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[oxford] ‘Digital piracy’ may benefit companies - Page 5

post #41 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmo_9000 View Post
Thats a good point. Its hard to take someone seriously when they say they lost a sale of soemthing that didnt cost any money for them to make. ANd besides sharing is probably one of the best things that could happen to the actual bands. Its probably the fastest way to help new bands get their music out and get people to like and listen to them. They make their money on concerts anyways and radio stations anyway.
It costs money to make software, I don't know why people think it costs nothing. You have to pay the programmers to write it, artists to do the artwork etc. you have to give a cut to the publisher, you also have to pay for things like the media its put on, also you have to pay for things like packaging and advertisements.
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post #42 of 78
From the Wired article:
Quote:
THQ's Michael Fitch places the blame for the closure of Titan Quest developer Iron Lore Entertainment, squarely on the shoulders of game pirates, though he does suggest that they may have had a bit of help from dumb players, hardware vendors, and one particularly stupid reviewer.
So it wasn't that THQ didn't promote the game well enough, or that it was bad, or an action RPG in a market flooded with them, or buggy because they didn't play test it enough... it was a truly great game that that was maligned by one evil reviewer and driven into the ground by petty thieves and idiots that can't keep a PC running. Makes perfect sense.
post #43 of 78
Vulcan Dragon, your argument that someone 'may have saved up to buy that software' should really just go out the window, because we are talking about someone who would NEVER, EVER buy the software.

Monetarily speaking, if the companies sales+revenues are the same, it doesn't hurt them. Is it wrong? Yeah probably.
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post #44 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dman View Post
It costs money to make software, I don't know why people think it costs nothing. You have to pay the programmers to write it, artists to do the artwork etc. you have to give a cut to the publisher, you also have to pay for things like the media its put on, also you have to pay for things like packaging and advertisements.
I think the point was that it costs virtually nothing to make a digital copy of a piece of software. You could talk about hosting and Internet bandwidth charges, and the cost of the hardware to actually download from the Internet, but that's really clutching at straws, especially when it comes to P2P sharing.
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post #45 of 78
Personally, I can't think of any software I have pirated that I use regularly (ie. once a week)

Alot of people who download pirated software do so to do maybe just one or two tasks and then never use it from that point on. Also, if you need to do something regularly, there is, 9 times out of 10, an open source alternative.

I also sometimes use pirated software of software I already own. One example would be Sony Vegas movie studio. I have the disk, but have lost the serial code. Is it wrong for me to install it from the disk, and use a keygen and crack so that can use the product I paid good money for? I could phone up and ask for another key probably, but it's faster and easier for me to crack it in 10 minutes.

The problem with the issue of piracy is that its a very general statement, and does not cover individual circumstances. I'm sure several of you have legal copies of XP, yet run cracked copies simply because it is too inconvenient to install SP2 onto your XP SP1 install CD.

At the end of the day, the company has not lost any money as a result, but you are technically still engaging in piracy.

So as far as this subject goes, anyone who flat out states that piracy is either right or wrong, is a "retard" as one poster so ignorantly named the author of the article the thread refers to.
    
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post #46 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jewels View Post
I think the point was that it costs virtually nothing to make a digital copy of a piece of software. You could talk about hosting and Internet bandwidth charges, and the cost of the hardware to actually download from the Internet, but that's really clutching at straws, especially when it comes to P2P sharing.
That's not the argument they make though, many people downloading games off the net will often not buy the game when they would have otherwise done so.

It's an argument of consequence, cause and effect. The downloading of the game is the cause as they see it plainly.

I happen to agree with them completely. It's just common sense that save some circumstances people are downloading the game and won't buy it because of that.

Are we supposed to believe people can afford systems good enough to game, but not the games themselves?
post #47 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by FZ0 View Post
That's not the argument they make though, many people downloading games off the net will often not buy the game when they would have otherwise done so.

It's an argument of consequence, cause and effect. The downloading of the game is the cause as they see it plainly.

I happen to agree with them completely. It's just common sense that save some circumstances people are downloading the game and won't buy it because of that.
What argument are you referring to? I'm referencing the Ferrari analogy and how there are manufacturing costs to creating one, which is vastly differently from downloading digital files (and copying at the same time, because downloading is copying digitally).
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post #48 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by FZ0 View Post
That's not the argument they make though, many people downloading games off the net will often not buy the game when they would have otherwise done so.

It's an argument of consequence, cause and effect. The downloading of the game is the cause as they see it plainly.

I happen to agree with them completely. It's just common sense that save some circumstances people are downloading the game and won't buy it because of that.

Are we supposed to believe people can afford systems good enough to game, but not the games themselves?
Isn't it up to the game developers to make sure that IF someone does copy their game then it's more or less useless?

The technology is there. Look at Steam. A great way of preventing pirated copies of games being used.

Surely if the game devs dont account for piracy, they are giving the impression of "We don't care if you pirate this" when services like steam are available at a price which would be recouped in profits that would otherwise be lost due to piracy.

Also, I think alot of this article is aimed at commercial apps rather than games.
    
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post #49 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by alk View Post
Isn't it up to the game developers to make sure that IF someone does copy their game then it's more or less useless?

The technology is there. Look at Steam. A great way of preventing pirated copies of games being used.

Surely if the game devs dont account for piracy, they are giving the impression of "We don't care if you pirate this" when services like steam are available at a price which would be recouped in profits that would otherwise be lost due to piracy.

Also, I think alot of this article is aimed at commercial apps rather than games.
Steam is owned directly by a competitor in the gaming industry though, probably why other companies are cautious to utilize the idea.

There's nothing to stop them from taking advantage once everyone is feeding from Valves hand so to speak.

Also it still isn't the solution to piracy, hackers are smarter than that.
post #50 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by alk View Post
Also, I think alot of this article is aimed at commercial apps rather than games.
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