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[oxford] ‘Digital piracy’ may benefit companies - Page 3

post #21 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by VulcanDragon View Post
Absolute drivel. The seller is always harmed when someone steals their goods. If I want a Ferarri but can't afford one, I don't get to steal it and claim the seller wasn't harmed because I would never have actually bought one. Trying to argue that it's a digital asset and not a physical asset is just an attempt to justify the theft.
I don't condone piracy in any shape way or form, but how exactly is that the same thing? If you jack a ferrari, it's gone; the seller lost that particular item. If you pirate software, the crime you are committing is copyright infringement, NOT theft. You are making an unauthorized duplicate of someone else's hard work. You didn't steal any object, although intellectual property might have been stolen.
post #22 of 78
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hundred Gunner View Post
I don't condone piracy in any shape way or form, but how exactly is that the same thing? If you jack a ferrari, it's gone; the seller lost that particular item. If you pirate software, the crime you are committing is copyright infringement, NOT theft. You are making an unauthorized duplicate of someone else's hard work. You didn't steal any object, although intellectual property might have been stolen.
But that doesn't sound as dramatic.
post #23 of 78


I'm just looking for an excuse to use it.
    
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post #24 of 78
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Originally Posted by rx7speed View Post
nathris you get the point though I'm sure

myself eh I have used neither but photoediting isn't my thing.


Yea I get your point But I was seriously considering going into graphic design until I switched to programming, and I'll tell you that neither myself or any of my designer friends (some of which are actively employed) would even think of using Elements even for doodling.
    
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post #25 of 78
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Originally Posted by VulcanDragon View Post
Absolute drivel. The seller is always harmed when someone steals their goods. If I want a Ferarri but can't afford one, I don't get to steal it and claim the seller wasn't harmed because I would never have actually bought one. Trying to argue that it's a digital asset and not a physical asset is just an attempt to justify the theft.

But for the sake of argument, let's engage in her little economic model. When someone pirates, their entire incentive to purhase the software is gone. Maybe they would have saved up for that expensive copy of Photoshop if buying it was their only option. But if they easily pirate it instead, that potential sale is lost, and the company is definitely harmed. Why buy the cow when you can get the milk for free?

Now let's take it a step farther, a true economic picture: The previous scenario is probably not all that common, but it is common that people who want Photoshop might very well settle for Photoshop Elements, or one of the other sub-$100 consumer alternatives. But if they can get full Photoshop easily on the torrent sites, why bother with the inexpensive, but definitely affordable, consumer versions? Now companies, the market as a whole, most definitely is being harmed...sales are being lost by someone, if not necessarily the actual product being pirated.

So in this short, this lady is frickin retarded and should be chastised by her university for making such publicly embarassing comments. Shame.
^ sums up this whole thread,
FTW
    
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post #26 of 78
I don't think what she is saying applies to PC games, but I agree with her. I work at an office supply store, and I get students come in all the time looking for Photoshop CS3 for school. Many of them don't know that it costs $649. Then I tell them that we also have Elements for $149 (or $199?) and they say their teacher said that Elements wouldn't work for them. Most teachers tell their students to download the free 30 day trial from the Adobe website.

I was talking to guy who works at Adobe (living in the Silicon Valley a lot of these companies are based in and around here) and he said that it costs them more money for people to download the free trial off their website (for bandwidth reasons) than the money they lose from pirating, and that it would cost them even more money to try and stop the pirating. He said (unofficially) they don't care too much about students illegally downloading their software because most of their money comes from businesses. Like someone above said, the students learn with their software, and when they get a job at a business, the business buys their software because it is what most of their employees are familiar with. Businesses can't get away with piracy the same way some college student in a dorm room can, so they have to buy it.
post #27 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by sorrowfool View Post
I don't think what she is saying applies to PC games, but I agree with her. I work at an office supply store, and I get students come in all the time looking for Photoshop CS3 for school. Many of them don't know that it costs $649. Then I tell them that we also have Elements for $149 (or $199?) and they say their teacher said that Elements wouldn't work for them. Most teachers tell their students to download the free 30 day trial from the Adobe website.

I was talking to guy who works at Adobe (living in the Silicon Valley a lot of these companies are based in and around here) and he said that it costs them more money for people to download the free trial off their website (for bandwidth reasons) than the money they lose from pirating, and that it would cost them even more money to try and stop the pirating. He said (unofficially) they don't care too much about students illegally downloading their software because most of their money comes from businesses. Like someone above said, the students learn with their software, and when they get a job at a business, the business buys their software because it is what most of their employees are familiar with. Businesses can't get away with piracy the same way some college student in a dorm room can, so they have to buy it.
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post #28 of 78
Ill conceived comparison. Games last time I checked were not bought with volume licensing which most business software is. Theft is theft no matter what color lenses your wearing. If we are going to justify theft due to the word of mouth then we might as well justify murder as natural selection. And yes they are one in the same because they are both illegal. Quite frankly I used to feel for the less fortunate and try to justify a lack of financial means as an excuse for piracy but then again improvement of your financial situation out weighs the need to improve your software portfolio. I look at it this way. I expect and its well within my legal rights to expect to be paid for my time spent working. Why not coders? They are doing their job just as we are.
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post #29 of 78
The girl is working towards her PhD at Oxford university. That's plenty good enough for me to take her seriously.
post #30 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by VulcanDragon View Post
Absolute drivel. The seller is always harmed when someone steals their goods. If I want a Ferarri but can't afford one, I don't get to steal it and claim the seller wasn't harmed because I would never have actually bought one. Trying to argue that it's a digital asset and not a physical asset is just an attempt to justify the theft.

But for the sake of argument, let's engage in her little economic model. When someone pirates, their entire incentive to purhase the software is gone. Maybe they would have saved up for that expensive copy of Photoshop if buying it was their only option. But if they easily pirate it instead, that potential sale is lost, and the company is definitely harmed. Why buy the cow when you can get the milk for free?

Now let's take it a step farther, a true economic picture: The previous scenario is probably not all that common, but it is common that people who want Photoshop might very well settle for Photoshop Elements, or one of the other sub-$100 consumer alternatives. But if they can get full Photoshop easily on the torrent sites, why bother with the inexpensive, but definitely affordable, consumer versions? Now companies, the market as a whole, most definitely is being harmed...sales are being lost by someone, if not necessarily the actual product being pirated.

So in this short, this lady is frickin retarded and should be chastised by her university for making such publicly embarassing comments. Shame.
QFT
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