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Why does QVL list not contain the best motherboards?

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
I am evaluating a X299 build, but I noticed that SL does not pick the best X299 motherboards for its testing. I don't understand why, when we are paying top dollar for the best CPUs, you wouldn't also select the best motherboard to go with it?

Example:

X299-Deluxe is on the QVL list, but it's a prime example of a rip-off motherboard. It's $100 more expensive than a ASRock Fatal1ty X299 Professional Gaming i9, yet it has less features! No 10 Gbps Ethernet like on the ASRock board, 3 less SATA ports, and only 2 M.2. slots instead of the three that are present on the ASRock board.

How anyone could look at the X299 Professional and X299 Deluxe side-by-side and compare their technical specifications and price and think "yep, the ASUS is the best pick" is beyond me.

ASUS's "budget" motherboard, X299 Deluxe, is also poor. ASRock's X299 Taichi in the same price class again stomps it with more features -- dual LAN, more SATA ports, and more M.2. ports and it still costs less than ASUS's board even with all those extra features...

I am not impressed with any of these remaining ASUS boards on the QVL list.

Honestly, the rest are even more embarassing than the first two on the QVL list; they all cost $400+ and offer fewer features than ASRock's $150 cheaper X299 Taichi motherboard.

The Asus Rampage VI Extreme is particularly embarassing. It's ASUS's only 10 Gbps motherboard, and it's $300 more expensive than ASRock's 10 Gbps motherboard and it also STILL has fewer SATA ports, Ethernet ports, and M.2. slots than the ASRock motherboard to boot!

So I guess what I'm saying is: please consider add ASRock motherboards to your list of motherboards you test on. Thank you.
post #2 of 3
I'm not a member of this forum, just seen your post in the feed, but feel there's a couple of points I could put in here for you to think about.

I think one point you may be missing, is the amount of features on a board, doesn't necessarily allude to it being "better". In fact, in most instances the opposite is the case, as it goes into the category of "more to go wrong". smile.gif It'll be like the Hi-Fi buffs who pay much more for Hi-Fi's with far LESS components, but heavily over-engineered, so there is less noise and less chance of failure. So a better engineered motherboard with fewer features to go wrong, and drawing less power, may actually be better than one with all the bells and whistles.

I don't know what ASRock are like now, but I know years ago they were REALLY poor boards with frequent failures. That was a long time ago right enough, and from what I read here, they have upped their game a LOT in more recent years. But that could be another reason for ASRock to be overlooked.

Anyway, I've no experience with any of these boards, I just wanted to put out the point of view that more features does not equal "a better board". There are other factors at play too. smile.gif
post #3 of 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by VictoriaZ View Post

I am evaluating a X299 build, but I noticed that SL does not pick the best X299 motherboards for its testing. I don't understand why, when we are paying top dollar for the best CPUs, you wouldn't also select the best motherboard to go with it?

Example:

X299-Deluxe is on the QVL list, but it's a prime example of a rip-off motherboard. It's $100 more expensive than a ASRock Fatal1ty X299 Professional Gaming i9, yet it has less features! No 10 Gbps Ethernet like on the ASRock board, 3 less SATA ports, and only 2 M.2. slots instead of the three that are present on the ASRock board.

How anyone could look at the X299 Professional and X299 Deluxe side-by-side and compare their technical specifications and price and think "yep, the ASUS is the best pick" is beyond me.

ASUS's "budget" motherboard, X299 Deluxe, is also poor. ASRock's X299 Taichi in the same price class again stomps it with more features -- dual LAN, more SATA ports, and more M.2. ports and it still costs less than ASUS's board even with all those extra features...

I am not impressed with any of these remaining ASUS boards on the QVL list.

Honestly, the rest are even more embarassing than the first two on the QVL list; they all cost $400+ and offer fewer features than ASRock's $150 cheaper X299 Taichi motherboard.

The Asus Rampage VI Extreme is particularly embarassing. It's ASUS's only 10 Gbps motherboard, and it's $300 more expensive than ASRock's 10 Gbps motherboard and it also STILL has fewer SATA ports, Ethernet ports, and M.2. slots than the ASRock motherboard to boot!

So I guess what I'm saying is: please consider add ASRock motherboards to your list of motherboards you test on. Thank you.

Our QVL is a work in progress. It will be much more robust in the coming months.

As far as X299 is concerned, at launch I bought MSI, Gigabyte, Asus, and ASRock motherboards. Very quickly I learned a minimum of an 8 + 4 pin CPU connector was almost required for heavy AVX512 workloads on 7900Xs, this ruled out most of Asrock's lineup at the time. MSI motherboards did not have a functional AVX512 offset (I'm not sure if this was ever fixed or not), Gigabyte motherboards had major phantom throttling issues, and issues maintaining a manual Vcore across different workloads (SSE->AVX512). Asus was the only one where everything functioned as expected by default, and had 8 + 4 pin power connectors on most if not all of their boards.

If a component you'd like to use isn't on our QVL, it doesn't necessarily mean it won't work. It's just something that we haven't validated yet. It just might not be as plug and play.
Edited by Silicon Lottery - 9/26/17 at 6:29pm
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