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Intel Penryn Information Thread

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 
Penryn is not an entirely new processor, it does use some of the architectural concept of Merom. While Intel said that Penryn will come with some (architecture) enhancements such as increased L2 cache size(always good) as well as Streaming SIMD4 (SSE4) extensions to speed up media applications, the other change relates to an increased clock speed and some thermal improvements. Which for people like us who overclock I guess that means overclocks will be super high! 410 million transistors and 6 MB L2 cache in the 45 nm Penryn processor core
On the surface, the 45 nm process allowed Intel to cut the space requirement of transistors roughly in half. A dual-core Penryn processor holds 410 million transistors, up from 293 million in Merom/Conroe/Woodcrest. Since Intel did not double the transistor count, it found additional space available on the (original Merom) die, which the company used to increase the L2 cache (on Penryn). While specifications were not revealed, sources told TG Daily that Penryn will integrate 6 MB L2 cache, up from 4 MB today.
A quad-core Penryn processor, which will be available in desktop and server flavors, will carry 820 million transistors, about half the transistor count of the current Itanium 2 processor with Montecito core. However, this is about 20 times the number of the transistors used in the first Pentium 4 processor with Willamette core, which was released as a 180 nm chip in 2000 (with 42 million transistors).
Intel will not counter AMD's approach to create a native, single-chip quad-core processor and continue to produce the quad-core Penryn in a dual-die, multi-chip package instead. Intel representatives told us that the company sees little reason to transition to a single-die solution at this time, as its current multi-chip approach with Kentsfield and Clovertown is successful and is achieving high yields. Using a multi-die solution, Intel is able to be more selective about the dies for quad-cores. Single-die quad-cores are not expected to arrive until the introduction of the Nehalem core, which will succeed Penryn with a completely new 45 nm architecture in the second half of 2008.

They will all be based off the new 45nm technology and implement high-k and metal materials inside the new high performance transistors.

This is what the 45nm transistor technology is capable of according to Intel:
  • Approximately twice the transistor density (great for smaller chip sizes or increased transistor counts)
  • Approximately 30 percent reduction in transistor-switching power
  • Greater than 20 percent improvement in transistor-switching speed or a greater than 5 times reduction in source-drain leakage power
  • Greater than 10 times reduction in transistor gate oxide leakage for lower power requirements and increased battery life
Release of the Penryn
In the second half of 2007, Intel will begin production of the next generation Intel® Core™2 processor family codenamed "Penryn" which is based on latest 45 nm microarchitecture enhancements. With the tremendous success of the revolutionary microarchitecture (currently used in both the Intel® Xeon® and Intel® Core™2 processor families) it marks the next step in Intel's rapid cadence for delivering a new process technology with an enhanced microarchitecture or an entirely new microarchitecture every year. Which is great for those who have the money to upgrade CPUs every year or so.




Intel's 45nm Manufacturing
Intel's is currently developing its 45nm process on 300mm wafers in Hillsboro, Oregon, in D1D, a fab with clean-room space equivalent to 3.5 football fields! Two new 300mm fabs are being built for the coming 45nm ramp: Fab 32 in Ocotillo, Arizona (production due to start in the second half of 2007) and Fab 28 in Israel (production to start in the first half of 2008).

Motherboards Supporting 45nm Penryn CPU

Currently there are no motherboards that can support the Penryn

popping up on the web since May 21, Sean Maloney's Computex keynote today marks the official launch of Intel's new entries in the Series 3 Chipset family (codenamed "Bearlake"): the P35 and the G33. Today, we'll take a short look at both the P35 and G33 chipsets. Of the two, the P35 is set to replace the P965 (and, to a certain extent, the 975X) in the high end of the market, while the G33 replaces the 945G in the value segment. Later in the year, we'll see the X38 and G35 products, which will be the top-end replacements for the 975X and G965 products in the very high-end and mainstream consumer segments, respectively.


The three most immediate advantages the Series 3 Chipset family brings to the table are its support for Intel's upcoming 1333MHz FSB, DDR3 support, and Turbo Memory. In the longer term, Series 3 also provides an upgrade path to Penryn—Intel's upcoming 45nm processor.
The block diagram of the P35 shown below gives a good summary of its features. The diagram only illustrates a single x16 PCIe 1.0 channel, so like its predecessor the P35 supports Crossfire in an x16 MCH + x4 ICH setup. Those who want better dual-GPU support should wait for the higher-end X38 to come out in the third quarter of this year.

