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New AMD line gonna beat Intel's? - Page 2

post #11 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertRat View Post
AMD's new CPU that might(most likely will at least performance wise) isn't coming out for awhile andd will use a socket differnt from thier current socket, AM2.
Maybe I read this wrong but this quote is directly from AMD's website.

"With the true quad-core design offered by the upcoming AMD Phenom processors, cores communicate on the die rather than through a front side bus external to the processor – a bottleneck inherent in other products that are packaging two dual-core chips to form quad-core processors. Additionally, AMD’s Direct Connect Architecture on-chip ensures that all four cores have optimum access to the integrated memory controller and integrated HyperTransport links, so that performance scales well with the number of cores. This design is also highlighted by a unique shared L3 cache for quicker data access and Socket AM2 and Socket AM2+ infrastructure compatibility to enable a seamless upgrade path."

Link to the page is Click Me

So to my understanding there will be AM2 compatability or the new socket will be backwards compatable with AM2... which I am not entirely sure...
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post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by DisillusionedMorals View Post
Maybe I read this wrong but this quote is directly from AMD's website.

"With the true quad-core design offered by the upcoming AMD Phenom processors, cores communicate on the die rather than through a front side bus external to the processor – a bottleneck inherent in other products that are packaging two dual-core chips to form quad-core processors. Additionally, AMD’s Direct Connect Architecture on-chip ensures that all four cores have optimum access to the integrated memory controller and integrated HyperTransport links, so that performance scales well with the number of cores. This design is also highlighted by a unique shared L3 cache for quicker data access and Socket AM2 and Socket AM2+ infrastructure compatibility to enable a seamless upgrade path."

Link to the page is Click Me

So to my understanding there will be AM2 compatability or the new socket will be backwards compatable with AM2... which I am not entirely sure...
wow! thx. I stand corrected. I'm glad they found a way to do that. that's gonan be awesome..


and sry about the "multi"-core thing. multi, as in multiple could mean any CPU w/ >/= 2 cores. but i think you are thinking of the 80-core prototype they showed off recently... and that won't be coming for awhile... however knowing intel they will stick 2 penryn's on a wafer, lol; so there ya go, 8 core CPU.
post #13 of 31
The point I amde in response to your first question was yes - K10 will be better than Intel's current dual and quad cores. However Intel have a new line of cores coming out next year built on a 45nm platform as opposed to the current 65nm. These may end up being better than AMD's upcoming K10, but we dont know yet

On AM2, AM2+. The first Phenom X2/4's will be AM2+ native, but will work in AM2 mobo's just fine. the only real difference between AM2 and AM2+ is that AM2+ allows you to adjust voltages and clocks for individual cores - AM2 will only let you adjust the chip as a whole
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post #14 of 31
im pretty sure penryn is just a die shrink of kentsfield with some added SSE instructions witch means it will still be 2 physicall dual core dies on a PCB
post #15 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bitemarks and bloodstains View Post
im pretty sure penryn is just a die shrink of kentsfield with some added SSE instructions witch means it will still be 2 physicall dual core dies on a PCB


I thought for sure that penryn was native quad/ II believe intel was makign a big deal outa taht point, i'll see if i can find my own
post #16 of 31
Penryn is essentially a shrink of the Core 2 Duo chips, with a few extras like the SSE4 instructions. It's being introduced along with the new manufacturing technology, the "tick" of Intel's plans. Then next year, when the 45-nanometer manufacturing technology is mature, Intel will introduce a new chip microarchitecture code-named Nehalem--the "tock"--with more significant changes to the chip design. from news.com
post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bitemarks and bloodstains View Post
Penryn is essentially a shrink of the Core 2 Duo chips, with a few extras like the SSE4 instructions. It's being introduced along with the new manufacturing technology, the "tick" of Intel's plans. Then next year, when the 45-nanometer manufacturing technology is mature, Intel will introduce a new chip microarchitecture code-named Nehalem--the "tock"--with more significant changes to the chip design. from news.com
Well that I did not know, thanks
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post #18 of 31
Penryn
The successor to the Merom core currently used for the Core 2 Duo T5000/T7000 series mobile processors, code-named Penryn, will debut the 45 nanometer process that will also be used for the Conroe sequel, Wolfdale (see below). Many details about Penryn appeared at the April 2007 Intel Developer Forum. Its successor is expected to be Nehalem.

Important advances[27] include the addition of new instructions (including SSE4, also known as Penryn New Instructions) and new fabrication materials (most significantly a hafnium-based dielectric).

Penryn is intended to be paired with a new chipset, Bearlake[28], which will include an increase in bus speed (connection to the northbridge, etc.) for certain models to 1333 MT/s and will include support for DDR3 SDRAM; Intel believes [29] that DDR3 is particularly useful in the power- and heat-constrained environments within mobile equipment.

Penryn will also be released in a quad-core version for desktop replacement notebooks.


[edit] Wolfdale and Yorkfield
Wolfdale will be the desktop version of Penryn, with two cores sharing 6 MiB of L2 cache and 1333 MHz FSB. Two Wolfdale dies on a single module will make up a Yorkfield chip, the successor to the Kentsfield processor.[30]. Each die will share 6 MiB L2 cache, for a total of 12 MiB, and this chip will also have a 1333 MHz FSB. These processors are expected to become available in late 2007 or early 2008, and the platform will support DDR3. At the Intel Developer Forum 2007 a Yorkfield cpu was compared with a Kentsfield cpu. [31][32]

Demo Yorkfield spotted: Stock at 3.33GHz




Got it off of wiki, yea, i'm sry, u appear to be correct.
post #19 of 31
huh, so the Yorkfield isnt even a native Quad? AMD might well perform better than even that, especially since they will be looking at AM3 by then
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post #20 of 31
the first native quad from intel will be nehalem which will be a completely new architecture containing a on die memory controllor like AMD
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