Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Someone explain please.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Someone explain please. - Page 7

post #61 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
The clock that computers use is a square(ish) wave form. It is a pulse of electricity that stays on for a time and off... on/off... over and over at a set interval. One full on or off period is a cycle. This is how all components in the computer synchronize. Double Data Rate memory does TWO things within this one pulse or cycle. Quad pump does FOUR things in this one cycle.
I told you to think of waves

There isn't really a simpler way of explaining frequency and quad pumping / double pumping, since your getting down into all the technical stuff.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gonX View Post
You got DDR2 wrong... DDR = Double Data Rate. The DDR2 is simply just because it's using another technology.
And yeah i know, i just just thought the 2 would be a good way to remember it. Didn't think it would be too confusing, but i see now that it could be confusing.
post #62 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
I need to know what L2 cache is, what the FSB is and why its different from the other speed mentioned (3.2ghz...)
L2 cache is a small amount of memory used in a processor to store data that is yet to be processed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
well then what is ram for? what makes it different then the ram built in the processors?
Main system RAM is used to store larger amounts of data ready to be accessed by the CPU as and when required. RAM is used as it accesses data much faster than most static devices like hard discs and optical drives.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
In the other question... when you look at processors for sale it will say "
E6320 1.86ghz. 1066fsb"
Why does it mentions two different speeds? what does each represent?
In this case, 1.86Ghz is the clock speed of the processor and 1066 is the suported system bus speed. Clock speed is to do with how fast the processor executes data while bus speed is how fast data can travel around the motherboard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
ok , so far this is what I got. Fsb is the speed in which the the processor sends data to anything in the system(ram,graphics card)... Correct?
Correct.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
Cache is built in memory,like ram, which is how much it can process at one time. correct?
No, wrong. As I said, cache is a form of temporary storage that processors use as most modern processors can actually process data faster than the bus of the motherboard can retrieve new data from the RAM.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
What is the ghz speed referring to for the processor?
This is refering to the amount of clock cycles in the processor. Different processors execute different amounts of instructions in each clock cycle. In theory, the more clock cycles a processor has, the better.
post #63 of 76
Thread Starter 
so doing 4 things in one cycle at 266.5mhz each, equals your bus speed of the processor.
now the ram is two per cycle at 400mhz each.
NOW, in the 4 and 2 things that they do a 1066mhz processor sends data 266mhz faster then the 800mhz ram can send data to the processor.

The graphics cards work the same way as ram with sending two at 800mhz if the memory clock is 1600mhz.
What exactly are the 2 and the 4 called, I want to know the name rather then just 2 and 4 lol.

also, what is the difference in ddr, ddr2, ddr3? are they just spolit into categories depending on speed?

Another also, what other bus's are there other then fsb. what do they do?
PC
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
PD @ 3.0ghz Asrock G31m-s R2.0 Ati radeon 1900xt Crucial 2gb dual channel 
Hard DrivePowerCase
320gb 7200rpm, seagates 530 watt Hyper ATX mid-tower 
  hide details  
Reply
PC
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
PD @ 3.0ghz Asrock G31m-s R2.0 Ati radeon 1900xt Crucial 2gb dual channel 
Hard DrivePowerCase
320gb 7200rpm, seagates 530 watt Hyper ATX mid-tower 
  hide details  
Reply
post #64 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
What does ram do if the processor has it built in?
RAM is a form of storage for programs and/or data that needs to be accessed. For example, when you start a game data is loaded from the HDD to the RAM and then past onto the CPU as and when to be executed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
What does the ram speed refer to? how fast it stores the info? Is it the same as a 7200rpm hardrive?
Erm no, it is nothing like a 7200RPM HDD. HDD's are one of the only mechanicle components used in modern computer systems and cannot read or write data as fast as RAM can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
so theres no difference in pc5400 and pc6400?
PC5400 means that it can access data at 5.4Gb per second, PC6400 6.4Gb per second. These equate to 677Mhz and 800Mhz resepctively.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
im not seeing the connection... how is 667mhz and 800mhz compared like inches and centimeters? there both mhz, neither is smaller an dthey dont equal each other.?.?.?
Forget about inches and centimetres, they cannot be compared to electrical signals.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
800mhz ram is no better then 667mhz ram because?????? Explain in common detail please.
It means that it can access and forward data to the CPU faster.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
more data per second sent to what?
The processor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
ok, so 1gb ram stick can temporarily store 1gb of memory, loaded from the harddrive which will then be sent to the processor as a speed of 800 mhz. correct?
now what all loads from the harddrive to the ram at boot up?
The operateing system and programs. Fancy computer hardware is useless without software to tell the components what to do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
ok, one more question and now that i understand all of the other stuff, this shouldnt take long.
What is the memory for in graphics cards, what is stored in them. what does the core clock and the memory clock do?
You could think of a graphics card as a mini computer system with its own internal bus, processor and memory. It operates in exactly the same way as any other computer system bar the fact that it operates alongside the main CPU via communication through the MCH.
post #65 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
so doing 4 things in one cycle at 266.5mhz each, equals your bus speed of the processor.
now the ram is two per cycle at 400mhz each.
NOW, in the 4 and 2 things that they do a 1066mhz processor sends data 266mhz faster then the 800mhz ram can send data to the processor.

