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RAID configurations?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Okay, I was looking around inside the case modding where I came across a topic that I read a while back when I was building a computer for my father. RAID configurations is what I came across. The manual of the motherboard gave explanations of each of the RAID configurations, but I do not really understand it, so I am hoping someone could explain it to me simpler and more understandable. It seems like a very interesting feature though, so if anyone can help a beginner like me, I would be very happy.
post #2 of 8
There are about 5 different types of RAID configuration, each with it's own unique features and benefits.

RAID0 (Most common amongst enthusiasts) - Stripes data across 2 or more identical hard drives, essentially doubling the throughput of the hard drive array. In addition, you get the amount of storage space of BOTH hard drives combined.

RAID1 (Common among servers/databases) - Mirrors data of one hard drive to another identical hard drive. If one HDD dies, you can instantly restore your data from the other hard drive. However, you only get the amount of storage space of ONE hard drive.

RAID0+1 (Uncommon) - Uses a system of striping on two hard drives and mirroring on another two hard drives. Striped data from hard drives A and B is mirrored to hard drives C and D, so data can be restored if A or B fail. Unfortunately, the benefit of RAID0 is negated by the sluggishness of RAID1's mirroring. In addition, this setup requires FOUR identical HDD's, which can be very costly.

RAID5 - Uses a 3 disk minimum with disturbed parity. Data is striped across all disks as well as a parity section on each. If one disk fails, the array is damaged, but order can be restored.

RAID10 - Provides fault tolerance and improved performance but increases complexity. Array continues to operate with one or more failed drives. RAID10 creates a striped set from a series of mirrored drives.

Hope it helps!
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post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidwolf909 View Post
There are about 5 different types of RAID configuration, each with it's own unique features and benefits.

RAID0 (Most common amongst enthusiasts) - Stripes data across 2 or more identical hard drives, essentially doubling the throughput of the hard drive array. In addition, you get the amount of storage space of BOTH hard drives combined.

RAID1 (Common among servers/databases) - Mirrors data of one hard drive to another identical hard drive. If one HDD dies, you can instantly restore your data from the other hard drive. However, you only get the amount of storage space of ONE hard drive.

RAID0+1 (Uncommon) - Uses a system of striping on two hard drives and mirroring on another two hard drives. Striped data from hard drives A and B is mirrored to hard drives C and D, so data can be restored if A or B fail. Unfortunately, the benefit of RAID0 is negated by the sluggishness of RAID1's mirroring. In addition, this setup requires FOUR identical HDD's, which can be very costly.

RAID5 - Uses a 3 disk minimum with disturbed parity. Data is striped across all disks as well as a parity section on each. If one disk fails, the array is damaged, but order can be restored.

RAID10 - Provides fault tolerance and improved performance but increases complexity. Array continues to operate with one or more failed drives. RAID10 creates a striped set from a series of mirrored drives.

Hope it helps!
There are definitely more than just 5 RAID types. There are literally dozens... like RAID 3 or 050. Those are just the common ones.

Diagrams: http://www.acnc.com/04_01_00.html
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post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
There are definitely more than just 5 RAID types. There are literally dozens... like RAID 3 or 050. Those are just the common ones.

Diagrams: http://www.acnc.com/04_01_00.html
Sorry Duckie, I only listed configurations that I've ever seen/heard of being used.

@OP - All configurations are diagrammed at the above website.
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post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Very nicely explained. You reworded in English for me. LOL I could not understand what the hell that manual was telling me until now. That site with the chart was helpful too.

You both got to me everything I wanted to know.
But one more thing, for "identical drives", would it matter if one is in PATA and other is in SATA but the same model?

Though still not that quite sure, but if I would want to have like a back up, so if one my my disks is dead, I would like it to have a back up, and I also like it to have a stripping, so that it can run doubling the throughput as well. Which raid can do all this? Of course, I am thinking about the failing. Like in RAID 0, if one drive fails, all the data is gone, so that does not sound nice.
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiKaRux3 View Post
Very nicely explained. You reworded in English for me. LOL I could not understand what the hell that manual was telling me until now. That site with the chart was helpful too.

You both got to me everything I wanted to know.
But one more thing, for "identical drives", would it matter if one is in PATA and other is in SATA but the same model?

Though still not that quite sure, but if I would want to have like a back up, so if one my my disks is dead, I would like it to have a back up, and I also like it to have a stripping, so that it can run doubling the throughput as well. Which raid can do all this? Of course, I am thinking about the failing. Like in RAID 0, if one drive fails, all the data is gone, so that does not sound nice.
If your RAID controller supports it, then you can do RAID with SATA and PATA/IDE HDs. Check your documentation.

For both striping and mirror, you need to run RAID0+1 or RAID10. However, you will need four hard drives. It would be better to get two large HDs in RAID1 to store your documents and files. Then use two smaller HDs in RAID0 just for the OS and applications.
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post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
If your RAID controller supports it, then you can do RAID with SATA and PATA/IDE HDs. Check your documentation.

For both striping and mirror, you need to run RAID0+1 or RAID10. However, you will need four hard drives. It would be better to get two large HDs in RAID1 to store your documents and files. Then use two smaller HDs in RAID0 just for the OS and applications.
Agreed. And yes you can utilize one RAID array on the IDE Bus and one on the SATA Bus (or more than one on each bus if your board supports it), HOWEVER, you cannot create an array that has one HDD on an IDE bus and the other on the SATA bus. BOTH drives must be on the same bus.

And I agree with Duckie, stripe two smaller drives together for applications and OS, then use a single large drive, or two drives in RAID1 to store data.
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Sandy Beach
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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Okay, I see thanks a lot.
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