDisk Ultra II 960GB Toshiba X300 5TB Corsair H100i GTX eVGA Hybrid Water Cooler  
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
4x GentleTyphoon AP-15 Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit Philips Brilliance BDM4065UC 4K Razer BlackWidow Chroma  
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
eVGA SuperNOVA 750 G3 Define Nano S Logitech G502 Proteus Core PECHAM Gaming Mouse Pad XX-Large 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Audioengine D1 DAC Mackie CR Series CR3 Audio-Technica ATH-M50 Sennheiser HD 598 
Audio
Sony XB950BT 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Phenom II X4 955 @ 4.2GHz ASUS M4A79XTD EVO AMD Radeon HD 7970 3GB @ 1200/1500 2x 4GB G.SKILL Ripjaws X DDR3-1600 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
OCZ Agility 3 60GB WD Caviar Green 1.5TB 2 x Seagate Barracuda 2TB XSPC Raystorm 
CoolingCoolingOSPower
EK-FC7970 XSPC RS360 Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit Corsair TX750 
Case
NZXT Switch 810  
  hide details  
Reply
post #72 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBlademaster01 View Post

GTX 680 and GTX Titan is where the pricing went wrong. Not ultra premium chips. Pricing is still in line with this era although I'm not sure it will stay that way with how AMD performs.

Here's my take on things:

Fermi: NVIDIA just shoved out their highest-end "Big Fermi" chip at the time with as many of its cores/ROPs available that they could get away with, given their yields. From there, they cut it down a couple of times for lower models and then went to a couple of smaller chips (GF114/116) for the mid- and low-range.

GTX 480 (GF100) - 3 billion transistors - 1/8th FP64 - $499 launch price (Mar 2010)
480 CUDA / 60 TMU / 48 ROP / 1.5GB of GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width

GTX 580 (GF110) - 3b - 1/8th FP64 - $499 (Nov 2010)
512 / 64 / 48 / 1.5GB of GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width



Kepler: NVIDIA had a hell of a time getting their initial GK100 "Big Kepler" design to work, which led them to put out a GK104-based GTX 680 as their highest gaming card, which did well enough in the marketplace vs the AMD competition. By the time a true top-end chip (GK110) was both ready and had additional production numbers that would allow some to be diverted from supercomputing to consumer graphics cards, NVIDIA decided that expanding their high-end stack selling it as a ultra-premium jack-of-all-trades card would be a better idea than bumping the cards below it further down the pricing chain. It worked quite nicely, as we all know. From there, NVIDIA decided to gimp the compute capabilities of the GTX 780/780Ti as to not eat into their professional revenue and reserve FP64 performance to the Titans, Quadros, and Teslas only.

GTX 680 (GK104) - 3.5b - 1/24th FP64 - $499 (March 2012)
1536 / 128 / 32 / 2GB of 6Gbps GDDR5 @ 256-bit bus width

GTX Titan (GK110) - 7.1b - 1/3 FP64 - $999 (Feb 2013)
2688 / 224 / 48 / 6GB of 6Gbps GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width

GTX 780 (GK110) - 7.1b - 1/24th FP64 - $649 (May 2013)
2304 / 192 / 48 / 3GB of 6Gbps GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width

GTX 780 Ti (GK110) - 7.1b - 1/24th FP64 - $699 (Nov 2013)
2880 / 240 / 48 / 3GB of 7Gbps GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width

GTX Titan Black (GK110) - 7.1b - 1/3 FP64 - $999 (Feb 2014)
2880 / 240 / 48 / 6GB of 7Gbps GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width



Maxwell: This time, NVIDIA decided to not even bother with making a hardcore compute / FP64 card with their new Maxwell architecture, even for the Quadro line. GM200 was basically GM204 multiplied by 1.5x in all aspects. They learned from the Kepler consumer cards that they could forego the die-intensive compute capability to reduce costs, and still have enough performance to win in the gaming marketplace.

