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H2 Burn in your RAM - Page 2

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
As in a link that explains burn in? I haven't seen an explanation anywhere that was backed by evidence.

The explanation that I've heard (but no hard evidence for it) is that all the current running the IC 'widens out' the path that the current takes, effectively reducing resistance and getting it to run faster and cooler because of the resistance decrease.
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post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by LC_STiK View Post
The explanation that I've heard (but no hard evidence for it) is that all the current running the IC 'widens out' the path that the current takes, effectively reducing resistance and getting it to run faster and cooler because of the resistance decrease.
Now, that's just silly. The worst/best current can do is knock a few electrons out of place (electron migration), and cause a cut in the circuit.

Yeah, am after an explanation into 'burn in'. Why it works, what it actually does on the silicon level.
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Just to let you know, I'm nowhere near an expert in electronics.

The other main thing I've heard is that the constant electricity going through the transistors in an IC conditions them.

People have had conflicting opinions on this though. Some people do burn ins at a high voltage to condition the transistors to accepting high voltages while a lot of people do burn ins at the lowest possible voltage to reduce heat and electricity instead of increase performance.
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post #14 of 15
My best explination would be a common sence approach...

what are transistors...?

Basically a on/off switch right?

as the switch wears (under use) it gets better at the transistion from on to off or vise-versus...

as long as you wear them in...in the correct maner they function better than the brand new tight ones.. when they are erroring it's like you're getting switch flutter where it's not sure if it should be on or off...?

thats just my assumtion...but I could be wrong...

you know kinda like a brand new car...the motor will only make so much power or accelerate so fast when new and tight... get some miles on it and it loosens up a bit and makes more power and goes faster yet...

but it's like if you drive it like you are going to church everyday it wont have as much power as if you drove it more aggresively while breaking it in...

I do know this for a fact because I build engines and break them in...
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post #15 of 15
Now, I can believe a transistor being affected by a 'burn in', but at the moment, I don't know too much about the innards of a transistor.
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