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My case pictures – need serious help! - Page 4

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by linskingdom View Post
I totally mess up the side panel. I was trying to use metal hole saw and powerful 3/8” drill from Black and Decker to cut a hole on the side panel. However, the material is so thick and I could not get through it after broke 3 drill bits. Any idea how to fix this mess? Go to some stores to have them cut it?
Well... if you have a friend that has a fabrication shop, or if you are willing to pay the money a machine shop could repair it for you.

Could you post a pict of the "messed up" case panel? You might be able to salvage it, but we would have to see what you are working with.

Also when you are cutting metal you will need some lubrication. Using "3-in-1" oil works well, but the process is messy.... so being outside is pretty much mandatory unless you want the woman (Mother, Wife, GF - or all 3) in your life pitching an enormous fit...

Flux
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Flux
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C300 (OS), Velociraptor (storage) Lite-On W7 64-bit Pro Samsung 275T 
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post #32 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Syrillian View Post
Well... if you have a friend that has a fabrication shop, or if you are willing to pay the money a machine shop could repair it for you.

Could you post a pict of the "messed up" case panel? You might be able to salvage it, but we would have to see what you are working with.

Also when you are cutting metal you will need some lubrication. Using "3-in-1" oil works well, but the process is messy.... so being outside is pretty much mandatory unless you want the woman (Mother, Wife, GF - or all 3) in your life pitching an enormous fit...

It is very bad. You may lol on this.

post #33 of 34
Ya know...it's not that bad...

You're essentially 25% of the way around the circumference.

you stated that you broke bits. Is it safe to say that the dearly departed were the pilot-hole bits (center)? erm... I guess it would have to be.

If so, it is due to excessive lateral pressure .

If you have some C-clamps and a work table you could use some plywood and 2x4's to brace the panel whilst accounting for the punch-through. Being able to brace the work without having to use your hands or feet will allow you to focus on the cut, and not worry about the panel that is being cut.

Once you have the work fully secured (the panel is held securely in place by itself), start with the hole saw again. I think that you must have been standing on the left-side (orientation of pict) and the cut was forming from the 12 o'clock postion to the 3 o'clock position. That is the nature of the torque and the inclination that the holesaw will tend toward (for right-handed peeps).... but I am speculating.

The object is to keep the teeth of the blade in uniform contact as it travels around the area that you are cutting. This may require you to tilt the drill and the bit to the left by a degree or so...

If you do try to salvage the panel yourself, use some oil to lubricate the contact surfaces. Take your time, and stop periodically. Drilling these types of holes can be fatiguing and your grip and steadyness will falter.... that's generally when the the blade will disengage and skip. Additionally the drill will need to cool off a little so that you do not burn it out.

...or you could take it to a machine shop. They should be able to whip it out in no time at all.

okay... I'll shut up now..
Flux
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 2600K GA-P67A-UD7 GTX 580 2 x 2GB Corsair 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
C300 (OS), Velociraptor (storage) Lite-On W7 64-bit Pro Samsung 275T 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Black Widow Ult. Silverstone DA750 Lian Li T60 R.A.T. 7 
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Q-Pad 
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Reply
Flux
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 2600K GA-P67A-UD7 GTX 580 2 x 2GB Corsair 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
C300 (OS), Velociraptor (storage) Lite-On W7 64-bit Pro Samsung 275T 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Black Widow Ult. Silverstone DA750 Lian Li T60 R.A.T. 7 
Mouse Pad
Q-Pad 
  hide details  
Reply
post #34 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Syrillian View Post
Ya know...it's not that bad...

You're essentially 25% of the way around the circumference.

you stated that you broke bits. Is it safe to say that the dearly departed were the pilot-hole bits (center)? erm... I guess it would have to be.

If so, it is due to excessive lateral pressure .

If you have some C-clamps and a work table you could use some plywood and 2x4's to brace the panel whilst accounting for the punch-through. Being able to brace the work without having to use your hands or feet will allow you to focus on the cut, and not worry about the panel that is being cut.

Once you have the work fully secured (the panel is held securely in place by itself), start with the hole saw again. I think that you must have been standing on the left-side (orientation of pict) and the cut was forming from the 12 o'clock postion to the 3 o'clock position. That is the nature of the torque and the inclination that the holesaw will tend toward (for right-handed peeps).... but I am speculating.

The object is to keep the teeth of the blade in uniform contact as it travels around the area that you are cutting. This may require you to tilt the drill and the bit to the left by a degree or so...

If you do try to salvage the panel yourself, use some oil to lubricate the contact surfaces. Take your time, and stop periodically. Drilling these types of holes can be fatiguing and your grip and steadyness will falter.... that's generally when the the blade will disengage and skip. Additionally the drill will need to cool off a little so that you do not burn it out.

...or you could take it to a machine shop. They should be able to whip it out in no time at all.

okay... I'll shut up now..

Thanks. I will give a try this weekend.
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