GTX 980 (GM204) - 5.2b - 1/32nd FP64 - $549 (Sep 2014)
2048 / 128 / 64 / 4GB of 7Gbps GDDR5 @ 256-bit bus width

GTX Titan X (GM200) - 8b - 1/32nd FP64 - $999 (Mar 2015)
3072 / 192 / 96 / 12GB of 7Gbps GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width

GTX 980 Ti (GM200) - 8b - 1/32nd FP64 - $649 (June 2015)
2816 / 176 / 96 / 6GB of 7Gbps GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width

(no compute-oriented cards in Maxwell line)



Pascal: Based on the lessons learned from Kepler and Maxwell, it's clear that NVIDIA decided to make a hard and clean break between gaming cards and compute cards. The compute-oriented GP100 Tesla and Quadro cards were made solely for the professional market and had HBM memory, while the FP32-heavy GP102 and GP104 with GDDR5/X were largely designed for the gaming market. Titans now are solely gaming cards with fewer cut-down cores, in which NVIDIA charges a premium for buyers to be on the bleeding edge of the early yield curve before a similar x80Ti card comes out 6-12 months later when yields improve.

GTX 1080 (GP104) - 8b - 1/32nd FP64 - $599 (May 2016)
2560 / 160 / 64 / 8GB of 10Gbps GDDR5X @ 256-bit bus width

GTX Titan X [Pascal] (GP102) - 12b - 1/32nd FP64 - $1200 (Aug 2016)
3584 / 224 / 96 / 12GB of 10Gbps GDDR5X @ 384-bit bus width

GTX 1080 Ti (GP102) - 12b - 1/32nd FP64 - $699 (Mar 2017)
3584 / 224 / 88 / 11GB of 11Gbps GDDR5X @ 352-bit bus width

GTX Titan Xp (GP102) - 12b - 1/32nd FP64 - $1200 (Apr 2017)
3840 / 240 / 96 / 12GB of 11.4Gbps GDDR5X @ 384-bit bus width

Quadro GP100 (GP100) - 15.3b - 1/2 FP64 - $8000(?) (Mar 2017)
3840 / 240 / 128? / 16GB of 1.4 Gbps HBM2 w/ ECC @ 4096-bit bus width



Volta: The hard separation between gaming and compute is almost certainly going to continue, especially when seeing all the exotic features like "tensor cores" going into the 810mm² GV100-based Tesla V100.

Tesla V100 (GV100) - 21b - 1/2 FP64 - $10000(?)
5120 / 336 / ??? / 16GB of 1.75 Gbps HBM2 w/ ECC @ 4096-bit bus width
Edited by svenge - 9/25/17 at 6:56pm
Julia
(11 items)
 
Centurion (Dead)
(11 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Athlon 64 3700+ EPoX EP-9NPA+ Ultra EVGA GeForce 6800 GS (256-P2-N389-AX) CORSAIR VS1GB400C3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Western Digital Caviar SE WD1600JS NEC ND-3520A Windows XP Dell M780 
PowerCaseOther
FSP Group SAGA+ 450R Cooler Master Centurion 5 w/ Window (CAC-T05-WW) Samsung Floppy Drive (SFD321B/LBL1) 
  hide details  
Reply
Julia
(11 items)
 
Centurion (Dead)
(11 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Athlon 64 3700+ EPoX EP-9NPA+ Ultra EVGA GeForce 6800 GS (256-P2-N389-AX) CORSAIR VS1GB400C3 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Western Digital Caviar SE WD1600JS NEC ND-3520A Windows XP Dell M780 
PowerCaseOther
FSP Group SAGA+ 450R Cooler Master Centurion 5 w/ Window (CAC-T05-WW) Samsung Floppy Drive (SFD321B/LBL1) 
  hide details  
Reply
post #73 of 111
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by magnek View Post

The Pascal Titans already cost $1200. Did you mean to write $1500 instead?


