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post #51 of 77
My voltage increases when i put 100% load. lol
Dont rub it on there too long or too hard.

post #52 of 77
Just wondering...how exactly does a mod like that help? If your vdroop is lowering your voltage in Windows, then why not just bump up the voltage in the BIOS to offset it? Remember, I'm an overclocking noob.
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post #53 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arakasi View Post
My voltage increases when i put 100% load. lol
Dont rub it on there too long or too hard.

lol wow. No comment.

Anyway, if you did the volt mod and your voltages increase, then rub a little bit of the lead off with your finger until the voltages don't change. This was strongly recommended to me by ericoed. That's how I eliminated my vdroop. But now I want to eliminate the vdrop.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacko87 View Post
Just wondering...how exactly does a mod like that help? If your vdroop is lowering your voltage in Windows, then why not just bump up the voltage in the BIOS to offset it? Remember, I'm an overclocking noob.
Oh, I know the answer, but it's hard to explain. Give me a minute to figure out how to word this. I know I can do it.

Edit: If you raise the voltage to offset it, then your non-load voltage will always be higher than you technically need it to be. And the ultimate goal is to use the lowest voltage necessary, even idle (or especially idle?). And with the E8400, this is especially important because it's more sensitive to voltages (which is what I am told), so if one were to raise the voltage to offset the vdroop, the user could potentially destroy the chip from having too high of a constant voltage just to make up for the vdroop.

For example, ericoed showed me that Tricky destroyed his e8400 by going above 1.36v. So for example, if his vdroop were .04, and if he could only stay stable at 1.34 during a stress test, he'd have to raise the voltage to 1.38 to make up for the vdroop, and thus the chip could be ruined.

And of course, this also helps reduce heat as well because you can keep your voltages at the lowest voltage necessary to stay stable under full load, and not have to raise the voltage to compensate, thus keeping the temps a little lower than they otherwise would be.

So, the volt mod is great because it keeps the voltages steady, and thus you can set the voltage to it's lowest necessary setting to remain stable under full load. And with the e8400, that's a very good thing, especially for me because as you can see, I'm at 1.34v, and that's almost on the edge (my vdroop before the mod was about .04v).

If this needs clarification at all, please tell me.
post #54 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacko87 View Post
Just wondering...how exactly does a mod like that help? If your vdroop is lowering your voltage in Windows, then why not just bump up the voltage in the BIOS to offset it? Remember, I'm an overclocking noob.
It's just not a good idea. The volts still get pumped through the cpu.

For example, you have an e8400 and if you need say 1.45v for 4.2 Ghz on your processor, you're pushing the max voltage recommended by Intel. If you have a vdroop of say .10 your offsetting it can be putting it into potential harm.

Doing a simple pencil volt mod requires 2 minutes, a pencil, and a tiny bit of patience. Doing this might mean the difference of having an e8400 @ 1.45v for 4.3 Ghz and 1.35v @ 4.3 Ghz.

Not to mention, it will also run cooler at lower volts.

So pencil mod = way to go. I wouldn't recommend trying to 'offset' the vdroop. It could mean the difference of dramatically reducing your chip's life, or being in a safe zone.
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post #55 of 77
Well I have to look around for one of these mods on my board...
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post #56 of 77
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I wonder if there IS one.
post #57 of 77
Lowering the vdrop is a mute point since you can compensate for it in bios.

The vdroop on the other hand affects your OC. Consider this scenario:

When you set the vcore in bios to 1.35v, it will boot at something like 1.32v. The CPU will be running perfectly stable. Then you run Orthos and the voltage going to the CPU drops to 1.30v (vdroop). Now the CPU is starved of voltage and the system crashes.

So now you have to go into the bios and set the vcore to 1.3725v. Now when you boot up into windows at idle vcore is 1.35v. Then when you run Orthos, the vcore drops to 1.325v and the CPU stays stable.

Now imagine that the vdroop is gone (you've done the vdroop mod). You can run a 1.35v vcore in bios, 1.325v in windows, and not worry about the voltage dropping under load. So your CPU runs at lower voltage which also lowers temps.
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post #58 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacko87 View Post
Well I have to look around for one of these mods on my board...
There is a vdroop mod for the DS3R which is suposed to work also on the DS3L at VR-Zone:

Gigabyte P35-DS3R Voltage Mods
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post #59 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5CheeseLasagna View Post
Yeah, I wonder if there IS one.
Yeah after a bit searching, I didn't see anything on DS3L mods. My vdroop is about 0.016v, but my vdrop is about 0.045v...thats pretty bad as far as I know.

EDIT: ericeod, I saw that, but then saw this thread. I'll have to see for myself I guess...
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post #60 of 77
Thread Starter 
What I want to know is how somebody figured out which resistors were the right ones on these boards (and how they knew that pencil lead would work).
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