Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Monitors and Displays › What Hd Really Means
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What Hd Really Means - Page 4

post #31 of 44
Don't forget your HD-DVD player too
Jaguar
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel E6850 - 3.6Ghz Gigabyte P45-UD3R 8800GT 512MB OC 4GB OCZ Platinum 6400 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
WD AAKS 640GB + 500GB Storage Pioneer DVD-RW SATA Windows 7 Professional x64 22" Viewsonic VX2255 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech Cordless Antec EarthWatts 500W Coolermaster Elite 330 Black Logitech Optical Cordless 
  hide details  
Reply
Jaguar
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel E6850 - 3.6Ghz Gigabyte P45-UD3R 8800GT 512MB OC 4GB OCZ Platinum 6400 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
WD AAKS 640GB + 500GB Storage Pioneer DVD-RW SATA Windows 7 Professional x64 22" Viewsonic VX2255 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech Cordless Antec EarthWatts 500W Coolermaster Elite 330 Black Logitech Optical Cordless 
  hide details  
Reply
post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by snaynay View Post
HD TVs and Monitors are different. Although computer monitors can have a better res than a TV makes them 'HD' but they can't run exactly at TV's HD standards, such as 720i/p or 1080i/p. What makes the difference as well is the 'i' or the 'p'. 'i' meaning interlaced or 'p' meaning 'progressive'. These are different methods of scanning and a tv can use progressive which is smoother and other stuff.... Personally, i'd rather monitors...
Oh and HDMI is identical to DVI except hdmi transmits sound as well (so cheap way round gettin a HD for PS3/XBOX users!)

Finally, a while back, i was told HD tvs is actually an old technology that was released in america years and years ago (long before the UK)...dunno if thats true?
Flaws in your arguement:
1) There is no 720i.
2) Computer monitors and video cards have always been progressive scan.
Once again...
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 [4.28GHz, HT] Asus P6T + Broadcom NetXtreme II VisionTek HD5850 [900/1200] + Galaxy GT240 2x4GB G.Skill Ripjaw X [1632 MHz] 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
Intel X25-M 160GB + 3xRAID0 500GB 7200.12 Window 7 Pro 64 Acer H243H + Samsung 226BW XARMOR-U9BL  
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Antec Truepower New 750W Li Lian PC-V2100 [10x120mm fans] Logitech G9 X-Trac Pro 
  hide details  
Reply
Once again...
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 [4.28GHz, HT] Asus P6T + Broadcom NetXtreme II VisionTek HD5850 [900/1200] + Galaxy GT240 2x4GB G.Skill Ripjaw X [1632 MHz] 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
Intel X25-M 160GB + 3xRAID0 500GB 7200.12 Window 7 Pro 64 Acer H243H + Samsung 226BW XARMOR-U9BL  
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Antec Truepower New 750W Li Lian PC-V2100 [10x120mm fans] Logitech G9 X-Trac Pro 
  hide details  
Reply
post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
Flaws in your arguement:
1) There is no 720i.
2) Computer monitors and video cards have always been progressive scan.
Flaws in your argument....

Computer Monitors and Video Cards were at one point an interlaced signal just as standard NTSC is interlaced. This was very common untill you started seeing monitors larger than 14" CRT's on the market. It took more VRAM and processing power for a video card to produce a progressive image at higher resolutions at the time i.e. anything above say 800x600. And as such in most cases a monitor would display 800x600 non-interlaced (as it was called back then) or 1024x768 interlaced. Mind you this was all the way up through mid to late 90's.

Also just to clarify a few other mis-statements in this thread. Any resolution above 1024x768 is considered HD, not 1366x768. Though more commonly than not 1280x720 (720P) is considered the first true step in HD while resolutions between 1280x720 and 740x480 are considered ED (enhanced definition) and anything 740x480 and lower is considered SD.

Also someone commented on 1080P being 30 progressive frames per second its actually 60 progressive frames per second. Otherwise you'd still be seeing an interlaced image on any current consumer display as all modern displays are fixed 60hz refresh except for the few newer 120hz displays that are hitting the market.
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Criswell View Post
Any monitor 17" or above that can display at least 1280 x 720 will be capable of playing HD content at 720p. You will need a standard monitor of 24" or at least a screen resolution of 1920 x 1200 to display 1080p Content.

Monitors that are 1680 x 1050, usually 20" to 22", and in some cases 19" cannot display the full resolution of 1080p content, even though people think that it's only the last number that counts (1050) thinking it's only 30 pixels off, but what most don't realize is that that horizontal number of pixels is 1920.
Yes, it's closer to 200,000 pixels off, if I remember right. Don't feel like redoing the math.
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeremyFr View Post
Flaws in your argument....

Computer Monitors and Video Cards were at one point an interlaced signal just as standard NTSC is interlaced. This was very common untill you started seeing monitors larger than 14" CRT's on the market. It took more VRAM and processing power for a video card to produce a progressive image at higher resolutions at the time i.e. anything above say 800x600. And as such in most cases a monitor would display 800x600 non-interlaced (as it was called back then) or 1024x768 interlaced. Mind you this was all the way up through mid to late 90's.