I never think of the titans. Im sure most "top" cards sold are the 80's then 80' ti when released.
House heater
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
4930k @ 3.9GHz Asus Rampage IV Black Edition Zotac GTX 980Ti ArcticStorm 16GB Corsair Dominator 2132MHz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
1TB x2 Samsung F3 RAID 0 LG blu-ray burner Corsair H80 Win10 Pro 64-bit 
MonitorMonitorKeyboardPower
3x 23" LG Flatron W2361VG (sexy glossy) Hisense 55" 4k tv Logitech MX5500 Corsair 850w 
CaseMouseAudio
CoolerMaster HAF-X Logitech revolution laser (MX5500 combo) Onboard SupgremeFX 
  hide details  
Reply
House heater
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
4930k @ 3.9GHz Asus Rampage IV Black Edition Zotac GTX 980Ti ArcticStorm 16GB Corsair Dominator 2132MHz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
1TB x2 Samsung F3 RAID 0 LG blu-ray burner Corsair H80 Win10 Pro 64-bit 
MonitorMonitorKeyboardPower
3x 23" LG Flatron W2361VG (sexy glossy) Hisense 55" 4k tv Logitech MX5500 Corsair 850w 
CaseMouseAudio
CoolerMaster HAF-X Logitech revolution laser (MX5500 combo) Onboard SupgremeFX 
  hide details  
Reply
post #74 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBlademaster01 View Post

It was already preceeded by GF104. But you can say it was a new class since it was the first midrange GPU to be rebranded as high end 670 Ti -> 680. Titan was the first “prosumer” GPU. Lots of marketing stunts that generation. Prosumer GPUs weren’t so successful for NVIDIA so they dropped that. Except for the miracle driver for TXp after Vega.

Wait.. wut? The Titan sold like hot cakes.
average
(11 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-4790K Asus Z97 TUF Gryphon Sapphire Radeon RX Vega 64 G.Skill TridentX 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 EVO Samsung 850 EVO NZXT Kraken X61 Windows 10 
MonitorPowerCase
LG 24GM77 Corsair AX1200i Phanteks Enthoo EVOLV ATX 
  hide details  
Reply
average
(11 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-4790K Asus Z97 TUF Gryphon Sapphire Radeon RX Vega 64 G.Skill TridentX 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 EVO Samsung 850 EVO NZXT Kraken X61 Windows 10 
MonitorPowerCase
LG 24GM77 Corsair AX1200i Phanteks Enthoo EVOLV ATX 
  hide details  
Reply
post #75 of 111
The price steadily rises up because we as consumers (gamers/miners) continue to buy them. Unfortunately, we haven't seen the GPU market crash like the days of the R9 290X and the retailers can easily charge whatever they like for increased profits. I think the high-end has been stable in terms of MSRP and until we see supplies come back to "normal" and AMD come back with competition throughout the whole stack, prices are going to stay as they are.

That said, I was always used to buying GPUs for $150-250 ever since I started with a HD4890 up until the R9 290. Last year, I got the FuryX for $380 which was already more than I ever spent on a GPU, only to be doubly surpassed by a $800 1080Ti FTW3. The price justifies the performance, although I'm sure most people don't venture out to such high resolutions/refresh rates as it gets expensive very quickly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZealotKi11er View Post

Have you tried overclocking it?

It frameskips, I haven't seen anyone actually get the 34UC88/34UC98 to run at 75Hz with an Nvidia GPU on an ITX platform. There was one person who had to run both a Freesync AMD GPU and Nvidia GPU to "trick" the monitor that it's connected to a Freesync device and even then it has to be done each time a computer is shut down or rebooted. Not even sure if they did the UFO frameskip test.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 3570K [Delid] Asrock Z77E-ITX EVGA GeForce GTX 1080Ti FTW3 HyperX Fury 16GB 1866 DDR3 HX318C10FBK2/16 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Crucial M4 256GB Silicon Power S60 120GB Western Digital Blue Scorpio 1TB Seagate Constellation 2 1TB 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
Swiftech Apogee Drive II XSPC RX240+EX240 [Painted White] 5x 2150RPM Gentle Typhoons PWM [Painted Black+W... Bitspower Water Tank Z-Multi 80 Inline Reservoir  
OSMonitorMonitorMonitor
Windows 10 LG 34UC88-B 34" Ultrawide 3440x1440 75Hz HP ZR2240w IPS Qnix QX2710 1440p 110Hz 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
WASD CODE 87-Key [MX Clear + PBT Keycaps] Seasonix X-750 Case Labs Mercury S3 Logitech G502 
AudioAudio
Sennheiser HD 598 SE Micca OriGen 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 3570K [Delid] Asrock Z77E-ITX EVGA GeForce GTX 1080Ti FTW3 HyperX Fury 16GB 1866 DDR3 HX318C10FBK2/16 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Crucial M4 256GB Silicon Power S60 120GB Western Digital Blue Scorpio 1TB Seagate Constellation 2 1TB 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
Swiftech Apogee Drive II XSPC RX240+EX240 [Painted White] 5x 2150RPM Gentle Typhoons PWM [Painted Black+W... Bitspower Water Tank Z-Multi 80 Inline Reservoir  
OSMonitorMonitorMonitor
Windows 10 LG 34UC88-B 34" Ultrawide 3440x1440 75Hz HP ZR2240w IPS Qnix QX2710 1440p 110Hz 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
WASD CODE 87-Key [MX Clear + PBT Keycaps] Seasonix X-750 Case Labs Mercury S3 Logitech G502 
AudioAudio
Sennheiser HD 598 SE Micca OriGen 
  hide details  
Reply
post #76 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rangerscott View Post

