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Types of Overclocking Failures - Page 2

post #11 of 13
Diagnosing overclocking failures is a difficult task, especially when you don't do things methodically and systematically. For example, say you just think that you'll go for a target frequency (let's say 3.0GHz), and you make your BIOS settings adjustments accordingly (FSB x CPU multi = CPU Frequency for Intels; HTT Clock x CPU multi = CPU Frequency for AMDs). You do it all in one go, and you increase your VCore to what you believe is a good value; you overvolt your NB; you set your RAM divider; you do all these things all in one step, and you get a failed overclock. You now have a problem of not knowing which one (or which combination) of the settings adjustments you did caused the failed OC.

Therefore, the key thing when overclocking (in my opinion), especially if you want a stable, usable system afterwards, is to do things systematically. There are myriad guides available online that show you how to do this, but the basic point can be summed up thus: Isolate, then consolidate. That's the most succinct description of the process of OCing. The logic behind this philosophy is that it's easier to analyze a problem if you're only looking at one factor at a time.

Now, to perhaps add to your list of OCing failure scenarios: Broken hardware. You can easily overcook components if your OCing adventure is too reckless or ill-planned. Anything that has electricity and heat acting on it can break. Especially vulnerable are RAM, MOSFETs (PWMICs/voltage regulators), and bridge chips. These components are just as heavily stressed as the component (CPU, GPU) being overclocked.

Hope this helps! This is a good thread, in my opinion.
    
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post #12 of 13
Another one would be "works fine for a couple days, passes Prime and CPU Burn-In, but crashes in Games". That one has happened to me a few times. I'll be "stable" as far as benchmarking goes, 2 hour Prime stable, 2 hour CPU Burn-In stable, and surfing the internet, and listening to music, and basic usage. But once I play a game for about 45 minutes, BSOD or just black screen reboot. Some games in aprticular (like TF2) are especially picky about CPU stability.
    
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Cooler Master Nepton 240m Windows 10 Pro Samsung 34" Curved Ultrawide (3440x1440) Samsung 22" Portrait (1080x1920) 
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Poker II Cherry MX Brown, KBParadise V80 Cherry... EVGA G2 650W Cooler Master Silencio 652s Steelseries Sensei Wireless 
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post #13 of 13
What about unrecoverable failures, such as smoking mobos and cpus? This is an overheating failure. Actually, the components usually start melting around then.

(I tried it on a Celeron, 2.2GHz - 3.6GHz, then poof!)

I know these are worst case senarios, but they still are failures.
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