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OpenSolaris 2008 Anyone? - Page 3

post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post
The only issue I have with BSD in general is it's lack of compiled and ready to install packages -- it has a long way to go to catch up with the repositories of, say, Debian/Ubuntu and Fedora. If BSD had the package selection of most Linux distros, it would be very tempting for a lot of "tinkering" and perhaps a permanent switch.
Actually you have a choice between using binary packages with pkg and compiling the sources with make. The advantage of the latter is that you have an access to the most recent software and additional customization options.
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post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post
And, oh yeah, don't forget about Solaris's ZFS file system. Many a Linux developer would love to get their hands on that in order to port it to Linux.
That is something Linux devs what to do, but b/c of the licence ZFS has they can't without doing some cheap tricks that basiclly would make it pointless to do in the first place.


Forget Solaris though, BSD is better IMO. You can learn a lot from FreeBSD. It has a large list of applications in its ports (mostly the same apps you'd find in linux (the same is not true with Solaris)). I've still yet to try 7.0 though I downloaded it the morning it came out
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post #23 of 31
there is still no native support for adobe's flash (gnash sux) in FreeBSD, and some incompatibility issues with x86_64, but forgetting this it's an awesome OS
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post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkdir View Post
what for? (unless you have a sparc)
There are x86 and x86_x64 versions. I don't know what the use of it is, though. I know it's supposedly good for servers, but it's not functional enough for desktop usage.

To the OP: if you want something easy, there's PC-BSD. You might like to check that out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unknownm View Post
The Hundred Gunner just said its freebsd and unix
FreeBSD is kinda like a "UNIX distro." Correct me if I'm wrong. OS X is supposedly based in FreeBSD. The kernel is Apple's proprietary "Darwin" kernel. You can see this by typing "uname" into the Terminal (Linux users will see the name "Linux xxxxxxxx," indicating their kernel name. So since the kernel is proprietary, I'm not sure about which exact part of OS X is "UNIX-based." The Terminal works exactly the same way that the one in Linux does, so there's a similarity... But like I said, I don't know in which exact, techincal respect OSX is related to UNIX.
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hundred Gunner View Post
There are x86 and x86_x64 versions. I don't know what the use of it is, though. I know it's supposedly good for servers, but it's not functional enough for desktop usage.
What I ment, is that it is more optimized for Sun's SPARC processors. For x86 and x86_64 you can use GNU/Linux, or FreeBSD with a much better efficiency
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post #26 of 31
OK, you guys are drifting all over the place on this one.

SolarisOS is meant _mainly_ for Sparc processors and is optimized accordingly.
OpenSolaris will run on Sparc, x64 (itanium) and x86 processors and is free. It is also used as a beta OS like fedora is to test hardware and code for the mainstream OS (SolarisOS).
OpenSolaris has been around for a long time in some form or another and used to be thought of by SUN as a diversion. They are taking it more seriously in the last few years. Yes OpenSolaris is meant for use on servers and my luck trying to get it to work well in a workstation environment has been futile. Works great as a server OS though.

BSD != freeBSD! OSX is based off of freeBSD NOT BSD. (had this conversation with my old neighbor who is one of the founders of freeBSD and current project lead for OSX at Apple. OK his title is really; "Director of Engineering of Unix Technologies" at Apple).

Someone mentioned CentOS. CentOS is a really stable distribution of the same bits RHEL is based off of and can be used as a server OS or a workstation OS. It is usually a couple of releases behind RHEL or Fedora because they want to make sure it IS stable (at least this is how they used to operate).

My company uses:
SolarisOS on our internal servers running Informix and backup servers.
Fedora Core9 on our webserver cluster and Document Server.
OpenSolaris for testing and possible replacement of SolarisOS.
Windows 2003 server for mail and CRM.
IRIX on a large SGI system (128 processors) for customer development use.

We also sell all major flavors of Linux, RedHat, Solaris and Windows. All the big boys use RHEL for their internal systems and products, and our smaller customers use SUSE and Fedora almost exclusively.

Sample:
Most of those satellite images on google maps (and others)? Processed on large SGI systems running IRIX.
Your next Laser surgery will be performed by a mix of Linux, Server 2003 and XP.
That movie you watched last night was transfered to digital from analog most likely on a workstation running RHEL5. 2 years ago it was almost exclusively done on SGI workstations running IRIX.
Your local weather data was most likely collected on a diskless node booting a linux kernel (probably Fedora) and is displayed as video using an SGI workstation (not for long though).
...I can name more...
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post #27 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by airbozo View Post
OK, you guys are drifting all over the place on this one.

