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Why does a processor get hot? - Page 3

post #21 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chozart View Post
People. Topic please. thanks.

What's the cause of heat in any electrical device? Electrical resistance! You pump a current to just about the tiniest of circruitry. Obviously, there is tons of resistance, and thus heat develops.
Quote:
Originally Posted by F3t1sh View Post
the flow of electrons going through the circuit creates energy formed by friction, resistance the circuit has, and the more it restricts the flow, the more energy is being held back or doing the funnel effect keeping electrons back (energy) and that stored energy must be "used up" so it's transfered into heat as it's the only way it has to "get rid" of the excess energy.

[EDIT] Gah, beat me too it Chozart! Maybe I shoulda elaborated more
Darn you guys, that's what I was gonna say.

Anyways, a circuit of any length has a resistance to the current flowing through it. So, by pushing more current through it, you generate more resistance. The resistance, because it is removing energy from the immediate system, must then be dissapated. And because the engergy can't really be released as kinetic engery (motion), sound, or light, it takes the form of heat.
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post #22 of 53
CPUs are inefficient in their current design. Therefore they take more power to run, because they lose so much energy in the form of heat (I think it is like >70%, but don't quote me). As the processors become more efficient like 90nm-65nm-45nm, eventually (in theory) the % of energy lost will become trivial and cooling will not be as much of an issue as it is now.
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post #23 of 53
Its mostly the resistance of the transistors, etc in a CPU.

If you look up Superconductivity, you can see what quantum computers are hoping to accomplish.
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post #24 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx7speed View Post
the same can be said of any type of cooling or any type of object being cooled if you look at it like that.
water, tec, phase, air, they all just absorb the heat and move it to a different location.
either way though it is still cooling the cpu.




I understand that but I also have a question regarding that as well. If I take a 12v car bat and hook up a 100k ohm resister the resister doesn't get very hot but then again if I just hook up a 1ohm resistor it would get a lot hotter. how come the 100k ohm resistor doesn't get hotter if there is more resistance?
More resistance = less current flowing. Less current flowing = less power transferred. Less Power transferred = less overall resistance. Less overall resistance = cooler object since less energy is dissipated through it.

So, in a CPU, transistors fire/don't fire--anytime current (voltage) is passed through a transistor, they have a resistance. A by-product of electrical resistance is conversion of electrical energy to kinetic energy (heat) due to electrons interacting with the substrate. This is what causes the heat--so a CPU (like any other electrical device), gets hot due to electrical current. Not sure if you'd like more clarification...
    
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post #25 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Battista View Post
Its mostly the resistance of the transistors, etc in a CPU.

If you look up Superconductivity, you can see what quantum computers are hoping to accomplish.
Superconductivity has nothing to do with quantum computing. Quantum computing simply relies on the "quanta" of energy that an atom (or electron) has, where this quanta of energy can change for the atom/electron in nearly infinitecimal ways (as opposed to just "1's" and "0's" in a conventional circuit, which we currently call "bits" of data), which can lead to more efficiently performing calculations as opposed to our way of multiple electrical interpretations of data.
    
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post #26 of 53
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post #27 of 53
Nearly all of the energy consumed by a CPU is disipated as heat, for the reasons others have listed.

Pack the same heat output of a 100w bulb into an area the size of a fingernail and you get some pretty crazy temperatures without additional cooling.
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post #28 of 53
CPUs get hot because of resistance to conducting electricity. They do not conduct electricity that is supplied to them with 100% efficiency. If all of the energy applied to the processor as electricity is not conducted then it must be converted to another form of energy - this is the law of conservation of energy. In this case, it is converted to heat which of course makes the CPU temperature rise.

A very good description of how electric current can generate heat can be found HERE.
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post #29 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx7speed View Post
the same can be said of any type of cooling or any type of object being cooled if you look at it like that.
water, tec, phase, air, they all just absorb the heat and move it to a different location.
either way though it is still cooling the cpu.
This is a common misconception, in the technical sense.

It is impossible to "cool" anything down, since there is no such thing as "cool" energy. You can however, add, or remove heat energy through various means.

This concept is an important part of understanding physics, as physics is purely the application of forces and energy.

This is useful to know when trying to visualize how a HSF/Waterblock/etc works:, as well as how heat energy is transferred in this application.

Heat energy is caused by atoms vibrating at high frequency, bouncing around in the area they are confined to. This vibration causes them to jostle other nearby atoms by transferring some of their energy and momentum. The closer together the atoms are (density), the easier it is for the atoms to transfer their energy to others.
This is what makes Copper a good thermal conductor, is that it is quite dense (along with several other thermal properties). The atoms of copper are close together, easily transferring energy from one to another.

Air however, being a gaseous substance, is a poor thermal conductor. In fact, it is considered an insulator thanks to its low density. It is the low density of air, that requires us to use heat sinks. The heat sink spreads the heat over a much greater surface area (from say, 1cm^2 to >1000cm^2). This greater surface area allows the HS to transfer heat to the air because more air is touching it. By moving air over the heat sink, we continually resupply the heatsink with new atoms to transfer the stored heat into.

Which brings us to the point of Liquid Cooling. Liquid Cooling can be thought of as simply, a very large, and complicated Heat Sink. All it does, transfer the heat from the waterblock, to a fluid medium, which then transports the heat energy to an object with a very large surface area (say >10,000cm^2), through which it dumps the heat into the air around it.

This then leads us into heat soak/saturation/capacity, and other topics which could be discussed...

Dunno if that helps, but I hope it does
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post #30 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwIsTeDbOi View Post
P = I * E

That's why.
E stands for Energy as far as I know...

It should be P = V * I, Power = Voltage * Current.
    
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