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Side Panel Fan Direction

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
In my case i have a 120mm front intake fan, a 120mm rear exhaust fan that is aligned with my zalman 9700 nt (the zalman is blowing out to the exhaust fan). I have a slot for an 80mm fan on my clear side panel directly over the zalman...do I want to make that fan intake or exhaust? thanks all!
post #2 of 17
had this problem with my Scythe FCS-50. i found i'd get a couple degrees cooler with it sucking in than out. but since yours is aimed at the top of the heatsink and not directly in front of the heatsink fan i'm not sure what the effect would be.

best bet would be to record temps over the course of a week with it set one way and visa-versa and see what works.
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post #3 of 17
Exhaust , intake will cause turbulence in the case.
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post #4 of 17
Intake usually works better for side fans for me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiagnosisDirt View Post
Exhaust , intake will cause turbulence in the case.
How would taking air out be any less disruptive to airflow? Please explain because fan flow is important to me.
    
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post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
i was thinking intake would cause turbulence because it would be blowing directly onto the stream of air that the zalman is blowing towards the 120mm fan and out of the case...

im going to try exhaust and see what happens
post #6 of 17
Intake has always worked best for me, although it does add to sucking in more dust and dirt, my front fan has a filter....It does not disrupt the airflow...it adds to the stream...
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post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by redsox83381 View Post
Intake usually works better for side fans for me.


How would taking air out be any less disruptive to airflow? Please explain because fan flow is important to me.
In my case , the antec 900 , I mounted an 80mm fan to the mesh on my panel. When I had it setup as an intake it pretty much ruined the flow of air from front to back but when it was set up as an exhaust it didn't disturb the airflow and still cooled my 7800. Everyones system has a different optimal airflow design , case & parts all have different drag so try it each way , Just record the temp and find your sweet spot.
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post #8 of 17
When it comes to air cooling, it's often best to test ideas yourself because there are so many inter-dependent factors that have to work together. In my experience, it's really the only way to prove theories. Often, changing one parameter influences everything else in the system. In biology, it's called symbiosis.

Here's an example. There are basically three philosophies when it comes to air cooling and air volume moving through the case: 1) More CFM on intake (to generate positive pressure); 2) More CFM on exhaust (to generate negative pressure); and 3) Equal CFM on both exhaust and intake. Philosophy 3 is usually touted as ideal, but honestly, it's almost impossible to do this, in my opinion. So really you have to choose between generating more positive pressure (more intake, less exhaust) or generating more negative pressure (more exhaust, less intake).

My gaming rig is in a Silverstone TJ09 (just so we know what we're working with); it has mounting points for four fans: 1 definitely for intake down in front (the middle, actually, as it breathes through gills in the sides), an exhaust fan mounted in the back and high up, and two additional mounting points above the motherboard chamber. All fan mounts are for 120mm fans.

I spent weeks searching for the optimum setup for the fans. The only fan I didn't change is the bottom intake fan; I played with all possible combinations with the three other fans. I tried the rear fan as an intake and upper two fans as exhaust; rear fan as exhaust, both upper fans as intake; rear fan as exhaust, either one of the upper two fans as intake with the other as exhaust. I tried all possible combinations. In the end, my temperature data and some visual aerodynamic cues (with incense smoke and, at higher airflow and pressure levels, strips of plastic taped in strategic places), I found that the best temperatures for everything in my system (not just the CPU, but for the chipsets and graphics cards too) resulted from generating negative pressure.

I'm not suggesting that negative pressure is the best solution for you. But the lesson here is: Don't make any assumptions. Test everything you can. The best answers are the ones you find yourself with your own equipment.

It's time-consuming and detailed work, sure. But at least you can trust your own work.

Good luck! And hope this (really long post) helps!
    
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post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by txtmstrjoe View Post
When it comes to air cooling, it's often best to test ideas yourself because there are so many inter-dependent factors that have to work together. In my experience, it's really the only way to prove theories. Often, changing one parameter influences everything else in the system. In biology, it's called symbiosis.