You should. In two years a top end card could cost $1200 if nvidia wants it to. Apple is gonna prove people will pay $1k for a phone here in 2017.

They are both proving that their customers will continue supporting the same profit margins year over. The costs to produce the technologies is increase with each generation, speaking to the high end, and instead of eating it in margins, they increase retail cost. When the entire chain has increased costs there are two places that can absorb those costs, in the margin or in the customers wallet. Command a strong enough brand and you can make the choice. With the high end of cell phones you have Samsung and Apple primarily. Thus the ever increasing costs you reference.

At the high end of GPUs for consumers you have Nvidia, AMD is somewhere behind them, and all the Miners are between all of us. The GPU market is the perfect sellers market, the San Francisco of the technology World. Buyers with an utterly insatiable appetite for GPUs and the cash flow via mining to support it.

Good luck to the poor Bastard working 9-5 that wants to get a game in.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 5820K AsRock Extreme6 X99 Gigabyte GTX 980 Ti Windforce OC 16 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 EVO 250GB - HDD Speed Edtition Samsung SM951 512 GB - I still hate Samsung!  Noctua NHD14 Windows 10 
MonitorMonitorMonitorKeyboard
Achieva Shimian QH270-Lite Overlord Computer Tempest X27OC  Acer Predator XB270HU Filco Majestouch 2 Ninja 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Seasonic X-1250 Fractal Design R5 Razer Naga Razer Goliathus Alpha 
AudioAudio
AKG K702 65th Anniversary Edition Creative Sound Blaster Zx 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 5820K AsRock Extreme6 X99 Gigabyte GTX 980 Ti Windforce OC 16 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 EVO 250GB - HDD Speed Edtition Samsung SM951 512 GB - I still hate Samsung!  Noctua NHD14 Windows 10 
MonitorMonitorMonitorKeyboard
Achieva Shimian QH270-Lite Overlord Computer Tempest X27OC  Acer Predator XB270HU Filco Majestouch 2 Ninja 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Seasonic X-1250 Fractal Design R5 Razer Naga Razer Goliathus Alpha 
AudioAudio
AKG K702 65th Anniversary Edition Creative Sound Blaster Zx 
  hide details  
Reply
post #77 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by svenge View Post

Here's my take on things:

Fermi: NVIDIA just shoved out their highest-end "Big Fermi" chip at the time with as many of its cores/ROPs available that they could get away with, given their yields. From there, they cut it down a couple of times for lower models and then went to a couple of smaller chips (GF114/116) for the mid- and low-range.