Also just to clarify a few other mis-statements in this thread. Any resolution above 1024x768 is considered HD, not 1366x768. Though more commonly than not 1280x720 (720P) is considered the first true step in HD while resolutions between 1280x720 and 740x480 are considered ED (enhanced definition) and anything 740x480 and lower is considered SD.

Also someone commented on 1080P being 30 progressive frames per second its actually 60 progressive frames per second. Otherwise you'd still be seeing an interlaced image on any current consumer display as all modern displays are fixed 60hz refresh except for the few newer 120hz displays that are hitting the market.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interlace
Quote:
By the mid-1980s computers had outgrown these video systems and needed better displays. The Apple IIgs suffered from the use of the old scanning method, with the highest display resolution being 640x200, resulting in a severely distorted tall narrow pixel shape, making the display of realistic proportioned images difficult. Solutions from various companies varied widely. Because PC monitor signals did not need to be broadcast, they could consume far more than the 6, 7 and 8 MHz of bandwidth that NTSC and PAL signals were confined to. Apple built a custom 342p display into the Macintosh, and EGA for IBM compatible PCs was 350p. The Commodore Amiga created a true interlaced NTSC signal (as well as RGB variations). This ability resulted in the Amiga dominating the video production field until the mid 1990s, but the interlaced display mode caused flicker problems for more traditional PC applications where single-pixel detail is required. 1987 saw the introduction of VGA, which PCs soon standardized on, Apple only followed suit some years later with the Mac when the VGA standard was improved to match Apple's proprietary 24 bit colour video standard also introduced in 1987.

In the early 1990s, monitor and graphics card manufacturers introduced newer high resolution standards that once again included interlace. These monitors ran at very high refresh rates, intending that this would alleviate flicker problems. Such monitors proved very unpopular. While flicker was not obvious on them at first, eyestrain and lack of focus nevertheless became a serious problem. The industry quickly abandoned this practice, and for the rest of the decade all monitors included the assurance that their stated resolutions were "non-interlace". This experience is why the PC industry today remains against interlace in HDTV, and lobbied for the 720p standard.
So since the late 1980's, PC have been progressive/non-interlace except for a brief period in the early 90's. I stand corrected then....

2) Computer monitors and video cards have been progressive scan for only the 12 years.
Once again...
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 [4.28GHz, HT] Asus P6T + Broadcom NetXtreme II VisionTek HD5850 [900/1200] + Galaxy GT240 2x4GB G.Skill Ripjaw X [1632 MHz] 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
Intel X25-M 160GB + 3xRAID0 500GB 7200.12 Window 7 Pro 64 Acer H243H + Samsung 226BW XARMOR-U9BL  
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Antec Truepower New 750W Li Lian PC-V2100 [10x120mm fans] Logitech G9 X-Trac Pro 
  hide details  
Reply
Once again...
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 [4.28GHz, HT] Asus P6T + Broadcom NetXtreme II VisionTek HD5850 [900/1200] + Galaxy GT240 2x4GB G.Skill Ripjaw X [1632 MHz] 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
Intel X25-M 160GB + 3xRAID0 500GB 7200.12 Window 7 Pro 64 Acer H243H + Samsung 226BW XARMOR-U9BL  
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Antec Truepower New 750W Li Lian PC-V2100 [10x120mm fans] Logitech G9 X-Trac Pro 
  hide details  
Reply
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by extrinsicdin View Post
Chris G
I KNOW THIS AS A FACT LIKE THE SKY IS BLUE
The sky is not blue.
Black Box 3
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsHard Drive
i7 920 4GHz 1.248 VCore Gig EX58-UD3R 5870 2x160GB Hitachi RAID 0, 500GB WD 
Optical DriveOSPowerCase
ASUS DRW-2014L1T Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit SilverStone Zeus 850w Antec 902 
  hide details  
Reply
Black Box 3
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsHard Drive
i7 920 4GHz 1.248 VCore Gig EX58-UD3R 5870 2x160GB Hitachi RAID 0, 500GB WD 
Optical DriveOSPowerCase
ASUS DRW-2014L1T Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit SilverStone Zeus 850w Antec 902 
  hide details  
Reply
post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interlace


So since the late 1980's, PC have been progressive/non-interlace except for a brief period in the early 90's. I stand corrected then....

2) Computer monitors and video cards have been progressive scan for only the 12 years.

