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post #21 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by dangerousHobo View Post
Arch can't run on really old machines b/c its for i686 architectures. But it'll work for his P4.

slackware
Minimal requirements:
Processor i486
RAM 32 MB
Disk Space 1GB
Media Drive 4x CD-ROM
and you can install Xfce from it.
well i use NetBSD for REALLY old stuff

slax is great too, the biggest two issues are:
1. Not particularly easy to use, and
2. It can be hard to get it to work wit cutting edge machines
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post #22 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by dangerousHobo View Post
Arch can't run on really old machines b/c its for i686 architectures. But it'll work for his P4.
Could you explain the concept of the ix86 thing?

So I would assume the newest CPUs are going to be i686. If a distro is made for "i386," then I'm guessing that's going to mean it can run on i386 CPUs and up?

And second, what's an i186, what's 286, ... , 686?
post #23 of 33
Thread Starter 
Well since I have never used linux im going to not try slackware yet, but I will try that method to get xubuntu to install. I was wondering though, instead of setting up your LAN through the command promt what if you put in random settings then went back and changed it when you had a GUI to baby you through it?

Arch seems good since I have little ram, but I am a newb and it looks like you need a lil xp for that one.
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post #24 of 33
Use PCLinuxOS, a Mandriva based distro. In fact use the "Mini Me" version of PCLinuxOS. It comes with only the bare minimum of software installed so you can later install exactly what you want and need. If you use something like SuSE or Fedora, you will be inundated with a huge collection of needless software.

I have tried all major distros and PCLOS is by far the easiest to get running. Once you jump into a distro like PCLOS or Ubuntu, later on you will be prepared for the Slackwares and BSD's of the world.

PCLOS is #2 on distrowatch behind Ubuntu. It held the #1 spot for a while.
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post #25 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post
If you use something like SuSE or Fedora, you will be inundated with a huge collection of needless software.
Not true at all. In fact, out of all the distros I've used (and I've used many), Suse is one of the most customizable when it comes to choosing packages prior to installation.
post #26 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hundred Gunner View Post
Not true at all. In fact, out of all the distros I've used (and I've used many), Suse is one of the most customizable when it comes to choosing packages prior to installation.

And easy too. I have yet to see an easier (and feature rich) installer than the one in Suse. The Debian installer can do everything that the Suse one can, but it can be much more intimidating to new users.
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post #27 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by XJBluto View Post
However, Sabayon is pretty as he11
http://www.sabayonlinux.org/mod/mirrors
[off-topic] Yey! another Sabayon user?

Back-on-topic: *buntu might be the way to go. But give the LiveCD of Sabayon a whirl too ^_^
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post #28 of 33
Howdy fellas.

I by no means meant to bash SuSe. I tried the latest version a month or two ago and I agree that the installer is top notch. However, during the install I clicked to "upgrade" to all the latest packages and it downloaded over a GB of software (yes a GB). When it was all said and done, SuSe took up several GB of drive space. I found that to be a bit much. On the other hand, PCLOS "Mini me" is only around 260 MB total. I prefer to have a clean install with the bare minimum software so I can simply add exactly what I want later.

I agree about Sabayan having great potential. I really liked the look of it when I tried it, but unfortunately, it wouldn't recognize my sound card upon install and got my screen resolution wrong. PCLOS is the ONLY distro I have ever used that set my screen resolution to 1440X900 at 60 Hz out of the box. It's the only distro that recognized ALL of my hardware without me having to tweak anything. "Texstar" does a great job maintaining PCLOS and he does most of the work himself. The only negative with PCLOS that I see is that Texstar has yet to release a 64 bit version. I surmise because a lot of proprietary software companies (like Adobe) haven't released many 64 bit drivers yet (good luck with getting Adobe Flash to work in a 64 bit distro -- it can be done but it's a major PITA).

Fedora 9 gets released in a week or two. I am looking forward to trying it, as it has the option of installing KDE 4.
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post #29 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melcar View Post
And easy too. I have yet to see an easier (and feature rich) installer than the one in Suse. The Debian installer can do everything that the Suse one can, but it can be much more intimidating to new users.
Agreed. This is why I like Suse - I think there is a good balance between power and ease. Sometimes I feel like it has lower quality compared to other distros, but for the most part I think the balance is good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post
However, during the install I clicked to "upgrade" to all the latest packages and it downloaded over a GB of software (yes a GB).
I would imagine that this is because 10.3 is (nearly?) a year old, and probably because you had a lot of packages installed by default. They don't do upgrades every 6 months or so like Ubuntu and Fedora (sometimes), so it would take a while for the repos list to update and then download the stuff. I know it takes a while - Suse took about 30 min to download all the repo information upon install. That's one downfall of Suse - it's slower compared to other distros. Although they've gotten much, much better since 10.0, it's still a little slow compared to the rest.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post
When it was all said and done, SuSe took up several GB of drive space. I found that to be a bit much. On the other hand, PCLOS "Mini me" is only around 260 MB total. I prefer to have a clean install with the bare minimum software so I can simply add exactly what I want later.
I doubt that. An install of Arch Linux without X, without any GUI, is a little over 500MB.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post
I agree about Sabayan having great potential. I really liked the look of it when I tried it, but unfortunately, it wouldn't recognize my sound card upon install and got my screen resolution wrong. PCLOS is the ONLY distro I have ever used that set my screen resolution to 1440X900 at 60 Hz out of the box.
Hmm, that's unfortunate. Sabayon was actually the only distro that I didn't have to do ANY manual installing on. The sound and graphics drivers were installed by default (the graphic driver was even enabled in the Live disk; I could use Compiz-Fusion from Live Mode; impressive.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post
It's the only distro that recognized ALL of my hardware without me having to tweak anything. "Texstar" does a great job maintaining PCLOS and he does most of the work himself. The only negative with PCLOS that I see is that Texstar has yet to release a 64 bit version.
Great to hear PCLOS is working for you. This is actually one of the distros I never got around to trying. I've tried PC-BSD, but not for very long. Is there any relationship between the two?

Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post
Fedora 9 gets released in a week or two. I am looking forward to trying it, as it has the option of installing KDE 4.
Yes, I'm quite excited to trying Fedora 9. In fact, I'm always excited to try any new distro to see how far along Open Source is coming along

Edit: 7000th Post!!!
Edited by The Hundred Gunner - 5/10/08 at 7:56pm
post #30 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hundred Gunner View Post

I doubt that. An install of Arch Linux without X, without any GUI, is a little over 500MB.
Don't doubt it -- believe it.

http://linux.softpedia.com/progDownl...oad-11665.html

It comes with KDE 3.5.8 and Konqueror browser and a few other basic apps. Download size is 297 MB.

Of course I downloaded Firefox, Thunderbird, WINE, Compiz-Fusion, and other basic apps I use often, but I seriously doubt Mini Me is taking up more than 1 GB on my drive. BTW, Compiz-fusion works flawlessly straight from the repos.

Note: Mini Me is not the same as the official PCLOS, as PCLOS itself will be bigger than 297 MB. It's the same distro except Mini Mi comes with the bare minimum of software (but it does come with KDE installed). Mini Me is an official branch off, but there are probably a dozen unofficial branch off's of PCLOS.


Quote:
Great to hear PCLOS is working for you. This is actually one of the distros I never got around to trying. I've tried PC-BSD, but not for very long. Is there any relationship between the two?
No, PCLOS is not a BSD variant. It is Linux. PCLOS is based on Mandriva and uses Synaptic package manager.
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