GTX 480 (GF100) - 3 billion transistors - 1/8th FP64 - $499 launch price (Mar 2010)
480 CUDA / 60 TMU / 48 ROP / 1.5GB of GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width

GTX 580 (GF110) - 3b - 1/8th FP64 - $499 (Nov 2010)
512 / 64 / 48 / 1.5GB of GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width



Kepler: NVIDIA had a hell of a time getting their initial GK100 "Big Kepler" design to work, which led them to put out a GK104-based GTX 680 as their highest gaming card, which did well enough in the marketplace vs the AMD competition. By the time a true top-end chip (GK110) was both ready and had additional production numbers that would allow some to be diverted from supercomputing to consumer graphics cards, NVIDIA decided that expanding their high-end stack selling it as a ultra-premium jack-of-all-trades card would be a better idea than bumping the cards below it further down the pricing chain. It worked quite nicely, as we all know. From there, NVIDIA decided to gimp the compute capabilities of the GTX 780/780Ti as to not eat into their professional revenue and reserve FP64 performance to the Titans, Quadros, and Teslas only.

GTX 680 (GK104) - 3.5b - 1/24th FP64 - $499 (March 2012)
1536 / 128 / 32 / 2GB of 6Gbps GDDR5 @ 256-bit bus width

GTX Titan (GK110) - 7.1b - 1/3 FP64 - $999 (Feb 2013)
2688 / 224 / 48 / 6GB of 6Gbps GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width

GTX 780 (GK110) - 7.1b - 1/24th FP64 - $649 (May 2013)
2304 / 192 / 48 / 3GB of 6Gbps GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width

GTX 780 Ti (GK110) - 7.1b - 1/24th FP64 - $699 (Nov 2013)
2880 / 240 / 48 / 3GB of 7Gbps GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width

GTX Titan Black (GK110) - 7.1b - 1/3 FP64 - $999 (Feb 2014)
2880 / 240 / 48 / 6GB of 7Gbps GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width



Maxwell: This time, NVIDIA decided to not even bother with making a hardcore compute / FP64 card with their new Maxwell architecture, even for the Quadro line. GM200 was basically GM204 multiplied by 1.5x in all aspects. They learned from the Kepler consumer cards that they could forego the die-intensive compute capability to reduce costs, and still have enough performance to win in the gaming marketplace.

GTX 980 (GM204) - 5.2b - 1/32nd FP64 - $549 (Sep 2014)
2048 / 128 / 64 / 4GB of 7Gbps GDDR5 @ 256-bit bus width

GTX Titan X (GM200) - 8b - 1/32nd FP64 - $999 (Mar 2015)
3072 / 192 / 96 / 12GB of 7Gbps GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width

GTX 980 Ti (GM200) - 8b - 1/32nd FP64 - $649 (June 2015)
2816 / 176 / 96 / 6GB of 7Gbps GDDR5 @ 384-bit bus width

(no compute-oriented cards in Maxwell line)



Pascal: Based on the lessons learned from Kepler and Maxwell, it's clear that NVIDIA decided to make a hard and clean break between gaming cards and compute cards. The compute-oriented GP100 Tesla and Quadro cards were made solely for the professional market and had HBM memory, while the FP32-heavy GP102 and GP104 with GDDR5/X were largely designed for the gaming market. Titans now are solely gaming cards with fewer cut-down cores, in which NVIDIA charges a premium for buyers to be on the bleeding edge of the early yield curve before a similar x80Ti card comes out 6-12 months later when yields improve.

GTX 1080 (GP104) - 8b - 1/32nd FP64 - $599 (May 2016)
2560 / 160 / 64 / 8GB of 10Gbps GDDR5X @ 256-bit bus width

GTX Titan X [Pascal] (GP102) - 12b - 1/32nd FP64 - $1200 (Aug 2016)
3584 / 224 / 96 / 12GB of 10Gbps GDDR5X @ 384-bit bus width

GTX 1080 Ti (GP102) - 12b - 1/32nd FP64 - $699 (Mar 2017)
3584 / 224 / 88 / 11GB of 11Gbps GDDR5X @ 352-bit bus width

GTX Titan Xp (GP102) - 12b - 1/32nd FP64 - $1200 (Apr 2017)
3840 / 240 / 96 / 12GB of 11.4Gbps GDDR5X @ 384-bit bus width

Quadro GP100 (GP100) - 15.3b - 1/2 FP64 - $8000(?) (Mar 2017)
3840 / 240 / 128? / 16GB of 1.4 Gbps HBM2 w/ ECC @ 4096-bit bus width



Volta: The hard separation between gaming and compute is almost certainly going to continue, especially when seeing all the exotic features like "tensor cores" going into the 810mm² GV100-based Tesla V100.