Here's an example. There are basically three philosophies when it comes to air cooling and air volume moving through the case: 1) More CFM on intake (to generate positive pressure); 2) More CFM on exhaust (to generate negative pressure); and 3) Equal CFM on both exhaust and intake. Philosophy 3 is usually touted as ideal, but honestly, it's almost impossible to do this, in my opinion. So really you have to choose between generating more positive pressure (more intake, less exhaust) or generating more negative pressure (more exhaust, less intake).

My gaming rig is in a Silverstone TJ09 (just so we know what we're working with); it has mounting points for four fans: 1 definitely for intake down in front (the middle, actually, as it breathes through gills in the sides), an exhaust fan mounted in the back and high up, and two additional mounting points above the motherboard chamber. All fan mounts are for 120mm fans.

I spent weeks searching for the optimum setup for the fans. The only fan I didn't change is the bottom intake fan; I played with all possible combinations with the three other fans. I tried the rear fan as an intake and upper two fans as exhaust; rear fan as exhaust, both upper fans as intake; rear fan as exhaust, either one of the upper two fans as intake with the other as exhaust. I tried all possible combinations. In the end, my temperature data and some visual aerodynamic cues (with incense smoke and, at higher airflow and pressure levels, strips of plastic taped in strategic places), I found that the best temperatures for everything in my system (not just the CPU, but for the chipsets and graphics cards too) resulted from generating negative pressure.

I'm not suggesting that negative pressure is the best solution for you. But the lesson here is: Don't make any assumptions. Test everything you can. The best answers are the ones you find yourself with your own equipment.

It's time-consuming and detailed work, sure. But at least you can trust your own work.

Good luck! And hope this (really long post) helps!
I have the same case TJ09 and which pattern you ended up with?

I'm thinking Rear fan exhaust 2 intake?
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post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by txtmstrjoe View Post
When it comes to air cooling, it's often best to test ideas yourself because there are so many inter-dependent factors that have to work together. In my experience, it's really the only way to prove theories. Often, changing one parameter influences everything else in the system. In biology, it's called symbiosis.

Here's an example. There are basically three philosophies when it comes to air cooling and air volume moving through the case: 1) More CFM on intake (to generate positive pressure); 2) More CFM on exhaust (to generate negative pressure); and 3) Equal CFM on both exhaust and intake. Philosophy 3 is usually touted as ideal, but honestly, it's almost impossible to do this, in my opinion. So really you have to choose between generating more positive pressure (more intake, less exhaust) or generating more negative pressure (more exhaust, less intake).

My gaming rig is in a Silverstone TJ09 (just so we know what we're working with); it has mounting points for four fans: 1 definitely for intake down in front (the middle, actually, as it breathes through gills in the sides), an exhaust fan mounted in the back and high up, and two additional mounting points above the motherboard chamber. All fan mounts are for 120mm fans.

I spent weeks searching for the optimum setup for the fans. The only fan I didn't change is the bottom intake fan; I played with all possible combinations with the three other fans. I tried the rear fan as an intake and upper two fans as exhaust; rear fan as exhaust, both upper fans as intake; rear fan as exhaust, either one of the upper two fans as intake with the other as exhaust. I tried all possible combinations. In the end, my temperature data and some visual aerodynamic cues (with incense smoke and, at higher airflow and pressure levels, strips of plastic taped in strategic places), I found that the best temperatures for everything in my system (not just the CPU, but for the chipsets and graphics cards too) resulted from generating negative pressure.

I'm not suggesting that negative pressure is the best solution for you. But the lesson here is: Don't make any assumptions. Test everything you can. The best answers are the ones you find yourself with your own equipment.

It's time-consuming and detailed work, sure. But at least you can trust your own work.

Good luck! And hope this (really long post) helps!
wow, thanks for the detailed response, reps for you
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