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[WP] Ransomware Encrypts Victim Files With 1,024-Bit Key - Page 3

post #21 of 69
this virus is pretty bad, not only do your files get locked but in order to unlock them you have to give your credit card info to some random person, which will probably be used against you!
    
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post #22 of 69
Sounds like a creepy virus man ! 1024 bit encryption! Now that'll be a handful!
post #23 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by pauldovi View Post
Unless the hacker was clever enough to route it through several different countries to a final destination that has laws friendly to his activity.

Or he could just use stolen financial accounts.
Spoken like a pro!
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post #24 of 69
how long do you guys think it would take IBM's cell supercomputer to break it?
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post #25 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by pauldovi View Post
Unless the hacker was clever enough to route it through several different countries to a final destination that has laws friendly to his activity.

Or he could just use stolen financial accounts.
Simply routing it through "several different countries" would be stupid as it is still completly tracable. There are many ways to hide yourself, routing through different countries is not one. Besides there is no way the original coder would personally distribute. After releasing the piece of software onto the web it would be deployed by botnet further masking the originator.

EDIT:

Quote:
"We estimate it would take around 15 million modern computers, running for about a year, to crack such a key," writes Aleks Gostev, senior virus analyst at Kaspersky, on the company's blog
Yea go figure. This is bad lol.
Edited by Sikozu - 6/11/08 at 7:13pm
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post #26 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by trueg50 View Post
What I wonder is, if you already have an encrypted drive, will it just corrupt the heck out of it trying to encrypt it, or would the encryption software block the new encryption.
Neither. Encryption treats it as raw data - it doesn't know it's already encrypted.

It just means that once the 1024bit encryption is decrypted, you need to decrypt the other one as well to get to the files.
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post #27 of 69
Brute-force cracking 1024-bit encryption would take so long civilization+ would end before it is done.

Quote:
Second, it would hurt the small personal computer uses far more than business's, business's (the well run ones) usually have at least monthly backups.
What kind of idiot keeps any important files on their computer. People that keep critical personal information such as identifications and accounts on their computer are just asking for trouble.
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post #28 of 69
Brute-forcing 1024-bit encryption? 2^1024 is an extremely large number (well over 300 digits). Even if several googols of keys were tested every second, a googol^2 number of stars could be born, burn and die, one at a time, and then perhaps all 2^1024 keys would have been tested. Our solar system would have long since been destroyed, because our sun is merely one star out of the googol^2 number of stars. Is that a better perspective?
Edited by Jewels - 6/12/08 at 3:21pm
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post #29 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jewels View Post
Brute-forcing 1024-bit encryption? 2^1024 is an extremely large number (well over 300 digits). Even if several googols of keys were tested every second, a googol^2 number of stars could be born, burn and die, one at a time, and then perhaps all 2^1024 keys would have been tested. Our solar system would have long since been destroyed, because our sun is merely one star out of the googol^2 number of stars. Is that a better perspective?


My head hurts.

Who wants helmets?!
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post #30 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jewels View Post
Brute-forcing 1024-bit encryption? 2^1024 is an extremely large number (well over 300 digits). Even if several googols of keys were tested every second, a googol^2 number of stars could be born, burn and die, one at a time, and then perhaps all 2^1024 keys would have been tested. Our solar system would have long since been destroyed, because our sun is merely one star out of the googol^2 number of stars. Is that a better perspective?

1.797693134862315907729305190789e+308 to be exact...
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