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I suppose it makes perfect sense that the network perceived as the favorite of old folks that advertisers no longer covet would attempt to leapfrog its competition by making a big splash in online. However, in moving to acquire CNET Networks for $1.8 billion, just what exactly is CBS getting? A new-age media company at the cutting edge, or a leader of the Web 1.0 world which lately has been slow to adapt?

I'd argue it's the latter. CNET clearly was the ne plus ultra of the early online journalism era -- say, 1994 until the past few years -- consistently at the head of the pack in churning out great coverage on news.com and on CNET's gaggle of reviews and downloads sites.

More recently, though, two big developments have thrown a monkey wrench into the old online-content model. First off, it's not clear whether readers really want a steady diet of text-based news and reviews when they now have at their disposal video, images, and -- most important -- social-networking sites where they can essentially "chat" with their friends about stuff, as opposed to sitting in front of their laptops reading long streams of text.
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My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 3570K Asrock Z77 Gigabyte 6850 G.Skill F3-12800CL9 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
WD Caviar Black Asus 24x DVD-RW Multi Win 7, CentOS, BT 5.0 RC2, Mac OSX 10.7.4 Dual Asus VH236H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Saitek Eclipse PC P&C 610 KingWin Logitech Optical TracBall 
Mouse Pad
A drug company generic black pad 
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