Hehe I just wish I could forget those horrid days but try as I may the flicker is permanantly imprinted in my memory. I can actually say that an old trick to see if a monitor was running interlaced or not back then, was to hum at just the right frequency (which really wasn't hard to do) once you hit the right frequency you could see the monitor refreshing, hehe it was pretty funny but then again highly annoying to cuz if you coughed or cleared your throat it'd do the same thing alot of times.
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeremyFr View Post
Flaws in your argument....
Also just to clarify a few other mis-statements in this thread. Any resolution above 1024x768 is considered HD, not 1366x768. Though more commonly than not 1280x720 (720P) is considered the first true step in HD while resolutions between 1280x720 and 740x480 are considered ED (enhanced definition) and anything 740x480 and lower is considered SD.
Yikes ED! Don't they sell a pill for that? LOL

Quick question though. I have a 1080i HDTV and a 20' monitor at 1400x1050 resolution. Where as I can clearly see text on my monitor, on my HDTV the text is tiny and indistinct. Why is that?
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by APOLLOSTEES View Post
Yikes ED! Don't they sell a pill for that? LOL

Quick question though. I have a 1080i HDTV and a 20' monitor at 1400x1050 resolution. Where as I can clearly see text on my monitor, on my HDTV the text is tiny and indistinct. Why is that?
The tiny part is due to the viewable size and viewing distance difference.
The indistinct issue is due to the above plus the fact that it is interlaced.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interlace
Once again...
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 [4.28GHz, HT] Asus P6T + Broadcom NetXtreme II VisionTek HD5850 [900/1200] + Galaxy GT240 2x4GB G.Skill Ripjaw X [1632 MHz] 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
Intel X25-M 160GB + 3xRAID0 500GB 7200.12 Window 7 Pro 64 Acer H243H + Samsung 226BW XARMOR-U9BL  
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Antec Truepower New 750W Li Lian PC-V2100 [10x120mm fans] Logitech G9 X-Trac Pro 
  hide details  
Reply
Once again...
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 [4.28GHz, HT] Asus P6T + Broadcom NetXtreme II VisionTek HD5850 [900/1200] + Galaxy GT240 2x4GB G.Skill Ripjaw X [1632 MHz] 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
Intel X25-M 160GB + 3xRAID0 500GB 7200.12 Window 7 Pro 64 Acer H243H + Samsung 226BW XARMOR-U9BL  
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Antec Truepower New 750W Li Lian PC-V2100 [10x120mm fans] Logitech G9 X-Trac Pro 
  hide details  
Reply
post #40 of 44
Wow, so many misconceptions about HDTV. It is much simpler than aspect ratio and pixels etc. They simply go by lines and interlaced/progressive, that is it. 480 lines, 720 lines, 1080 lines, interlaced or progressive. Done.

Sure there are pixels from left->right on the TVs, but it isn't really discussed because the standard doesn't allow for adjustment.

What is comes down to is monitors are not HDTV, most monitors support at least 8-10 resolutions, some of which are HDTV standard resolutions. The only case I can think of where an HDTV monitor can beat out a computer monitor is 1920x1080, which is higher res than some monitors, like my 1680x1050.
Foldatron
(17 items)
 
Mat
(10 items)
 
Work iMac
(9 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
i7 950 EVGA x58 3-way SLI EVGA GTX 660ti GTX 275 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
3x2GB Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 80GB Intel X25-M SSD 2TB WD Black 150GB WD Raptor 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
2x 150GB WD V-raptor in RAID0 Win7 Home 64-bit OEM 55" LED 120hz 1080p Vizio MS Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 
PowerCase
750W PC P&C Silencer CoolerMaster 690 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i5 2500S AMD 6770M 8GB (2x4GB) at 1333Mhz 1TB, 7200 rpm 
Optical DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
LG 8X Dual-Layer "SuperDrive" OS X Lion 27" iMac screen Mac wireless keyboard 
Mouse
Mac wireless mouse 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
i7-2600K AMD 6970M 1GB 16GB PC3-10600 DDR3 1TB 7200rpm 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
256GB SSD 8x DL "SuperDrive" OS X 10.7 Lion 27" 2560x1440 iMac display 
Monitor
27" Apple thunderbolt display 
  hide details  
Reply
Foldatron
(17 items)
 
Mat
(10 items)
 
Work iMac
(9 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
i7 950 EVGA x58 3-way SLI EVGA GTX 660ti GTX 275 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
3x2GB Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 80GB Intel X25-M SSD 2TB WD Black 150GB WD Raptor 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
2x 150GB WD V-raptor in RAID0 Win7 Home 64-bit OEM 55" LED 120hz 1080p Vizio MS Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 
PowerCase
750W PC P&C Silencer CoolerMaster 690 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i5 2500S AMD 6770M 8GB (2x4GB) at 1333Mhz 1TB, 7200 rpm 
Optical DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
LG 8X Dual-Layer "SuperDrive" OS X Lion 27" iMac screen Mac wireless keyboard 
Mouse
Mac wireless mouse 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
i7-2600K AMD 6970M 1GB 16GB PC3-10600 DDR3 1TB 7200rpm 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
256GB SSD 8x DL "SuperDrive" OS X 10.7 Lion 27" 2560x1440 iMac display 
Monitor
27" Apple thunderbolt display 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Monitors and Displays
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Monitors and Displays › What Hd Really Means