The Intel P35 Chipset
As was mentioned above, the P35 supports both DDR2 and DDR3 at speeds of up to 1066 or 1333MHz, respectively, and can host everything from existing Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad processors to the next-generation Penryn processors. The total number of USB 2.0 ports is up to 12 (up from 10 on the P965), and the P35 also supports Vista's ReadyBoost technology via the use of what Intel calls Turbo Memory. Intel Turbo Memory can either use a PCIe x1 slot or can take the form of a NAND flash chip soldered directly on to the motherboard. Although not specifically defined in the block diagram, the implication of Intel's chipset presentation is that Intel's Fast Memory Access (formerly defined as a separate feature for the P965 chipset) has been folded into the P35.
The P35 also uses Intel's new ICH9 hub, which provides support for the afore-mentioned Turbo Memory. The number of total SATA devices supported compared to the ICH8 is still six, but ICH9 also provides native support for eSATA devices.
Although the P35 doesn't technically replace the 975X chipset, it'd be surprising if the older 975X maintains much traction against Intel's latest release. Not only does the P35 offer support for faster memory and newer processors, the ICH9 southbridge has several significant advantages over the 975X's ICH7. Expect to see a wide range of P35 boards bracketing both the high-end and mid-range motherboard market until the unveiling of Intel's X38 chipset later this year.
The other major chipset unveiled today is the more mainstream-oriented G33 with an integrated graphics processor (IGP), shown below:

The Intel G33 Chipset
The P35 and G33 share virtually all the same features, but the G33 supports a larger array of display-out technologies and includes support for Intel's X3100 video display. The major difference between the two is the age of the motherboard standard they're replacing: Intel's P965 is quite a bit newer than the two-year-old 945G standard. Based on Intel's chipset positioning guidelines, the G33 is something of a stopgap measure, aimed at holding down the fort until the introduction of the G35 later this year. The G35's IGP will feature full DirectX 10 support, so those who're planning on Vista upgrades should wait for it.

More Intel Technical Specs

Anyway, let's come back to Penryn processors based on the Core micro architecture: according to the official statement of Intel's representatives, the company is currently offering five products of earlier steppings aimed at various sectors of the market- over 15 chips planned for the forthcoming release following the 45-nm process technology. According to the company's statements, Penryn chips are already under trial runs in systems powered by Windows Vista, Mac OS X, Windows XP, and Linux.
As per the practical experience (or maybe the tradition?) acquired during the release of first chips of the Core micro architecture, the Penryn family will include desktop and mobile PCs, workstations and corporate systems.
We'll be considering the technology changes that touched upon the manufacturing process and materials used later, but for now let's list the innovations implemented in the Penryn processors. Among them is the increased number of transistors – over 410 mln for the dual-core design (291 mln transistors in 65-nm dual-core Conroe) and over 820 mln for the quad-core Yorkfield, with the chip area reduced to 110 mm2 (from 143 mm2 in Conroe). That's where we see preservation of the Moore's Law according to which the quantity of transistors is doubled once every two years, with the unit cost of manufacture per single transistor going down and the performance going up, and in the near future - I am sure - we can ascertain the doubling of CPU cores on a chip, why not?
Along with that, the Penryn family of CPUs will support for up to 50 new Intel SSE4 instructions aimed at the increase of capabilities and performance of handling the multimedia content. In this regard, it is interesting to note that support for a number of new SSE instructions was announced still for Conroe processors, however at IDF Fall 2006 the support for SSE4 was reserved for the next generation of micro architecture, Nehalem. As is stated in the press release, Penryn will support for the new Intel SSE4 instruction set.
Among the new chips there will be versions of L2 cache size up to 12 MB, and in general the whole family will differ in increased performance and advanced capabilities of controlling the power consumption modes. As to the power consumption of new 45-nm Core 2 Duo, Core 2 Extreme, Core 2 Quad, and Xeon processors based on the Penryn core, it is already known that the TDP will be approximately matching to today's realities – about 35 W in chips for notebooks, about 65 W in the mainstream chips for desktop PCs, about 80 W in 4-core server processors and chips for extreme gamers, under increased performance.



Under Construction-Just doing this for anyone interested

Credit Given
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/2007/0...enryn_details/
http://www.intel.com/technology/sili...technology.htm
http://www.digital-daily.com/cpu/intel_penryn
    
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post #2 of 37
You should also add what chipsets/mobos they are supposed to work with and such...
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post #3 of 37
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the reply I will do that give me some time I am excited about this thread hope all enjoy!!!
    
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post #4 of 37
So the production starts in the second half of 2007, meaning we could see these chips in Q3 2007?

Thanks for the info so far!
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post #5 of 37
Still waiting on seeing some more Santa Rosa laptops Hopfully the new macbook pros come out soon, my computer is dieing on me. It will be celebrating its 2nd birthday soon
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post #6 of 37
Since the Penryn won't be a native Quad Core, is it even worth waiting/paying for when the Q6600 can be bought for $266? Chances are, the Penryn will be pretty expensive for the first few weeks.
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post #7 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Arter View Post
Single-die quad-cores are not expected to arrive until the introduction of the Nehalem core, which will succeed Penryn with a completely new 45 nm architecture in the second half of 2008
Good info there REP+

But does this mean that Nehalem will or wont work with current socket 775 [P35] boards that support penryn, it seems as though whenever you want to upgrade theres always something else knew to put you off again.
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post #8 of 37
Thread Starter 
going to do a info thread on that next glad you brought that chip up.
    
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post #9 of 37
Thread Starter 
Just updated the thread if theres anyone interested
    
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post #10 of 37
This might be a dumb thing to ask but is there any chance that those new chips e6x50 series with higher fsb are actually gonna be the penryns everyone is raging about. i think of this because they didnt make a native quadcore and that just sounds like intel is just stalin' with updates to current conroe's
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