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[Answered] Hibernate to overclock? - Page 4

post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by archangelabove View Post
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post #32 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by archangelabove View Post
No. When your computer goes into Hibernation, it saves where you were to the HDD.

When you then "power on", your computer does not go through a BOOT sequence. It does not POST, and you will not be able to access BIOS.

When you hibernate, your OS just kills everything and says to the computer "Hey, when you wake up, come straight to me, skip everything else."


It is completely different from Restarting the computer.

Unless you have a way of accessing BIOS while youre in your OS, this can't be done. And you can't access your BIOS from your OS.
Forgive me for not reading anything below this reply before replying, but...

I know hibernation saves where you are onto the hdd. That's exactly what I said.

Yes it does post, and yes I can access BIOS. I've done it about 115 times in the past 48 hours while reading guides to see what it's talking about (without making changes, but changes can be made, and I have made them on accident, but it didn't cause a single problems)

I know it's completely different from restarting the computer. I wasn't asking about Hibernation. I was asking if people use Hibernation to save time when they are overclocking...
post #33 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by archangelabove View Post
No idea what your Overclock not being able to standby is about.

By all means, please test your theory guys.

Go into Hibernate and see if you can access BIOS.

Then let us know
I'm letting you know.
post #34 of 39
Thread Starter 
It's too bad I was overclocking... I could've said what Hibernation really is from the beginning. But here are my thoughts that I typed up... lol oh well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JEK3 View Post
I'm not sure I agree with the above posts. Hibernate completely shuts down your computer. Also, I can hibernate Windows, start back up it Ubuntu, shut down, then come back up in Windows exactly where I left off.
I think there's nothing to agree or disagree on. That's like saying, "I'm not sure I agree that a glass will break if you throw it onto a slab of cement."

Quote:
Originally Posted by dragosmp View Post
For one I use it since always (win millenium, 2000, XP, Vista) and it works very well.

Hibernation turns off the computer, it's 100% lights-out, just as shut down. The difference is that it writes the content of the RAM on the hyberfil.sys file (usually on c and when it boots up it reads the file, writes into RAM and you pick up where you left off.

I do it because it's dang frustrating to wait until is shuts down...30 sec, reboots...30 sec, loads win until you can actually click something...another minute. With hibernation the shutdown time is the same, only the startup tine is 20 sec or thereabouts, boot included.

Moreover, you can OC, change FSB, memory timings, voltages, remove/add disk drives (except the boot drive of course) remove/add USB stick, change CPUs as long as they are from the same family (ex. X2 with another X2).
One thing you CAN NOT DO: remove/add RAM. Since it writes the contents of the ram on the HDD, it expets on boot up to have the quantity of ram equal with the size of the hyberfile.sys file.

Cheers!
My man!! At least somebody knows what Hibernation is on here. I'm so surprised to see that people don't really know what it is! Maybe too many people are running Vista...
post #35 of 39
Thread Starter 
One thing I should mention here is that about 2 minutes ago, I figured I'd just try it. I ended up with the definitive answer to this question: "Can I Hibernate to save time when overclocking?" No, do not do this. While it is true that Hibernation does shut down the computer, and allows you to turn it back on and go into BIOS normally, I found that when I adjusted the FSB and resumed Windows, it couldn't completely resume without the bsod (yeah, the blue screen of death).

So, that is the answer to my question.
post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by TnB= Gir View Post
negative. The pc has to be completely shut off for the effects to take place.
I think hibernate (NOT standby) does, in fact, turn the computer off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 5CheeseLasagna View Post
Wow, so nobody uses hibernate huh?
In my experience, hibernate is very dangerous and unreliable. Multiple times on multiple computers, hibernate has corrupted things so bad that a reinstall was required.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
Hibernation does NOT completely turns off the computer. Hibernate your system... then unplug your PSU for a minute. See what happens when you try to resume from hiberatation.
Are you sure? I was under the impression that hibernate saves what's in the RAM to the HDD, turns the system completely off, POSTs when you turn it back on, loads the OS, then resumes state.
post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hundred Gunner View Post
Are you sure? I was under the impression that hibernate saves what's in the RAM to the HDD, turns the system completely off, POSTs when you turn it back on, loads the OS, then resumes state.
This is correct. Hibernate does power off the system.

Hibernate, unplug your PC, go make some food, come back, plug it in, and power on. Same result as if you never unplugged it.
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post #38 of 39
who ever said that hibernate does not turn the computer off is confusing it with standby.

Standby: Put the computer in a "sleep" keeping everything in the RAM. This process does not post, it goes straight to the OS because it never shuts down. Only good for short periods of time.

Hibernation: This is what the pagefile.sys is mostly fore. Hibernation saves everything that's on the ram to the HDD and then completely shuts down. This option is safe for long periods of time, and is not vulnerable to power loss once in hibernation.
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post #39 of 39
Thread Starter 
I no longer need this thread. Thank you to all who participated.
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