SolarisOS is meant _mainly_ for Sparc processors and is optimized accordingly.
OpenSolaris will run on Sparc, x64 (itanium) and x86 processors and is free. It is also used as a beta OS like fedora is to test hardware and code for the mainstream OS (SolarisOS).
OpenSolaris has been around for a long time in some form or another and used to be thought of by SUN as a diversion. They are taking it more seriously in the last few years. Yes OpenSolaris is meant for use on servers and my luck trying to get it to work well in a workstation environment has been futile. Works great as a server OS though.
Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't OpenSolaris supposed to be more geared for the desktop? Isn't that part of the goal? I am not saying they are there yet, but many of you act as if I'm crazy for mentioning OpenSolaris as a desktop alternative.


Quote:
My company uses:
SolarisOS on our internal servers running Informix and backup servers.
Fedora Core9 on our webserver cluster and Document Server.
OpenSolaris for testing and possible replacement of SolarisOS.
Windows 2003 server for mail and CRM.
IRIX on a large SGI system (128 processors) for customer development use.

We also sell all major flavors of Linux, RedHat, Solaris and Windows. All the big boys use RHEL for their internal systems and products, and our smaller customers use SUSE and Fedora almost exclusively.

Sample:
Most of those satellite images on google maps (and others)? Processed on large SGI systems running IRIX.
Your next Laser surgery will be performed by a mix of Linux, Server 2003 and XP.
That movie you watched last night was transfered to digital from analog most likely on a workstation running RHEL5. 2 years ago it was almost exclusively done on SGI workstations running IRIX.
Your local weather data was most likely collected on a diskless node booting a linux kernel (probably Fedora) and is displayed as video using an SGI workstation (not for long though).
...I can name more...

Cool, thanks for all of that info -- interesting stuff! I do think that with Solaris now open source, RedHat and SUSE will have a major competitor in the open source market.
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post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post
Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't OpenSolaris supposed to be more geared for the desktop? Isn't that part of the goal? I am not saying they are there yet, but many of you act as if I'm crazy for mentioning OpenSolaris as a desktop alternative.

When I started working with OpenSolaris (Solaris x86) it was intended to displace SCO Unix on the intel chips. SCO took care of themselves so SUN stopped working on Solaris x86 for a while until linux started pushing them out of the server space. Once they realized the threat from Linux and about the same time they bought Cobalt (they used systems with the opteron), SUN started working on Solaris x86 again and renamed it OpenSolaris (It was really never an open OS before that, just free). They still have a way to go to be able to call it a desktop replacement, but it is still pretty stable and works great if you don't have any esoteric devices installed.



Cool, thanks for all of that info -- interesting stuff! I do think that with Solaris now open source, RedHat and SUSE will have a major competitor in the open source market.
Hehe I finally finished a major project, survived an ISO9001 audit and I dumped my last sysadmin client (too whiny for me). Now I have too much time on my hands, so I got a little wordy... Damn now I'm only working 2 jobs... I feel bored!

BTW The SO and I used to work for SUN and her father still works there. That's how I know most of this stuff. I used to support the Solaris x86 project (among others) and I think I still have my t-shirt with a big SCO on it with the red circle with an X on it. (No SCO) Similar to this one: LINK
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post #29 of 31
I do hear-by bump this thread.

I have a machine which has some physical hardware problems that Linux just doesn't like (quite sad for a person such as myself). I couldn't bear the thought of having a machine with just Windows on it, so I was first looking at *BSD, but the various distros have some really strange installation methods (where's my single DVD!?). OpenSolaris was an obvious next choice - it comes with everything I'd be working on anyway (Compiz, though very old, but that doesn't matter, I'm a dev, it's not like I'm going to leave it like that).

Burned up the Live CD to a DVD, popped it in and... it runs perfectly!
I'm quite happy with OpenSolaris so far. It comes with nVidia drivers, so my GeForce FX works perfectly. It properly configured my Wacom Bamboo (except it's in relative mode, but that's better than, say, Ubuntu, which leaves it in contact-only relative and it's really slow). The only problems I've had so far are fixable - for one, the installer won't resize an NTFS partition. I just stuck my HDD in one of my Ubuntu machines and fired up GParted, split the drive in two and I'm installing as I type this. The other problem I've had so far is that it doesn't come with drivers for a BCM4401 wired NIC. Luckily, the build process for them is quite simple and they should work fine. Other than that, the install itself is slooooooow, I've been here for hours and it's only at 61%. The Live CD also hiccups quite often, but when it's running right it's quite fast.

So, OpenSolaris - awesome.
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post #30 of 31
Sounds nice. There's a new release scheduled for November which sounds enticing, I might try that if I have a new machine by then.
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