The graphics cards work the same way as ram with sending two at 800mhz if the memory clock is 1600mhz.
What exactly are the 2 and the 4 called, I want to know the name rather then just 2 and 4 lol.

also, what is the difference in ddr, ddr2, ddr3? are they just spolit into categories depending on speed?

Another also, what other bus's are there other then fsb. what do they do?
1066 FSB would be effectively 266.5 and 800 RAM would be effectively 400. The ram would be running faster than the FSB, not the other way around.
The 4 pertaining to FSB is called quad pumped, and it is what intel uses.
the 2 pertaining to the RAM is from the Double Rate Data, DDR. I shoulda been clearer on my earlier post about DDR2, the DDR is what makes it double, not the 2.

DDR DDR2 DDR3 are just different technologies.

DDR3 is going to have increased frequencies and thus higher bandwidth than DDR2, but at the cost of higher latencies.
And i think i twas the same deal with DDR2 and DDR, although i was never into PCs around the time of DDR so i'm not 100% sure on DDR2 vs DDR.

Not sure about buses, i'm not that technical. And about GFX cards, they don't work the exact same way as a your CPU RAM and FSB... Not to keen on exactly how GFX cards work when it comes down to the way the parts interact.
post #66 of 76
Thread Starter 
so the 800mhz ddr2 is sending data to the processer faster then the 1066mhz processor is sending data to the ram. Is the data first stored in the cache, then sent to the ram? what is it sending and receiveing in terms of quad pumped and double data rate?
PC
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
PD @ 3.0ghz Asrock G31m-s R2.0 Ati radeon 1900xt Crucial 2gb dual channel 
Hard DrivePowerCase
320gb 7200rpm, seagates 530 watt Hyper ATX mid-tower 
  hide details  
Reply
PC
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
PD @ 3.0ghz Asrock G31m-s R2.0 Ati radeon 1900xt Crucial 2gb dual channel 
Hard DrivePowerCase
320gb 7200rpm, seagates 530 watt Hyper ATX mid-tower 
  hide details  
Reply
post #67 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
I lied, one more question to.........
When overclocking a processor, you up the fsb which makes the processor receive the data faster. this in return makes the processor itself speed up while processing the extra data? or is the processor speed another option to raise in bios?
Depending on the BIOS, it will either allow you to overclock the main system bus, or the internal CPU bus. Seeing as raiseing one automatically raises the other anyway, motherboard manufacturers don't givean option to change both.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
ok, one quick refresh..... fsb is the speed of data being transfered to anything from the cpu?
Yes, you've already asked this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
if thats correct, how would it make a difference in speeds of the ram and cpu if you increasing the speed of transfered data to them and not from?
Raiseing the system bus will aaffect all devices attached to that bus if you do not unlink them by adding a divider or by setting a permanent value for them to operate by.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
So if you have a processor with 1066fsb and your ram is 800mhz. That means your processor can send data at 1066mhz but your ram can only respond it 800mhz. therefore your ram is slowing down your processor?
1066FSB is refering to the speed that data travels through the motherboard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
quad pumped meaning that it is sending and receiving data from 4 different areas?
No. Quad pumped means that the system bus is operateing at four times the speed of the internal CPU bus.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
so each has data transfer rate of 266.5mhz to and from the ram, the pci slots, theharddrive,and the graphics card.
No, PCI devices, drives and graphics cards all operate via their own respective bus that is linked to the main system bus but doesn't necessarily transfer data as fast.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
So in return , the ram can send data at 800mhz but the processor can only respond it at 266.5 mhz. This doesnt seem right.
That's why processors have cache.
post #68 of 76
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper
So in return , the ram can send data at 800mhz but the processor can only respond it at 266.5 mhz. This doesnt seem right.

That's why processors have cache.





That doesnt make sence. Someone said that the ram operates at double 400mhz and the processor send data at quad 266.5 mhz. So when i said that the processer send at 266 and the ram sends at 800, i was wrong.
So in the cache, what data is stored in there??? data waiting to go to the ram, data that has already been processed and waiting to go to the ram(like a build up)???
PC
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
PD @ 3.0ghz Asrock G31m-s R2.0 Ati radeon 1900xt Crucial 2gb dual channel 
Hard DrivePowerCase
320gb 7200rpm, seagates 530 watt Hyper ATX mid-tower 
  hide details  
Reply
PC
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
PD @ 3.0ghz Asrock G31m-s R2.0 Ati radeon 1900xt Crucial 2gb dual channel 
Hard DrivePowerCase
320gb 7200rpm, seagates 530 watt Hyper ATX mid-tower 
  hide details  
Reply
post #69 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by brherper View Post
So in the cache, what data is stored in there??? data waiting to go to the ram, data that has already been processed and waiting to go to the ram(like a build up)???
The cache on a processor stores data that has been received by the processor from the RAM, but hasn't been executed by the processor yet. Once the data being executed in the processor is finished, the data in the cache moves into the CPU and more data is then stored from the RAM into the cache ready to be processed.
post #70 of 76
The cache is just really fast ram located in the CPU.

Code and stuff that is used very often by the processor is kept there, also information from the RAM.

Similar to keeping a formula chart right next to while solving physics equations, instead of opening your text book everytime to look up the formulas.

To quote you use the quote button bellow every post

And you were right that the processor effectively sends at 266.6MHz through the FSB, but the RAM's effective speed is 400MHz, not 800MHz
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel CPUs
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Someone explain please.