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Maximum possible clock speed (predictable) - Page 2

post #11 of 23
Wow!
Human brain is like a 168,0000 MHz Pentium
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post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 
Agreed, BUT fiber-optics connections have a large latency, so it will result in a very fast "thinking" of the CPU with a unsynchronised clock to the chipset and RAM, so my guess would be that they'll use vacuum pipes that don't slow down the light, or electricity, which also moves through vacuum with the speed of light.
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post #13 of 23
Thats possible, although since we are talking about TB and PB speeds, we will most likey have a better solution. Not to mention I believe that "Light-processors" would work better as a truely 3D proc instead of simulated 3D.
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post #14 of 23
Actually, eventually they'll stop using binary logic gates at all. Once the technical requirements of superposition are worked out (we're nowhere close on an industrial scale), we can have quantum scale logic gates that have three, rather than two, states. Not only does that vastly reduce the scale, it also makes clock operations work at the third power rather than the second. (IE - 8 bits of data can each be 0,1,or 2 rather than the binary 0,1 - information transfer is [number of bits]^3 rather than [number of bits]^2.

Whee, quantum computing is fun to think about.
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post #15 of 23
Actually a Company in Canada "claims" to already have a quantum computer. Althought it would still be in very early test stages.
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post #16 of 23
wow !!!!!!!! smells like burning batteries in here ....keep going boys i dont really know what ur talking about but it makes me feel a bit smarter just by reading it !!!
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post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schroedinger View Post
Actually, eventually they'll stop using binary logic gates at all. Once the technical requirements of superposition are worked out (we're nowhere close on an industrial scale), we can have quantum scale logic gates that have three, rather than two, states. Not only does that vastly reduce the scale, it also makes clock operations work at the third power rather than the second. (IE - 8 bits of data can each be 0,1,or 2 rather than the binary 0,1 - information transfer is [number of bits]^3 rather than [number of bits]^2.

Whee, quantum computing is fun to think about.
Ironic.... Schroedinger posting about superposition. I guess your avatar is of the famous Schroedinger's Cat?


Electrons have mass.... therefore they cannot move at the speed of light.

The speed of electrons does NOT mean the speed of data transfer. An individual electron is not used for data (currently). Therefore, the speed of the electromagnetic wave of data throught copper is what you want to know. From what I can find... it is 1/3c to 2/3c.
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post #18 of 23
"Canadian startup company D-Wave demonstrated a 16-qubit quantum computer. The computer solved a sudoku puzzle and other pattern matching problems. The company claims it will produce practical systems by 2008. Skeptics believe practical quantum computers are still decades away, that the system D-Wave has created isn't scaleable, and that many of the claims on D-Wave's Web site are simply impossible (or at least impossible to know for certain given our understanding of quantum mechanics).

If functional quantum computers can be built, they will be valuable in factoring large numbers, and therefore extremely useful for decoding and encoding secret information. If one were to be built today, no information on the Internet would be safe. Our current methods of encryption are simple compared to the complicated methods possible in quantum computers. Quantum computers could also be used to search large databases in a fraction of the time that it would take a conventional computer. Other applications could include using quantum computers to study quantum mechanics, or even to design other quantum computers. "


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post #19 of 23
Yeah, I've seen the DWave stuff before, but my gut tells me they haven't got half of what they say they do. One of the problems with quantum computing is the fragility of the states; it isn't like a transistor turning on and off, it is significantly more vulnerable than an electronic system to interference and data loss. Which means what happens in the lab is one thing, a commercial or industrial application is another.

I don't doubt they can make a lab system that can perform basic functions, but I don't believe for an instant anyone can manufacture anything that works yet.

Encryption is child's play because a quantum system can brute force solve the whole durn internet in a few minutes. Welcome to exponential increases in data throughput per bit.
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post #20 of 23
just as a kind of side related question but could you maybe use a binary based hard drive/ram to store quantum information still or would it all be very different to do any of this.

I don't know much (well anything really) about it but I figured it might be a possibity at a high space and speed expense
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