Tesla V100 (GV100) - 21b - 1/2 FP64 - $10000(?)
5120 / 336 / ??? / 16GB of 1.75 Gbps HBM2 w/ ECC @ 4096-bit bus width

Yes, with this analysis I agree. Price is directly dictated by competition. Their midrange chips relative to AMD were enough to market it as high end, and high end as ultra high end. They just maximized margins and in effect rip off the entire market, and they can get away with it.

Marketing wise everything changed from GTX 680 (don’t forget 670 Ti). Engineering wise, the only new class of GPU they have created on top of their huge monolithic die is GV100 (which is pushing the reticle limit of the most advanced steppers), and is a beast unlike we’ve seen before.

The problem is that with AMD dictating gaming developments since 2013-2014 whether culling for example FP16 units from gaming cards will cripple their cards in future games.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rei86 View Post

Wait.. wut? The Titan sold like hot cakes.

Yes, which is probably why they stopped selling them to maximize sales of Quadro and Tesla without lowering (actually increasing) prices. And those crippled cards probably also sold well at higher prices, so they have no reason to include those features anymore.
post #78 of 111
This thread has become "define mid-range". Console gaming is becoming more enticing as the years go on. I just hope once prices drop, it doesn't just happen all over again.
Home Server
(11 items)
 
Gaming PC
(18 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i3 4130  ASRock Z87 Extreme4 Motherboard  Kingston Toshiba 3tb 
Hard DriveHard DriveOSPower
Samsung 2tb Western digital 2tb Windows 7 Corsair hx1000watt 
CaseOtherOther
Lian LI d8000 Ibm m5014 Controller Chenbro Sas expander 
  hide details  
Reply
Home Server
(11 items)
 
Gaming PC
(18 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i3 4130  ASRock Z87 Extreme4 Motherboard  Kingston Toshiba 3tb 
Hard DriveHard DriveOSPower
Samsung 2tb Western digital 2tb Windows 7 Corsair hx1000watt 
CaseOtherOther
Lian LI d8000 Ibm m5014 Controller Chenbro Sas expander 
  hide details  
Reply
post #79 of 111
Surely AMD will bring some competition by 2020 right? I have no plans on upgrading from a 1080 until then.
Malinka Kalinka
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4670k 4.2GHz MSI Z97-G45 Gaming Asus GTX 980 Ti Strix G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB 1866 
Hard DriveCoolingCoolingOS
Samsung 850 EVO 500GB 6 140mm Fractal Design Case Fans Hyper 212 EVO Windows 10 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Dell S2417DG CM Storm QuickFire Rapid-i  Cooler Master V750 Fractal Design Arc Midi R2 
MouseAudioAudio
Razer Deathadder Chroma Philips Fidelio X2 Logitech Z623 200 W 2.1 Speaker System 
  hide details  
Reply
Malinka Kalinka
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 4670k 4.2GHz MSI Z97-G45 Gaming Asus GTX 980 Ti Strix G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB 1866 
Hard DriveCoolingCoolingOS
Samsung 850 EVO 500GB 6 140mm Fractal Design Case Fans Hyper 212 EVO Windows 10 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Dell S2417DG CM Storm QuickFire Rapid-i  Cooler Master V750 Fractal Design Arc Midi R2 
MouseAudioAudio
Razer Deathadder Chroma Philips Fidelio X2 Logitech Z623 200 W 2.1 Speaker System 
  hide details  
Reply
post #80 of 111
I am currently running a GTX970. Typically I game at 1080p, and run a 60hz monitor. Would a 1070 be a good upgrade right now? I more than likely will stick with 1080p for the near future.

Ya'll seem like you know what you are talking about with GPUs. So, I thought I would ask. biggrin.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Hardware News
Overclock.net › Forums › Industry News › Hardware News › [WCCFTECH] NVIDIA Graphics Card Prices To Continue To Rise Until December Report Claims