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why do intel & amd underclock their cpu - Page 2

post #11 of 14
Also so they can sell CPUs at 3.something GHZ for $1000 lol
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post #12 of 14
They underclock them so that there is a headroom to ensure stability. If said batch isn't stable at what speed it was designed for, they down clock it and make a second, cheaper model that still ensures stability.

e.g. the only difference between Q6600s and Q6700s is that the Q6600 chip batches weren't at Intel's stability standards at the speeds of a Q6700, so they under clock them so they are stable, rather than just throwing the chips in the trash.

I would do the same thing.

And to those of you saying it's because of the coolers...
Why the hell would Intel underclock a $250 CPU to be compatible with a "free" cooler?
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post #13 of 14
To put it simply: reliability.

As others have said, for the masses, having a nice stable system is much more important than pushing the speed envelope. Us OCN type are but a tiny fraction of CPU buyers. If you were running a business with 150 workstations, would you want 25% locking up and causing problems because of instability? Probably not.

When chips are binned, they're tested for stability under "worst case scenario" which means the highest allowable temperature and the lowest amount of voltage. This way, the chip will more than likely still work with a flaky/cheap power supply and bad airflow.

This difference between advertised/rated clock rate and highest attainable clock rate is referred to as "headroom".

Now if you take an OCN rig with a Tuniq or watercooling and a high-quality power supply, you can narrow the headroom gap without putting the chip within danger or drastically shortening its lifespan.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by MNiceGuy View Post
To put it simply: reliability.

As others have said, for the masses, having a nice stable system is much more important than pushing the speed envelope. Us OCN type are but a tiny fraction of CPU buyers. If you were running a business with 150 workstations, would you want 25% locking up and causing problems because of instability? Probably not.

When chips are binned, they're tested for stability under "worst case scenario" which means the highest allowable temperature and the lowest amount of voltage. This way, the chip will more than likely still work with a flaky/cheap power supply and bad airflow.

This difference between advertised/rated clock rate and highest attainable clock rate is referred to as "headroom".

Now if you take an OCN rig with a Tuniq or watercooling and a high-quality power supply, you can narrow the headroom gap without putting the chip within danger or drastically shortening its lifespan.
Yep, I agree. The "masses" by far consist of non-enthusiasts, many who may be completely ignorant of ideal running conditions for their PCs and who may have poor case cooling or poor ventilation. Lower clocks = higher stability, lower voltages, lesser power, less heat and can therefore can cope better in less than ideal conditions. Enthusiasts are simply aware of this design principle and take advantage of it by overclocking.
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