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Windows OEM versions?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
what does OEM mean? can i install it on other computers?

thanks!
post #2 of 18
OEM stands for Original Equipment Manufacturer.

Retail vs. OEM

The biggest difference between a retail and OEM product is how warranties are handled. Most retail products come with very well defined terms for service and support in case the product has any problems. OEM products on the other hand will generally have shorter warranties and limited support. The reason is that the OEM product is supposed to be sold as part of a package via a retailer.

As a user who is building a computer system or upgrading a computer system, the retail version may also be important. If you are unfamiliar with what is required to install the component into the computer system, the manufacturer instructions can be very useful as are any cables that you may not have.

OEM Software

Like hardware, software can also be purchased as OEM. OEM software is identical to the full retail versions of the software but it lacks any packaging. Typically this will be seen with software items such as operating systems and office suites. Unlike OEM hardware, there are more restrictions on what will allow the software to be sold by a retailer to a consumer.

When you can buy OEM software
OEM software is designed for system builders. It typically can only be purchased with a complete computer system or there must be some additional purchase of hardware to go along with the OEM software. Purchasing a small hardware item like a mouse qualifies although I think this rule has now been relaxed and you can just purchase the software.

Are OEM Products OK?

There should be no physical difference in a component if it is sold as OEM or in retail. The difference is the extras that are provided with the retail version. If the support is important to you then you need to purchase the full retail version.
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post #3 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaslew View Post
OEM stands for Original Equipment Manufacturer.

Retail vs. OEM

The biggest difference between a retail and OEM product is how warranties are handled. Most retail products come with very well defined terms for service and support in case the product has any problems. OEM products on the other hand will generally have shorter warranties and limited support. The reason is that the OEM product is supposed to be sold as part of a package via a retailer.

As a user who is building a computer system or upgrading a computer system, the retail version may also be important. If you are unfamiliar with what is required to install the component into the computer system, the manufacturer instructions can be very useful as are any cables that you may not have.

OEM Software

Like hardware, software can also be purchased as OEM. OEM software is identical to the full retail versions of the software but it lacks any packaging. Typically this will be seen with software items such as operating systems and office suites. Unlike OEM hardware, there are more restrictions on what will allow the software to be sold by a retailer to a consumer.

When you can buy OEM software
OEM software is designed for system builders. It typically can only be purchased with a complete computer system or there must be some additional purchase of hardware to go along with the OEM software. Purchasing a small hardware item like a mouse qualifies although I think this rule has now been relaxed and you can just purchase the software.

Are OEM Products OK?

There should be no physical difference in a component if it is sold as OEM or in retail. The difference is the extras that are provided with the retail version. If the support is important to you then you need to purchase the full retail version.
Unless your name is Mark Kyrnin, you should really cite your sources when completely plagiarizing other peoples work, or heck, at least link to the site where you copied the information. (http://compreviews.about.com/od/general/a/OEM.htm)
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post #4 of 18
Is that near Pennsyltucky?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Richenbals View Post
Unless your name is Mark Kyrnin, you should really cite your sources when completely plagiarizing other peoples work, or heck, at least link to the site where you copied the information. (http://compreviews.about.com/od/general/a/OEM.htm)
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post #5 of 18
Windows OEM keys are allowed to be activated on one machine (that is, the motherboard, as is defined by the license agreement) only. It's cheaper because once your board dies, you have to go out and buy a new key.

You may not, contrary to popular belief, call m$ up and say "I had to reformat; new key please?"

So if you buy an OEM key, you'll have to buy a new one if you ever plan on upgrading your motherboard. It's probably better to just buy retail, which can be activated on any computer (but only one install may be active at any given time.)

More information can be found here: http://www.overclock.net/windows/156...ification.html
post #6 of 18
so let me get this right
if you installed vista then formatted you hd you could not install vista again using the same copie.
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post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hundred Gunner View Post
Windows OEM keys are allowed to be activated on one machine (that is, the motherboard, as is defined by the license agreement) only. It's cheaper because once your board dies, you have to go out and buy a new key.

You may not, contrary to popular belief, call m$ up and say "I had to reformat; new key please?"

So if you buy an OEM key, you'll have to buy a new one if you ever plan on upgrading your motherboard. It's probably better to just buy retail, which can be activated on any computer (but only one install may be active at any given time.)

More information can be found here: http://www.overclock.net/windows/156...ification.html

thgftw
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post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by willbushby View Post
so let me get this right
if you installed vista then formatted you hd you could not install vista again using the same copie.
Here, I'll give you an example:

I buy XP Pro OEM.

I buy an Asus K8V SE Deluxe motherboard (and the rest of my computer components).

I install my windows with my OEM key on this computer.

2 months later, I decide to upgrade to a C2D system.

I buy a Gigabyte GA-P965-DS3 motherboard.

I may not use my OEM key on this new motherboard.

If I call m$ up and "just tell them" that I had a virus and now it's not letting me reactivate, and I get them to give me a key, I got something without paying for it, and that is illegal! That, in addition to breaking the EULA I signed when I hit F8 to install windows on my K8V SE Deluxe!

You see, that's how OEM works

It's cheaper for a reason, and that reason has nothing to do with including or not including a box.
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hundred Gunner View Post
Windows OEM keys are allowed to be activated on one machine (that is, the motherboard, as is defined by the license agreement) only. It's cheaper because once your board dies, you have to go out and buy a new key.

You may not, contrary to popular belief, call m$ up and say "I had to reformat; new key please?"

So if you buy an OEM key, you'll have to buy a new one if you ever plan on upgrading your motherboard. It's probably better to just buy retail, which can be activated on any computer (but only one install may be active at any given time.)

More information can be found here: http://www.overclock.net/windows/156...ification.html
I'm not 100%, but I have called up MS and gotten my OEM version of Vista 64bit a new key after I told them I had to RMA a motherboard. With no problems at all.


Seems like I was in the right(The below was copied from your link):

Rather than purchase completely new PCs, my organization performs in-place upgrades to the hardware on many of our computers. We often times only replace the motherboard, processor, and memory. Since the COA is still on the case and the OS is still installed on the hard drive, this computer is still licensed, right?
ANSWER. Generally, you may upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on your computer and maintain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software, with the exception of an upgrade or replacement of the motherboard. An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a "new personal computer." Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred from one computer to another. Therefore, if the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect then a new computer has been created, the original license expires, and a new full operating system license (not upgrade) is required. This is true even if the computer is covered under Software Assurance or other Volume License programs.
post #10 of 18
Sorry for topic change, but i assume that if you change your mobo with a oem version installed it wont let you install anymore right? I mean mobo is basically the control center of a pc ( Sort of ).
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